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Tee Morris

The Journey to Night Vale: The Foundations of SFF Podcast Fiction

So, you want to hear a story?

Last week, Wired Magazine featured an article entitled “Fiction Podcasts Are Finally a Thing! Thank You, Sci-Fi and Horror.” As I have been both a podcaster and a podcast consumer since 2004, I was anxious to find out what journalist Charley Locke and Wired had to say about Fiction Podcasts. However, I found myself scratching my head the more I read, especially when Locke boldly stated, “Years after Welcome to Night Vale first defined the genre, fictional podcasts have finally arrived.” This echoes a New York Times article from March of this year when Night Vale co-creator Joseph Fink said “The whole fiction podcast thing blew up in the past year.”

[Fiction podcasting has been alive and well for over a decade.]

The Three P’s of Steampunk Filmmaking

It has been a question that I’ve seen resurface since Justin Beiber’s holiday movie tie-in single, “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” went steampunk for their music video: Why does steampunk still matter?

The movement has been around for decades, and in recent years steampunk has become a fascination for mainstream culture. Literature remains a driving force behind its popularity. From books and graphic novels, and the colorful characters created within them, makers of both fabric and fabrication backgrounds bring to life this 19th century that never happened. Musicians such as The Men Who Will Be Blamed for Nothing, Abney Park, Paul Shapera, and even Rush are also finding inspiration from steampunk.

There is one creative arena where steampunk remains not only undiscovered country, but exciting country to explore: steampunk in film. There are many projects in production, some of which are reaching to the community for help in doing it right, but filmmaking—particularly for steampunk—offers incredible challenges. Challenges that, when conquered, can be quite rewarding. 

[Carry on, old chap…]

Series: Steampunk Week 2012