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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

The Stars Are Right but the Cultists Need Coffee II: Necronomicon 2019

Welcome back to the Lovecraft Reread! Anne and I have been busy traveling with the Mi-Go going to too many conventions (me) and undergoing obscure and unnatural distortions of the human form  dealing with medical foo undergoing obscure and unnatural distortions of the human form (Anne). I’ve returned this week to report on Providence’s revels celebrating the rightness of the stars. Next week, Anne will join me once more to explore some of the cosmic secrets hinted at during those unholy rites author recommendations from the con.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

No Mask? No Mask! — Mira Grant’s In the Shadow of Spindrift House

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Mira Grant’s In the Shadow of Spindrift House, released just this summer as a standalone novella from Subterranean Press. Spoilers ahead, really a lot of spoilers, go read the thing first. We’ll wait.

[“Humanity has sacrificed so much on the altar of geometry…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

It’s Not the Chosen One’s Job to Knock on Doors — The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we celebrate our 250th post by watching The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu, a 2009 comedy-horror flick directed by Henry Saine and scripted by Devin McGinn. Trigger warnings (in the movie, not the post) for bloody guts, rape jokes, and frequent obscenities including slurs. Spoilers ahead.

[“The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind.” — HPL]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

My Laugh is an Evil Laugh: Michael Chabon’s “The God of Dark Laughter”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Michael Chabon’s “The God of Dark Laughter,” first published in The New Yorker in April 2009. Spoilers ahead.

[“Damn you, Ganz,” I said, though I was not in truth addressing the poor fellow, who, I knew, would not be able to answer my question anytime soon. “What’s a dead clown doing in my woods?”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

A Massage From Beyond the Veil of Night: T.E.D. Klein’s “Nadelman’s God”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading T.E.D. Klein’s “Nadelman’s God,” first published in the Dark Gods collection in 1985. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Bantha Milk and Durian: Ng Yi-Sheng’s “Xingzhou”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ng Yi-Sheng’s “Xingzhou,” first published in the July 2019 issue of Clarkesworld. Spoilers ahead—but read it yourself first; you won’t be sorry!

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Jobs From Hell Would Be An Improvement: David Liss’s “The Doors that Never Close and the Doors that Are Always Open”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading David Liss’s “The Doors that Never Close and the Doors that Are Always Open,” first published in 2015 in Aaron J French’s The Gods of H. P. Lovecraft anthology. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Spirit of the Century: Fritz Leiber’s “Smoke Ghost”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Fritz Leiber’s “Smoke Ghost,” first published in the October 1941 issue of Unknown Worlds. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Old Gods and Older: Premee Mohamed’s “Us and Ours”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Premee Mohamed’s “Us and Ours,” first published in Jennifer Brozek’s 2019 anthology A Secret Guide to Fighting Elder Gods. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Bad Ideas 101: David Barr Kirtley’s “The Disciple”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading David Barr Kirtley’s “The Disciple,” first published in the Summer 2002 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead–trigger warning for cruelty to animals.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

New Words to Wordless Songs: Nibedita Sen’s “We Sang You As Ours”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Nibedita Sen’s “We Sang You As Ours,” first published in the June 2019 issue of The Dark. Spoilers ahead—but go ahead and read it yourself; it’s short and awesome.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Still the Worst Color: Anya Martin’s “Old Tsah-Hov”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Anya Martin’s “Old Tsah-Hov,” first published in Joseph S. Pulver, Sr.’s Cassilda’s Song anthology in 2015. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Kudzu From Beyond: Lucy Snyder’s “Blossoms Blackened Like Dead Stars”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lucy Snyder’s “Blossoms Blackened Like Dead Stars,” first published in Scott Gable and C. Dombrowski’s Ride the Star Wind anthology of Lovecraftian space opera in 2017. Spoilers ahead.

[“Simply meeting the blister-eyed gaze of a spawn twists your brains.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Avoiding Angles is Still Harder Than it Sounds: Adam Gauntlett’s “New Build”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Adam Gauntlett’s “New Build,” first published in The Private Life of Elder Things in 2011. Spoilers ahead.

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Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Secret Lives of Serpents: Priya Sharma’s “Fabulous Beasts”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Priya Sharma’s “Fabulous Beasts,” first published here on Tor.com in July 2015. It was shortlisted for the Shirley Jackson Award, and All the Fabulous Beasts, Sharma’s collection containing it, is on this year’s shortlist (which is how we encountered it). As the original Tor.com publication warns, this story (along with our post about it) deals with difficult content and themes, including child abuse, incest, and rape. Spoilers ahead.

[“I looked into the snake’s black eyes and could see out of them into my own. The world was on the tip of her forked tongue…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

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