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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

Feeding the Drama-Eaters: P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout (Part 4)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout, first published in 2020, with Chapters 7-8. Spoilers ahead!

[“You ever hear the story of Truth and Lies?”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Perils of Lockdown: Cassandra Khaw’s “Quiet Dead Things”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Cassandra Khaw’s “Quiet Dead Things,” first published in Ellen Datlow’s 2021 When Things Get Dark anthology. Spoilers ahead, but we encourage you to go ahead and read this one first yourself!

[“To be human, Mr. Carpenter believed, was to work relentlessly…”]

Bait for Chosen Ones: P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout (Part 3)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout, first published in 2020, with Chapters 5-6. Spoilers ahead!

[“Why, Maryse, we don’t think we’ve seen you so mad.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Gothic Mundane: Ellen Glasgow’s “Jordan’s End”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Ellen Glasgow’s “Jordan’s End,” first published in Glasgow’s 1923 collection The Shadowy Third and Other Stories. You can find it in Morton and Klinger’s Weird Women. Spoilers ahead. CW for ambiguous euthanasia or suicide.

[“Why, that woman will be beautiful when she is a skeleton…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Free Meat: P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout (Part 2)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout, first published in 2020, with Chapters 3-4. Spoilers ahead!

[“They are the lie.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Perils of Art Criticism: Nelly Geraldine García-Rosas’ “Still Life With Vial of Blood”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Nelly Geraldine García-Rosas’ “Still Life With Vial of Blood,” first published in the September 2021 issue of Nightmare Magazine. Spoilers ahead. Lots of spoilers, as the story is itself barely longer than the summary—we recommend going and reading it for yourself. CW for suicide and acid attacks.

[“I love gloomy days, but not gloomy fire days. The sky is made of smoke.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

This Monster-Hunting Business Don’t Pay for Itself: P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout (Part 1)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we start on P. Djèlí Clark’s Ring Shout, first published in 2020, with Chapters 1-2. Spoilers ahead!

[“In the Shout, you got to move the way the spirit tell you…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Count the Monsters, If You Can: Ray Bradbury’s “The Man Upstairs”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Ray Bradbury’s “The Man Upstairs,” first published in the March 1947 issue of Harper’s Magazine. Spoilers ahead.

[“It’s poor judgment,” said Grandpa, “to call anything by a name.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Low Standards of the Legal Profession: John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” Part 6

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we finish up John Connolly’s The Fractured Atlas, first published in 2015 as part of Night Music: Nocturnes Volume II, with Part V: “And in Darkness Shall We Dwell.” Spoilers ahead.

[“Lionel Maulding never stopped screaming, but he made no noise in that place.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Gossip Man Was Not Meant to Know: Fritz Leiber’s “To Arkham and the Stars”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Fritz Leiber’s “To Arkham and the Stars,” first published in 1966 in Arkham House’s The Dark Brotherhood. Spoilers ahead.

[“…after you’ve spent an adult lifetime at Miskatonic, you discover you’ve developed a rather different understanding from the herd’s of the distinction between the imaginary and the real.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Universe as Unreliable Narrator: John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” Part 5

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with John Connolly’s The Fractured Atlas, first published in 2015 as part of Night Music: Nocturnes Volume II, with Part IV, sections IX-XVII: “The Wanderer in Unknown Realms.” Spoilers ahead.

[“Every entity that rages against the light is part of it…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Room Service for the Squamous: Sarah Peploe’s “UNDR”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Sarah Peploe’s “UNDR,” first published in Scott R. Jones’s 2018 anthology, Chthonic: Weird Tales of Inner Earth. Spoilers ahead.

[“We crawled from the seas and from the trees at its sufferance and walked above it, likewise, at its sufferance. Slipped down through its pores, by its sufferance.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Souls for Sale, Bargain Prices: John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” Part 4

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we start on John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” first published in 2015 as part of Night Music: Nocturnes Volume II, with Part IV, sections I-VIII: “The Wanderer in Unknown Realms.” Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: Reading the Weird

You Will Fear the Fuchsia, Yet Again: From Beyond (1986)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we celebrate Post #350 with the 1986 From Beyond film, loosely adapted from H.P. Lovecraft’s story of the same title by Brian Yuzna & Dennis Paoli; Screenplay by Dennis Paoli; directed by Stuart Gordon. Spoilers ahead, and content warnings for implied sexual assault, deeply non-consensual on-screen groping and mind control, and a lot of people getting their heads bitten off/brains eaten.

[“Humans are such easy prey.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Messy Revisions: John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” Part 3

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we start on John Connolly’s “The Fractured Atlas,” first published in 2015 as part of Night Music: Nocturnes Volume II, with Part III: “Mud.” Spoilers ahead

[“As I said before, there’s all kinds of mud, some cleaner than others.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

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