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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

More Hungry Houses: Oliver Onions’ “The Beckoning Fair One”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Oliver Onions’ “The Beckoning Fair One,” first published in 1911 in his Widdershins collection. Spoilers ahead.

[“I don’t say I don’t love my work—when it’s done.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

What Walks Alone: Final Thoughts on The Haunting of Hill House

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we wrap up our discussion Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, including final thoughts from both of us and a little from Anne on the screen adaptations. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: Reading the Weird

Journeys End: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 10)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we finish Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959, with Chapter 9. Spoilers ahead.

[“It’s the only time anything’s ever happened to me. I liked it.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Lonely Hunter: Aimee Ogden’s “His Heart Is the Haunted House”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Aimee Ogden’s “His Heart is the Haunted House,” first published in Apparition Lit in July 2019. Spoilers ahead.

[“Salt and sage won’t keep the dead women out.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Go Forth and Face Your Lover: The Haunting of Hill House (Part 9)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 8 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead.

[“What do people really want with each other, as Nell asked me once; what use are other people?”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Monsters Trying to Dance: Gillian Daniels’ “Bobbie and Her Father”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Gillian Daniels’s “Bobbie and Her Father,” first published in the August 2020 issue of The Dark. CW for harm to children.

[“Nancy has a grasp like the weight of paper.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Her Suitcase Full of Ectoplasm: The Haunting of Hill House (Part 8)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 7 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead.

[“The spirits dwelling in this house may be actually suffering because they are aware that you are afraid of them.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Hazards of a Cat Shortage: Garry Kilworth’s “Hogfoot Right and Bird Hands”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Garry Kilworth’s “Hogfoot Right and Bird-Hands,” first published in 1987 in Christopher Evans and Robert Holdstock’s Other Edens anthology. Spoilers ahead; CW for amputation and mention of suicide.

[“It would perch on the back of the bed-chair and flutter its fingerfeathers…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Never a Mother: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 7)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 6 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead.

[“Her eyes hurt with tears against the screaming blackness of the path…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Pinkerton’s Detergent Vs. the Eternal Bloodstain: Oscar Wilde’s “The Canterville Ghost”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Oscar Wilde’s “The Canterville Ghost,” first published in the 23 February and 2 March 1887 issues of The Court and Society Review. Spoilers ahead—but read it for yourself first.

[“I will take the furniture and the ghost at a valuation.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Center of Attention: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 6)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 5 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead.

[“It is still perfectly possible that it is all caused by subterranean waters.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

An Inexhaustible Research Subject: Elizabeth Bear’s “On Safari in R’lyeh and Carcosa With Gun and Camera”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Elizabeth Bear’s “On Safari in R’lyeh and Carcosa With Gun and Camera,” first published in the November 2020 on Tor.com. Spoilers ahead—but read it for yourself first.

[“Have you noticed that those are a lot of moons?”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Foolishness and Wickedness Mixed Up: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 5)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 4 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead. TW for continued discussion of historical suicide.

[Read more]

Series: Reading the Weird

Sometimes the Sea, Sometimes Bones: Sonya Taaffe’s “Tea With the Earl of Twilight”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Sonya Taaffe’s “Tea With the Earl of Twilight,” first published in the September 2020 issue of Nightmare Magazine. Spoilers ahead—but go read it for yourself first, we’ll wait.

[“It had been a wet, dispiriting winter full of gusts and mists, but with January the water had finally hardened into a thick pane of cormorant-black ice, chipped and glossed with refreezing like volcanic glass…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Tales to Tell at a Marshmallow Roast: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 4)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Today we’re covering Chapter 3. Spoilers ahead. TW for historical suicide.

[“Ladies, if you are the ghostly inhabitants of Hill House, I am here forever.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

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