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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

You Meet a Man in an Inn: Jean Ray’s “The Mainz Psalter”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Jean Ray’s “The Mainz Psalter,” first published as “le Psautier de Mayence” in Le Bien Public in May 1930, and translated into English by Lowell Blair for the Ghouls in My Grave collection in 1965. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Word of Flesh and Soul

The language of the originators defines reality, every word warping the world to fit its meaning. Its study transforms the mind and body, and is closely guarded by stodgy, paranoid academics. These hidebound men don’t trust many students with their secrets, especially not women, and more especially not “madwomen.” Polymede and her lover Erishti believe they’ve made a discovery that could blow open the field’s unexamined assumptions, and they’re ready to face expulsion to make their mark. Of course, if they’re wrong, the language will make its mark on them instead.

[Read “The Word of Flesh and Soul”]

Hope is a Thing With Scales: Samantha Henderson’s “Maybe the Stars”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Samantha Henderson’s “Maybe the Stars,” first published in the August 23rd 2012 episode of Drabblecast. Spoilers ahead—but it’s short and awesome and we highly recommend reading/listening to the original first. Follow those links!

[“My people came from the stars in the beginning, and the older I get, the louder they call.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Interview With a Thing Man Wasn’t Meant To Know: John Shirley’s “The Witness in Darkness”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading John Shirley’s “The Witness in Darkness,” first published in 2014 in S.T. Joshi’s The Madness of Cthulhu, Volume 1 anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“Even now the mountains sing, with a melancholic sadness in their voicings… of what might have been.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Kentucky Bourbon and Elder Signs: Alter Reiss’s “In the Forest of the Night”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Alter Reiss’s “In the Forest of the Night,” first published in the March 2015 issue of the Lovecraft E-Zine. Spoilers ahead; go check out the original, it’s a quick read and has shimmer spiders.

[“And who is this,” said the long-necked paneron…]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dreams Come True (Unfortunately): E.F. Benson’s “The Room in the Tower”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading E.F. Benson’s “The Room in the Tower,” first published in Benson’s The Room in the Tower and Other Stories in 1912. Trigger Warning for suicide, treated as a symptom of Evil. Spoilers ahead.

[“Jack will show you your room: I have given you the room in the tower.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Ulthar in the Fourth Dimension: Hagiwara Sakutarō’s “The Town of Cats”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Hagiwara Sakutarō’s “The Town of Cats,” first published in 1935 as Nekomachi; the English version in The Weird was translated by Jeffrey Angles and originally appeared in Modanizumu in 2008. Spoilers ahead.

[“…they had to give painstaking attention to their actions to make sure they harmonized with the reigning atmosphere…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Poetic Raptures, Opium, and Necromancy: Edgar Allen Poe’s “Ligeia”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Edgar Allen Poe’s “Ligeia,” first published in the September 1838 issue of The American Museum of Science, Literature, and the Arts. Spoilers ahead.

[“Here was indeed the triumph of all things heavenly…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Old Powers Rising: Nadia Bulkin’s “Pro Patria”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Nadia Bulkin’s “Pro Patria,” first published in 2015 in Joseph S. Pulver’s Cassilda’s Song anthology. Spoilers ahead. Trigger warning for suicide.

[“Joseph Garanga watched a small brown gecko crawl, belly to the wood, across the open window sill…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Financial Tips From the Dreamlands: Lovecraft and Barlow’s “The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lovecraft and R.H. Barlow’s “The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast,” written in 1933 and first published in Necronomicon Press’s The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast and One Other in 1994. Spoilers ahead.

[“Unconcernedly munching something the priests had given It was a large pudgy creature very hard to describe, and covered with short grey fur…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Publish and Perish: Ada Hoffman’s “The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ada Hoffman’s “The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library,” first published in December 2013 in Strange Horizons and later collected in Hoffman’s Monsters in My Mind. Spoilers ahead.

[“In the Fourth Year of the Hydra, the Mother of All Squid built a library.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Get Ready to Twirl Your Mustaches: H.P. Lovecraft’s “Sweet Ermengarde”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lovecraft’s own “Sweet Ermengarde, Or, The Heart of a Country Girl,” written between 1919 and 1921 and first published in Arkham House’s 1943 Beyond the Wall of Sleep collection. Spoilers ahead.

[“She was about 5ft 5.33…in tall, weighed 115.47 lbs. on her father’s corn scales…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Rolling the Bones: Ray Bradbury’s “Skeleton”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ray Bradbury’s “Skeleton,” first published in the September 1945 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“His heart cringed from the fanning motion of ribs like pale spiders crouched and fiddling with their prey.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dependency! Dependency! Joanna Russ’s “The Little Dirty Girl”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Joanna Russ’s “The Little Dirty Girl,” first published in 1982 in Terri Windling and Mark Alan Arnold’s Elsewhere, volume 2 anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“Oh yes I do,” said the Little Clean Girl. “I live up the hill and under the hill and over the hill and behind the hill.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

A Little Dark Reading: Margaret Irwin’s “The Book”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Margaret Irwin’s “The Book,” first published in 1930 in The London Mercury and collected in The Weird (Tor Books, 2012). Spoilers ahead.

[“From among this neat new clothbound crowd there towered here and there a musty sepulchre of learning…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

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