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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

Necromancy for Fun and/or Profit: Vivian Shaw’s “Black Matter”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Vivian Shaw’s “Black Matter,” first published in July 2019 in Pseudopod. Spoilers ahead!

[“People have described it as sweet…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Things We Wish Were Metaphors: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 12)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 13: Beaux Arts, Bitches. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[Read more]

Series: Reading the Weird

Never Save Me: Carlie St. George’s “Forward, Victoria”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Carlie St. George’s “Forward, Victoria,” first published in the April 2021 issue of The Dark. It’s currently up for a Shirley Jackson, and well worth your read. Spoilers ahead!

[“It’s strange how many children are unhappy when you murder their parents.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Defying, or at Least Neglecting, Gravity: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 11)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 12: They Don’t Have Cities There. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“There are wonders you can’t imagine…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Trick or… Something: John Langan’s “Kore”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover John Langan’s “Kore,” first published in the K. Allen Wood’s 2014 Shock Totem: Holiday Tales of the Macabre and Twisted anthology. You can find it most recently in Langan’s Corpsemouth and Other Autobiographies collection. Spoilers ahead!

[“Oh Ancient Power,” I said, “we bring offerings for your honor…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

No “I” in Team, No “We” Either: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 10)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 11: So, About That Whole Teamwork Thing. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“In Plato’s stories, Atlantis was swallowed up…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Wise Up, Schlubcraft: Cast a Deadly Spell

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week is our 400th post, and by tradition we’re watching the weird: 1991’s Cast a Deadly Spell, screenplay by Joseph Dougherty and Martin Campbell directing. Spoilers ahead!

[“I’m the guy who knows. Just about the only guy who knows it all, and who’s still breathing.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Avatar of the NIMBYs: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 9)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 10: Make Staten Island Grate Again(st Sao Paulo). The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead! Content warning for attempted rape, neonazis, and racial slurs.

[“Manhattan is scary to contemplate up close… but from this safe distance, it is a jewel to behold.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Penelope, Still Waiting: Sonya Taaffe’s “As the Tide Came Flowing In”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Sonya Taaffe’s “As the Tide Came Flowing In,” first published in Taaffe’s 2022 collection of the same title. Spoilers ahead, but well worth your read!

[“Her dreams were full of monstrous things…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Eldritch Angel Investors From Hell: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 8)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 9: A Better New York Is in Sight. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“People who say change is impossible are usually pretty happy with things just as they are.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

There’s Always a Catch: Tananarive Due’s “The Wishing Pool”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Tananarive Due’s “The Wishing Pool,” first published the July/August 2021 issue of Uncanny Magazine. Spoilers ahead!

[“Joy nearly got lost on the root-knotted red dirt path…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Interdimensional Rap Battle: N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 7)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 8: No Sleep in (or Near) Brooklyn. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“I’m the core of this city, either live or compost.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Don’t Trust Things in Holes: Gemma Files’ “The Harrow”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Gemma Files’ “The Harrow,” first published in The Children of Old Leach in 2014; we found it in Scott R. Jones’s Cthonic: Weird Tales of Inner Earth anthology. Spoilers ahead!

[“what we don’t understand, we fear… ”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Non-Euclidean Geometry Saves the Day: N. K. Jemisin’s The City We Became (Part 6)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became with Chapter 7 and the 3rd Interruption. The novel was first published in March 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“When she turns, he hears the melodies of a thousand different instruments…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

If You Prick Us, Do We Not Rust? Tara Campbell’s “Spencer”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Tara Campbell’s “Spencer,” first published in the March 2020 issue of Speculative City, and now available in Campbell’s Cabinet of Wrath: A Doll Collection. Spoilers ahead!

[“I only needed something small from her, something she would barely miss.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

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