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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
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Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

Meddle Not in the Affairs…: John Langan’s “Breakwater”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover John Langan’s “Breakwater,” first published in Robert S. Wilson’s 2018 Ashes and Entropy anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“When she was ready to kill Louise Westerford, she zipped her raincoat and stepped out into the storm.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

One Person’s Hell Dimension: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 10

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 19-20 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[the light makes things alive]

Series: Reading the Weird

Problems at the Lodge: Brian Evenson’s “No Matter Which Way We Turned”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Brian Evenson’s “No Matter Which Way We Turned,” first published in People Holding in May 2016. Spoilers ahead for a very short story.

[“After a while we couldn’t hardly bear to look at her.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Extradimensional Rubber Bands: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 9

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 17-18 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“When there is a portal to hell or Narnia lurking upstairs, you tend to fall behind on your blogging.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Stepford Pets: Lisa Tuttle’s “Replacements”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Lisa Tuttle’s “Replacements,” first published in 1992 in Dennis Etchison’s Metahorror anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“How would you feel about keeping a pet?”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Could Be Worse… We Guess: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 8

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 15-16 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead!

[“Maybe it’s the willows. Maybe they got their roots into you and they’re dragging you back.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Party at the Beginning of the End of the World: Livia Llewellyn’s “Bright Crown of Glory”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Livia Llewellyn’s “Bright Crown of Joy,” first published in Ellen Datlow’s Children of Lovecraft anthology in 2016, and reprinted last year in Nick Mamatas’s Wonder and Glory Forever anthology. Spoilers ahead, but this one is very much worth tracking down and reading yourself.

[“After the After, there were waves of tsunamis that circled the surface of the world…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Hugging the Taxidermy: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 7

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 13-14 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead—but we strongly recommend reading along!

[“Our society doesn’t teach us a graceful way to handle the aftermath of incredibly stressful events.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

No Drivel About Mysteries: Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Horror of the Heights”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Horror of the Heights,” first published in the November 1913 issue of The Strand. Spoilers ahead.

[“The whole aspect of this monster was formidable and threatening…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

The Power of Earworms and Petty Anger: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 6

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 11-12 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead—but we strongly recommend reading along!

[“…maybe time moved jaggedly in this world, or the sun didn’t rise until the willows were ready for it.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Floral Hazards: Wendy N. Wagner’s “The Black Azalea”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Wendy N. Wagner’s “The Black Azalea,” first published in the Mike Davis’s 2016 Autumn Cthulhu anthology. Spoilers ahead. Content warning for cancer and animal death.

[“Perhaps waking up to apocalyptic sci-fi had put her in a dispirited mood…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Sleep Tight: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 5

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 9-10 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead—but we strongly recommend reading along!

[“…for all I know, sometimes I do see ghosts, and they’re just blurry like everybody else.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Change Your Clocks, Change the World: Robert Levy’s “DST (Fall Back)”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Robert Levy’s “DST (Fall Back,” first published in the Mike Davis’s 2016 Autumn Cthulhu anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“Starlight and stridulations. Together they open windows. But only inside the gifted hour.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

I Don’t Think We’re in Narnia Any More: T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, Part 4

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Chapters 7-8 of T. Kingfisher’s The Hollow Places, first published in 2020. Spoilers ahead—but we strongly recommend reading along!

[“We’re in the woods between the worlds and we’ve lost track of which one is ours…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Always Be Closing: Margaret St. Clair’s “The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we cover Margaret St. Clair’s “The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles,” first published in the October 1951 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. You can find it in The Weird, among other collections. Spoilers ahead.

[“…for the first time Mortensen felt a definite qualm.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

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