Tor.com content by

Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [9]
All

Fiction and Excerpts [9]

Winter Tide: Chapter 5

, || After attacking Devil’s Reef in 1928, the U.S. government rounded up the people of Innsmouth and took them to the desert, far from their ocean, their Deep One ancestors, and their sleeping god Cthulhu. Only Aphra and Caleb Marsh survived the camps, and they emerged without a past or a future.

Winter Tide: Chapter 4

, || After attacking Devil’s Reef in 1928, the U.S. government rounded up the people of Innsmouth and took them to the desert, far from their ocean, their Deep One ancestors, and their sleeping god Cthulhu. Only Aphra and Caleb Marsh survived the camps, and they emerged without a past or a future.

Resistance is Futile: Peter Watts’s “The Things”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Peter Watts’s “The Things,” first published in the January 2010 issue of Clarkesworld. Spoilers ahead.

[“Mutinous biomass sloughed off despite my most desperate attempts to hold myself together: panic-stricken little clots of meat, instinctively growing whatever limbs they could remember and fleeing across the burning ice.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Never Mess With the Trees, Part 2: Nathan Carson and Sam Ford’s “The Willows”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Nathan Carson and Sam Ford’s adaptation of Algernon Blackwood’s “The Willows”. Issue 1 came out in November 2017, and #2 will be out in February (not June as originally reported). Spoilers ahead, but minimal for #2.

[“We had ‘strayed’, as Hala put it, into some region where the risks were great, yet unintelligible to us…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Never Mess With the Trees: Algernon Blackwood’s “The Willows”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Algernon Blackwood’s “The Willows,” first published in his 1907 collection, The Listener and Other Stories. Spoilers ahead.

[“…the fascination of this singular world of willows, winds, and waters, instantly laid its spell upon us both…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

We Warned You Not to Trust the Mushrooms: Marc Laidlaw’s “Leng”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Marc Laidlaw’s “Leng,” first published in Ellen Datlow’s Lovecraft Unbound anthology in 2009. Spoilers ahead.

[“No adventurer has ever followed lightly in the footsteps of a missing survey team…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Let Me Tell You About My Dream: H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Very Old Folk”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Very Old Folk,” first appearing as a letter to Donald Wandrei on November 3 1927, and first published in the Summer 1940 issue of Scienti-Snaps. Spoilers ahead.

[“For many nights there had been a hollow drumming on the hills…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Against Plushies: J. R. Hamantaschen’s “Cthulhu, Zombies, Ninjas and Robots!”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at J.R. Hamantaschen’s “Cthulhu, Zombies, Ninjas and Robots!: or, a Special Snowflake in an Endless Scorching Universe,” first published (we think) in his 2015 collection, With a Voice That is Often Still Confused But is Becoming Ever LOUDER and Clearer. Spoilers ahead.

[“The words and wisdom of H.P. Lovecraft are best enjoyed alone. Nay, they can only be savored when alone.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dear Reader, Run Away Now: Tamsyn Muir’s “The Woman in the Hill”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Tamsyn Muir’s “The Woman in the Hill,” first published in 2015 in Lynn Jamneck’s Dreams From the Witch House anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“There were things in the alcoves but she said she had not touched them…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Luckily I Understood Coptic Perfectly Well That Night: Theophile Gautier’s “The Mummy’s Foot”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Theophile Gautier’s “The Mummy’s Foot” (“Le Pied de momie”), first published in the September 1840 issue of Le Musée des familles. We read the translation by Lafcadio Hearn. Spoilers ahead.

[“I placed the foot of the divine Princess Hermonthis upon a heap of papers scribbled over with verses…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Delirious Stars and Fungous Scarecrows: Thomas Ligotti’s “The Shadow at the Bottom of the World”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Thomas Ligotti’s “The Shadow at the Bottom of the World,” first published in his 1991 collection Grimscribe: His Lives and Works. Spoilers ahead.

[“On the calendars which hung in so many of our homes, the monthly photograph illustrated the spirit of the numbered days below it…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Everything’s Cyclopean: Laird Barron’s “Shiva, Open Your Eye”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Laird Barron’s “Shiva, Open Your Eye,” first published in the September 2001 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and later collected in Barron’s The Imago Sequence and Other Stories. Spoilers ahead.

[“A majority of the things I might tell are secrets.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Michel Mauvais and the Sorcerer’s Stone: H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Alchemist”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Lovecraft’s own “The Alchemist,” first published in the November 1916 issue of The United Amateur. Spoilers ahead.

[“It told of a certain ancient man who had once dwelt on our estates…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Gardens at the End of the World: John Langan’s “The Shallows”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at John Langan’s “The Shallows,” first published in 2010 in Cthulhu’s Reign. Spoilers ahead.

[“The vast rectangle that occupied the space where his neighbor’s green-sided house had stood…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Living Sensibly With the Dead: E.F. Benson’s “How Fear Departed From the Long Gallery”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at E.F. Benson’s “How Fear Departed From the Long Gallery,” first published in his 1912 collection, The Room in the Tower and Other Stories. Spoilers ahead.

[“Church-Peveril is a house so beset and frequented by spectres, both visible and audible…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Terrible Pickup Lines of the Dead: Mary Rickert’s “Journey Into the Kingdom”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Mary Rickert’s “Journey Into the Kingdom,” first published in Fantasy and Science Fiction in 2006. Spoilers ahead.

[“The first ghost to come to my mother was my own father…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Elder Gods Make Terrible Babysitters: Nadia Bulkin’s “Red Goat Black Goat”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Nadia Bulkin’s “Red Goat Black Goat,” first published in the June 2010 issue of Innsmouth Free Press. Spoilers ahead.

[“We can’t trust people from outside the family,” Putri said. “The Goat-Nurse says so.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread