Tor.com content by

Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [11]
All

Fiction and Excerpts [11]

Deep Roots

|| Book 2 in the Innsmouth Legacy series. Aphra Marsh, descendant of the People of the Water, must repopulate Innsmouth or risk seeing it torn down by greedy developers, but as she searches she discovers that people have been going missing...

Foolishness and Wickedness Mixed Up: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 5)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Chapter 4 of Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Spoilers ahead. TW for continued discussion of historical suicide.

[Read more]

Series: Reading the Weird

Sometimes the Sea, Sometimes Bones: Sonya Taaffe’s “Tea With the Earl of Twilight”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Sonya Taaffe’s “Tea With the Earl of Twilight,” first published in the September 2020 issue of Nightmare Magazine. Spoilers ahead—but go read it for yourself first, we’ll wait.

[“It had been a wet, dispiriting winter full of gusts and mists, but with January the water had finally hardened into a thick pane of cormorant-black ice, chipped and glossed with refreezing like volcanic glass…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Tales to Tell at a Marshmallow Roast: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 4)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Today we’re covering Chapter 3. Spoilers ahead. TW for historical suicide.

[“Ladies, if you are the ghostly inhabitants of Hill House, I am here forever.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

“All Houses Have a Place Like This”: Robert Aickman’s “The Stains”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Robert Aickman’s “The Stains,” first published in Ramsey Campbell’s 1980 New Terrors anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“It had been as if he still belonged to the human race…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

My Bedroom Used to Be the Embalming Room: The Haunting of Hill House (Part 3)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Today we’re covering Chapter 2. Spoilers ahead.

[“Perhaps someone had once hoped to lighten the air of the blue room in Hill House with a dainty wallpaper…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Something in the Water, Something in the Air: Kaaron Warren’s “The Diesel Pool”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Kaaron Warren’s “The Diesel Pool,” first published in 2017 in Steve Proposch, Christopher Sequira, and Bryce Stevens’ Cthulhu Deep Down Under, Volume 1. Spoilers ahead.

[“No one likes to come down here. Every door hides a ghost.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Following the Directions Too Far: The Haunting of Hill House (Part 2)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we continue with Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Today we’re covering Chapter 1, Parts 3-5. Spoilers ahead.

[“Sometimes the people who knock you down never turn once to look.”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Maybe Just Don’t Rob Graves: Louisa May Alcott’s “Lost in a Pyramid, or the Mummy’s Curse”

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re reading Louisa May Alcott’s “Lost in a Pyramid, or the Mummy’s Curse,” first published in Frank Leslie’s 1869 A New World. (We read it in Lisa Morton and Leslie S. Klinger’s new Weird Women: Classic Supernatural Fiction by Groundbreaking Female Writers 1852-1923.) Spoilers ahead.

[“You’ll be sorry for it, and so shall I, perhaps…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Good Ghost-Hunters are Hard to Find: Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (Part 1)

Welcome back to Reading the Weird, in which we get girl cooties all over weird fiction, cosmic horror, and Lovecraftiana—from its historical roots through its most recent branches.

This week, we’re starting on Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, first published in 1959. Today we’re covering Chapter 1, Parts 1 and 2. Spoilers ahead.

[“No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality…”]

Series: Reading the Weird

Taking a Baseball Bat to Cthulhu: Watching the First Two Episodes of Lovecraft Country

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re watching the first two episodes of Lovecraft Country, airing on HBO August 16 and 23, 2020. Spoilers ahead (but go watch first, because this show is amazing).

[“At the dawn of time, just for a moment, everything was where and as it should be…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Nature Is Boring: William Browning Spencer’s “The Essayist in the Wilderness”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading William Browning Spencer’s “The Essayist in the Wilderness,” first published in the May 2002 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and collected in the 2011 anthology New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird. Spoilers ahead.

[“I speak of the lonesome song of the crayfish…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Horror of Improper Preservation Technique: H.P. Lovecraft and Winifred V. Jackson’s “The Green Meadow”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading H.P. Lovecraft and Winifred V. Jackson’s “The Green Meadow,” written in 1918 and 1919 and first published in the Spring 1927 issue of The Vagrant. Spoilers ahead.

[“Though I saw about me objects which I could name—trees, grass, sea, and sky; I felt that their relation to me was not the same…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Things Man Should Still Avoid Knowing: Leonid N. Andreyev’s “Lazarus”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Leonid N. Andreyev’s “Lazarus,” first published in Russian in 1906. (Trying to find out the original publication venue when one doesn’t speak Russian is tough—reader insights welcome.) The version we read was translated by Avraham Yarmolinsky and first appeared in 1918 in Lazarus/The Gentleman from San Francisco. Spoilers ahead.

[“Only the great desert, enfolding the Holy City, came close to the threshold of his abode…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Art of Dematerialization: Nelly Geraldine García-Rosas’s “T’la-yub’s Head”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Nelly Geraldine García-Rosas’s “T’la-yub’s Head,” translated by Silvia Moreno-Garcia and first published in Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s and Paula R. Stiles’s 2015 She Walks in Shadows anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“There remains a door which we must watch because we are the key.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Our Privacy Notice has been updated to explain how we use cookies, which you accept by continuing to use this website. To withdraw your consent, see Your Choices.