Tor.com content by

Lorna Wallace

Seven Scary Sci-Fi Diseases That Thankfully Aren’t Real

The science fiction genre is endlessly creative, but that creatively isn’t only limited to cool future technologies and fantastical alien creatures. Science fiction is also rich with inventively horrible diseases, some of which exist light years away in the depths of fictional solar systems, while others have made their way to Earth. Either way, you’ll be glad these dreadful diseases have been plucked from the imagination and exist only on the page and screen. Buckle up—some of these are downright horrifying…

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After 10 Years, Gravity Falls Is Still as Funny and Heartfelt as Any Show on Television

Alex Hirsch’s Gravity Falls first premiered ten years ago and burned brilliantly for the two seasons it was on air before going out with a bang in 2016. The animated comedy-mystery follows twins Dipper and Mabel Pines (voiced by Jason Ritter and Kristen Schaal), who spend their summer vacation in the town of Gravity Falls working for their Grunkle Stan (voiced by Hirsch) at his tourist trap, The Mystery Shack. With the help of a journal which Dipper finds in the woods, the Pines twins begin to unravel the supernatural mysteries of the small town.

If you let this show pass you by at the time, then you should definitely remedy that and check it out now (it’s all on Disney+). Although it’s not an adult animation in the same way that shows like Rick and Morty and BoJack Horseman are, it definitely appeals to an older audience as well as kids (especially if you’re a comedy fan, given the delightful slate of guest stars who appear throughout the series, including Patton Oswalt, Chelsea Peretti, John Oliver, and “Weird Al” Yankovic, just to name a few.)

Gravity Falls is smart, hilarious, and heartfelt. From the initial premise it might seem like a simple Monster of the Week setup, but there’s a sophisticated overarching mystery lurking behind all of the creatively bizarre phenomena. Along with the fun monsters and adventure-driven storylines, there’s a stellar blend of clever and goofy humour, with in-jokes for viewers of all ages, lovably eccentric characters who are expertly voiced, and a setting and animation style that perfectly manages to balance bright whimsy with notes of truly dark creepiness.

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Five of the Best Zombie Movies from Around the World

The zombie genre has gone through peaks and troughs since George A. Romero’s seminal Night of the Living Dead (1968) but it continues to shamble onwards. And while the ratings and reviews for AMC’s long-running staple The Walking Dead (2010-2022) may be on a steady downwards trajectory, the popularity of zombie content produced in languages other than English is on the rise.

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Science Fiction Double Feature: Five Fun Book-and-Movie Pairings

If you love science fiction movies then there’s a very good chance you also love science fiction books. I certainly do. And of course, one easy way to match your on-screen entertainment to your on-page entertainment is to look to adaptations. Sure, the book is often better, but sometimes a story works brilliantly across both mediums. Ridley Scott’s The Martian is an equal match for Andy Weir’s novel. And I’ll be honest, I hadn’t read Frank Herbert’s Dune before seeing Denis Villeneuve’s recent adaptation, but the movie version finally gave me the kick I needed to dive into the original.

But sometimes I want a similar story or trope without the inevitable baggage of comparison that comes with adaptations. If, like me, you enjoy coordinating your reading and movie picks, then here are five book recommendations based on their parallels with popular sci-fi films. They may have less overlap than a direct adaptation, but the themes, settings, and storylines that connect these pairings resonate in interesting ways (and are fantastic in their own right)!

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