Tor.com content by

Anne M. Pillsworth

Fiction and Excerpts [3]
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Fiction and Excerpts [3]

Fathomless

, || Sean Wyndham has tried to stay away from the lure of magic—the last time he tried to dabble in the dark studies, he inadvertently summoned a blood familiar, wreaking havoc on his town, and calling the attention of the Elder Gods. But now Sean has been offered the chance to study magic with a proper teacher...

Summoned (Excerpt)

, || While browsing in a rare book store in Arkham, Sean finds an occult book with an ad seeking an apprentice sorcerer, from a newspaper dated March 21, 1895. Even more intriguing, the ad specifically requests applicants reply by email. Sean's always been interested in magic, particularly the Lovecraftian dark mythology. Against his best friend Edna's advice, he decides to answer the ad, figuring it's a clever hoax, but hoping that it won't be. The advertiser, Reverend Redemption Orne, claims to be a master of the occult born more than 300 years ago. To prove his legitimacy, Orne gives Sean instructions to summon a harmless but useful familiar—but Sean's ceremony takes a dark turn, and he instead accidentally beckons a bloodthirsty servant to the Cthulhu Mythos god Nyarlathotep. The ritual is preemptively broken, and now Sean must find and bind the servitor, before it grows too strong to contain. But strange things are already happening in the town of Arkham...

I’m Not Superstitious: Lisa Mannetti’s “Houdini: The Egyptian Paradigm”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lisa Mannetti’s “Houdini: The Egyptian Paradigm,” first published in Ashes and Entropy in 2018. Spoilers ahead.

[“Houdini is doomed.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Shadow Right on Time: Sonia Greene’s “Four O’clock”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Sonia Greene’s “Four O’Clock,” first published in Something About Cats and Other Pieces, edited by August Derleth, in 1949—but written considerably earlier. Some sources list Lovecraft as a co-author but there’s no particular evidence for this. Spoilers ahead.

[“The vapor each moment thickened and piled up…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Is There Such a Thing as Too Goth? — Everil Worrell’s “The Canal”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Everill Worrel’s “The Canal,” first published in the December 1927 issue of Weird Tales. And, um, accidentally also August Derleth’s 1947 revision, first published in his The Sleeping and the Dead anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Turning the Cyclopean Up to 11: Fiona Maeve Geist’s “Red Stars / White Snow / Black Metal”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Fiona Maeve Geist’s “Red Stars/White Snow/Black Metal,” first published in Robert S. Wilson’s Ashes and Entropy anthology in 2018. Spoilers ahead, but it’s worth reading on your own.

[“So Kelsey grasps the thread and finds herself across the Atlantic…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

No Mask? No Mask! — Mira Grant’s In the Shadow of Spindrift House

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Mira Grant’s In the Shadow of Spindrift House, released just this summer as a standalone novella from Subterranean Press. Spoilers ahead, really a lot of spoilers, go read the thing first. We’ll wait.

[“Humanity has sacrificed so much on the altar of geometry…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

It’s Not the Chosen One’s Job to Knock on Doors — The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we celebrate our 250th post by watching The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu, a 2009 comedy-horror flick directed by Henry Saine and scripted by Devin McGinn. Trigger warnings (in the movie, not the post) for bloody guts, rape jokes, and frequent obscenities including slurs. Spoilers ahead.

[“The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind.” — HPL]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

My Laugh is an Evil Laugh: Michael Chabon’s “The God of Dark Laughter”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Michael Chabon’s “The God of Dark Laughter,” first published in The New Yorker in April 2009. Spoilers ahead.

[“Damn you, Ganz,” I said, though I was not in truth addressing the poor fellow, who, I knew, would not be able to answer my question anytime soon. “What’s a dead clown doing in my woods?”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

A Massage From Beyond the Veil of Night: T.E.D. Klein’s “Nadelman’s God”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading T.E.D. Klein’s “Nadelman’s God,” first published in the Dark Gods collection in 1985. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Bantha Milk and Durian: Ng Yi-Sheng’s “Xingzhou”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ng Yi-Sheng’s “Xingzhou,” first published in the July 2019 issue of Clarkesworld. Spoilers ahead—but read it yourself first; you won’t be sorry!

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Jobs From Hell Would Be An Improvement: David Liss’s “The Doors that Never Close and the Doors that Are Always Open”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading David Liss’s “The Doors that Never Close and the Doors that Are Always Open,” first published in 2015 in Aaron J French’s The Gods of H. P. Lovecraft anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Spirit of the Century: Fritz Leiber’s “Smoke Ghost”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Fritz Leiber’s “Smoke Ghost,” first published in the October 1941 issue of Unknown Worlds. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Old Gods and Older: Premee Mohamed’s “Us and Ours”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Premee Mohamed’s “Us and Ours,” first published in Jennifer Brozek’s 2019 anthology A Secret Guide to Fighting Elder Gods. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Bad Ideas 101: David Barr Kirtley’s “The Disciple”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading David Barr Kirtley’s “The Disciple,” first published in the Summer 2002 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead–trigger warning for cruelty to animals.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

New Words to Wordless Songs: Nibedita Sen’s “We Sang You As Ours”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Nibedita Sen’s “We Sang You As Ours,” first published in the June 2019 issue of The Dark. Spoilers ahead—but go ahead and read it yourself; it’s short and awesome.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Still the Worst Color: Anya Martin’s “Old Tsah-Hov”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Anya Martin’s “Old Tsah-Hov,” first published in Joseph S. Pulver, Sr.’s Cassilda’s Song anthology in 2015. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

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