Tor.com content by

Anne M. Pillsworth

Fiction and Excerpts [3]
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Fiction and Excerpts [3]

Fathomless

, || Sean Wyndham has tried to stay away from the lure of magic—the last time he tried to dabble in the dark studies, he inadvertently summoned a blood familiar, wreaking havoc on his town, and calling the attention of the Elder Gods. But now Sean has been offered the chance to study magic with a proper teacher...

Summoned (Excerpt)

, || While browsing in a rare book store in Arkham, Sean finds an occult book with an ad seeking an apprentice sorcerer, from a newspaper dated March 21, 1895. Even more intriguing, the ad specifically requests applicants reply by email. Sean's always been interested in magic, particularly the Lovecraftian dark mythology. Against his best friend Edna's advice, he decides to answer the ad, figuring it's a clever hoax, but hoping that it won't be. The advertiser, Reverend Redemption Orne, claims to be a master of the occult born more than 300 years ago. To prove his legitimacy, Orne gives Sean instructions to summon a harmless but useful familiar—but Sean's ceremony takes a dark turn, and he instead accidentally beckons a bloodthirsty servant to the Cthulhu Mythos god Nyarlathotep. The ritual is preemptively broken, and now Sean must find and bind the servitor, before it grows too strong to contain. But strange things are already happening in the town of Arkham...

Hope is a Thing With Scales: Samantha Henderson’s “Maybe the Stars”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Samantha Henderson’s “Maybe the Stars,” first published in the August 23rd 2012 episode of Drabblecast. Spoilers ahead—but it’s short and awesome and we highly recommend reading/listening to the original first. Follow those links!

[“My people came from the stars in the beginning, and the older I get, the louder they call.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Interview With a Thing Man Wasn’t Meant To Know: John Shirley’s “The Witness in Darkness”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading John Shirley’s “The Witness in Darkness,” first published in 2014 in S.T. Joshi’s The Madness of Cthulhu, Volume 1 anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“Even now the mountains sing, with a melancholic sadness in their voicings… of what might have been.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Kentucky Bourbon and Elder Signs: Alter Reiss’s “In the Forest of the Night”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Alter Reiss’s “In the Forest of the Night,” first published in the March 2015 issue of the Lovecraft E-Zine. Spoilers ahead; go check out the original, it’s a quick read and has shimmer spiders.

[“And who is this,” said the long-necked paneron…]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dreams Come True (Unfortunately): E.F. Benson’s “The Room in the Tower”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading E.F. Benson’s “The Room in the Tower,” first published in Benson’s The Room in the Tower and Other Stories in 1912. Trigger Warning for suicide, treated as a symptom of Evil. Spoilers ahead.

[“Jack will show you your room: I have given you the room in the tower.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Ulthar in the Fourth Dimension: Hagiwara Sakutarō’s “The Town of Cats”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Hagiwara Sakutarō’s “The Town of Cats,” first published in 1935 as Nekomachi; the English version in The Weird was translated by Jeffrey Angles and originally appeared in Modanizumu in 2008. Spoilers ahead.

[“…they had to give painstaking attention to their actions to make sure they harmonized with the reigning atmosphere…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Poetic Raptures, Opium, and Necromancy: Edgar Allen Poe’s “Ligeia”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Edgar Allen Poe’s “Ligeia,” first published in the September 1838 issue of The American Museum of Science, Literature, and the Arts. Spoilers ahead.

[“Here was indeed the triumph of all things heavenly…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Old Powers Rising: Nadia Bulkin’s “Pro Patria”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Nadia Bulkin’s “Pro Patria,” first published in 2015 in Joseph S. Pulver’s Cassilda’s Song anthology. Spoilers ahead. Trigger warning for suicide.

[“Joseph Garanga watched a small brown gecko crawl, belly to the wood, across the open window sill…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Financial Tips From the Dreamlands: Lovecraft and Barlow’s “The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lovecraft and R.H. Barlow’s “The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast,” written in 1933 and first published in Necronomicon Press’s The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast and One Other in 1994. Spoilers ahead.

[“Unconcernedly munching something the priests had given It was a large pudgy creature very hard to describe, and covered with short grey fur…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Publish and Perish: Ada Hoffman’s “The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ada Hoffman’s “The Mother of All Squid Builds a Library,” first published in December 2013 in Strange Horizons and later collected in Hoffman’s Monsters in My Mind. Spoilers ahead.

[“In the Fourth Year of the Hydra, the Mother of All Squid built a library.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Get Ready to Twirl Your Mustaches: H.P. Lovecraft’s “Sweet Ermengarde”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lovecraft’s own “Sweet Ermengarde, Or, The Heart of a Country Girl,” written between 1919 and 1921 and first published in Arkham House’s 1943 Beyond the Wall of Sleep collection. Spoilers ahead.

[“She was about 5ft 5.33…in tall, weighed 115.47 lbs. on her father’s corn scales…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Rolling the Bones: Ray Bradbury’s “Skeleton”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Ray Bradbury’s “Skeleton,” first published in the September 1945 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“His heart cringed from the fanning motion of ribs like pale spiders crouched and fiddling with their prey.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dependency! Dependency! Joanna Russ’s “The Little Dirty Girl”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Joanna Russ’s “The Little Dirty Girl,” first published in 1982 in Terri Windling and Mark Alan Arnold’s Elsewhere, volume 2 anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“Oh yes I do,” said the Little Clean Girl. “I live up the hill and under the hill and over the hill and behind the hill.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

A Little Dark Reading: Margaret Irwin’s “The Book”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Margaret Irwin’s “The Book,” first published in 1930 in The London Mercury and collected in The Weird (Tor Books, 2012). Spoilers ahead.

[“From among this neat new clothbound crowd there towered here and there a musty sepulchre of learning…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Fungi From Bob’s Discount Beer: Stephen King’s “Gray Matter”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Stephen King’s “Gray Matter,” first published in the October 1973 issue of Cavalier and later collected in Night Shift. Spoilers ahead.

[“Can you feature that? The kid all by himself in that apartment with his dad turning into… well, into something… ”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Gate and the Key and the Paintbrush: Max Gladstone’s “Crispin’s Model”

  1. Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Max Gladstone’s “Crispin’s Model,” first published right here on Tor.com in October 2017. Spoilers ahead, but seriously, go read it first.

[“Craquelure legions danced in the fissures of my skin…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

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