Tor.com content by

Anne M. Pillsworth

Fiction and Excerpts [3]
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Fiction and Excerpts [3]

Fathomless

, || Sean Wyndham has tried to stay away from the lure of magic—the last time he tried to dabble in the dark studies, he inadvertently summoned a blood familiar, wreaking havoc on his town, and calling the attention of the Elder Gods. But now Sean has been offered the chance to study magic with a proper teacher...

Summoned (Excerpt)

, || While browsing in a rare book store in Arkham, Sean finds an occult book with an ad seeking an apprentice sorcerer, from a newspaper dated March 21, 1895. Even more intriguing, the ad specifically requests applicants reply by email. Sean's always been interested in magic, particularly the Lovecraftian dark mythology. Against his best friend Edna's advice, he decides to answer the ad, figuring it's a clever hoax, but hoping that it won't be. The advertiser, Reverend Redemption Orne, claims to be a master of the occult born more than 300 years ago. To prove his legitimacy, Orne gives Sean instructions to summon a harmless but useful familiar—but Sean's ceremony takes a dark turn, and he instead accidentally beckons a bloodthirsty servant to the Cthulhu Mythos god Nyarlathotep. The ritual is preemptively broken, and now Sean must find and bind the servitor, before it grows too strong to contain. But strange things are already happening in the town of Arkham...

A Language With Too Many “Awwww” Sounds: Vina Jie-Min Prasad’s “Black Flowers Blossom”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Vina Jie-Min Prasad’s “Black Flowers Blossom,” first published in the November/December 2019 issue of Uncanny. Spoilers ahead, but go read it yourself first (not at work, we suggest).

[“I do not offer myself freely to just anyone, even if they did save my life from an Outer Creature.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The World’s Always Been Ending: A. C. Wise’s “Venice Burning”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading A.C. Wise’s “Venice Burning,” first published in Jason Andrews’ 2015 anthology Apotheosis: Stories of Survival After the Rise of the Elder Gods. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Great Race, My Ass: Scott R. Jones’s “The Amnesiac’s Lament”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Scott R. Jones’s “The Amnesiac’s Lament,” first published in his 2019 collection Shout, Kill, Revel, Repeat. (Disclaimer: he was kind enough to send us copies, which we appreciated!) Spoilers ahead.

[“Ghosts don’t sleep, or wake up. They just are, and that’s all we are…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Lone Survivors, Telling Tales: S.L. Harris’s “Into the Eye”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading S. L. Harris’s “Into the Eye,” just published in the December 9th, 2019 issue of Strange Horizons. Spoilers ahead—but go read it first!

[“The stories of the sounds at the center of the universe are true.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Self-Renovating Haunted House: Madeline Yale Wynne’s “The Little Room”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Madeline Yale Wynne’s “The Little Room,” first published in the August 1895 issue of Harper’s Magazine. Spoilers ahead.

[“That little room has always been there,” said Aunt Hannah, “ever since the house was built.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Puppy’s Revenge: George R. R. Martin’s “Sandkings”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading George R. R. Martin’s “Sandkings,” first published in the August 1979 issue of Omni. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Dealing with the King: John Connolly’s “Razorshins”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading John Connolly’s “Razorshins,” first published in the July-August 2015 issue of Black Static. Spoilers ahead.

[“I’ll be wanting an extra bottle from you.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Things We Do For Course Credit: John Langan’s “Technicolor”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading John Langan’s “Technicolor,” first published in Ellen Datlow’s 2009 Poe: 19 New Tales Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe anthology. Spoilers ahead (but go read the whole creepy thing for yourself).

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Party Like It’s 1899: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death,” first published in the May 1842 issue of Graham’s Magazine. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Not Nervous or Imaginative, We Swear: F. Marion Crawford’s “The Screaming Skull”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading F. Marion Crawford’s “The Screaming Skull,” first published in the July 11th and 18th, 1908, issues of Collier’s. Spoilers ahead.

[“If I were you, I would never tell ugly stories about ingenious ways of killing people…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Hope Is the Thing With… — Simon Strantzas’s “Antripuu”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern— Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Simon Strantzas’s “Antripuu,” first published in the July 2019 issue of Nightmare Magazine. Spoilers ahead.

[“There are four of us left huddled in the cabin…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Lovecraft’s Faintest Fingerprints: C.M. Eddy Jr.’s and H.P. Lovecraft’s “Ashes”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading C. M. Eddy, Jr.’s and Lovecraft’s “Ashes,” first published in the March 1924 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“It has been your privilege to witness the first successful trial of a preparation that will revolutionize the world.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

I’m Not Superstitious: Lisa Mannetti’s “Houdini: The Egyptian Paradigm”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Lisa Mannetti’s “Houdini: The Egyptian Paradigm,” first published in Ashes and Entropy in 2018. Spoilers ahead.

[“Houdini is doomed.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Shadow Right on Time: Sonia Greene’s “Four O’clock”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Sonia Greene’s “Four O’Clock,” first published in Something About Cats and Other Pieces, edited by August Derleth, in 1949—but written considerably earlier. Some sources list Lovecraft as a co-author but there’s no particular evidence for this. Spoilers ahead.

[“The vapor each moment thickened and piled up…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Is There Such a Thing as Too Goth? — Everil Worrell’s “The Canal”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

This week, we’re reading Everill Worrel’s “The Canal,” first published in the December 1927 issue of Weird Tales. And, um, accidentally also August Derleth’s 1947 revision, first published in his The Sleeping and the Dead anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[Read more]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

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