Announcing That We May Live, a New Collection of Chinese SFF From Two Lines Press

A brand-new collection of Chinese speculative fiction is coming out next year! Two Lines Press has announced a new book series of translated works, and the very first entry is That We May Live: Speculative Chinese Fiction. 

According to a press release, each edition of Calico is curated around a “particular theme, region, language, historical moment, or style” and will be released every six months. That We May Live, which comes out in spring 2020, will feature seven short science fiction and fantasy stories by authors from mainland China and Hong Kong, while the as-yet-untitled second book, scheduled for fall 2020, will “focus on Arabic poetry that pushes boundaries and defies expectations.”

That We May Live: Speculative Chinese Fiction comes out March 10, 2020 from Two Lines Press. From the catalog copy:

A woman impulsively decides to visit her grandmother in a scene reminiscent of “Little Red Riding Hood,” only to find herself in a town of women obsessed with a mysterious fermented beverage. An aging and well-respected female newscaster at a provincial TV station finds herself caught up in an illicit affair with her boss, who insists that she recite the news while they have sex. An anonymous city prone to vanishing storefronts begins to plant giant mushrooms for its citizens to live in, with disastrous consequences.

That We May Live includes work from:

  • Dorothy Tse, translated by Natascha Bruce
  • Enoch Tam, translated by Jeremy Tiang
  • Zhu Hui, translated by Michael Day
  • Chan Chi Wa, translated by Audrey Heijns
  • Chen Si’an, translated by Canaan Morse
  • Yan Ge, translated by Jeremy Tiang

You can read an excerpt of the short story “Sour Meat,” by Dorothy Tse and translated by Natascha Bruce, on the Center for the Art of Translation’s website.

citation

2 Comments

Subscribe to this thread

Post a Comment

All comments must meet the community standards outlined in Tor.com's Moderation Policy or be subject to moderation. Thank you for keeping the discussion, and our community, civil and respectful.

Hate the CAPTCHA? Tor.com members can edit comments, skip the preview, and never have to prove they're not robots. Join now!

Our Privacy Notice has been updated to explain how we use cookies, which you accept by continuing to use this website. To withdraw your consent, see Your Choices.