Watch the First Teaser for Amazon Prime’s Adaptation of Garth Ennis’ The Boys

The first teaser for The Boys, Amazon Prime’s adaptation of Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson’s dark graphic novel about blue-collar vigilantes taking down corrupt superheroes, is a bit of in-universe programming: a commercial for Vought, the agency that manages caped crusaders through the kinds of careers more commonly seen for celebrities or politicians. It’s a short clip but nonetheless gives you a sense of the world that Eric Kripke (Supernatural) and Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg (Preacher) are adapting for television.

This particular teaser’s release during New York Comic-Con is well-timed to the series’ general presence at the convention; there’s a giant poster at the Javits Center reading “F*** SUPERHEROES” above a giant rant about reining in these godlike protectors who are more likely to use their superpowers and/or mythical weapons for their own gain.

Plus, a fun bit of casting news out of the con: Simon Pegg, long a fan favorite for the character of Wee Hughie, will indeed join the series—but as the father of Wee Hughie, played by The Hunger Games’ Jack Quaid.

The official synopsis, from Amazon Prime:

In a world where superheroes embrace the darker side of their massive celebrity and fame, The Boys centers on a group of vigilantes known informally as “The Boys,” who set out to take down corrupt superheroes with no more than their blue-collar grit and a willingness to fight dirty. The Boys is a fun and irreverent take on what happens when superheroes—who are as popular as celebrities, as influential as politicians and as revered as Gods—abuse their superpowers rather than use them for good. It’s the powerless against the super powerful as The Boys embark on a heroic quest to expose the truth about “The Seven,” and Vought—the multi-billion dollar conglomerate that manages these superheroes.

The Boys will premiere sometime in 2019.

citation

4 Comments

Subscribe to this thread

Post a Comment

All comments must meet the community standards outlined in Tor.com's Moderation Policy or be subject to moderation. Thank you for keeping the discussion, and our community, civil and respectful.

Hate the CAPTCHA? Tor.com members can edit comments, skip the preview, and never have to prove they're not robots. Join now!

Our Privacy Notice has been updated to explain how we use cookies, which you accept by continuing to use this website. To withdraw your consent, see Your Choices.