Sherlock Rewrites Watson’s Stories in the Mr. Holmes Trailer

“I told Watson, if I ever write a story myself, it will be to correct the millions of misconceptions created by his imagination.”

This is the slightly grumpy mindset that spurs on a 93-year-old Sherlock Holmes to reopen his last case in the trailer for Mr. Holmes. Based on Mitch Cullin’s novel A Slight Trick of the Mind, the movie sees Ian McKellen as the Great Detective in self-imposed exile disguised as retirement, flirting with the past by occasionally revisiting 221B Baker Street, and ultimately turning to that notoriously unsolved mystery. If it hasn’t won you over yet, Mr. Holmes looks very intriguing.

But with every trailer and clip that’s been released, we have to ask: Is Watson dead, or just not part of this story? The trailer mentions Watson leaving 30 years before the film begins, so did they have a falling out? (This is important information that we need to know.) Holmes tells his housekeeper’s son that when he failed to solve the case and forced himself into retirement, Watson wrote a different (and, one would presume, happy) ending. Now, it’s up to Holmes, with his rapidly decreasing faculties, to set things right.

Here’s the official synopsis:

Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world’s most famous detective. In 1947, an aging Sherlock Holmes returns from a journey to Japan, where, in search of a rare plant with powerful restorative qualities, he has witnessed the devastation of nuclear warfare. Now, in his remote seaside farmhouse, Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper and her young son, Roger.

Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement, and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love—before it’s too late.

Watch the trailer:

Mr. Holmes comes out of retirement on June 19.

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