’s Hugo and Nebula-Eligible Fiction from 2014

Awards season is upon us, with nominations open for both the Hugos and Nebulas. With nomination deadlines coming up in February and March, we would like to take this opportunity to remind you of’s awards-eligible works from 2014.

We are tremendously proud of our authors, illustrators, and editors for creating such wonderful novellas, novelettes, short stories, graphic stories, and illustrations this year. We hope that you will nominate your favorite stories for the Hugos, Nebulas, and other upcoming awards which honor outstanding works of science fiction, fantasy, and horror—but most of all, we hope that you have enjoyed reading these works as much as we have!

As a reminder, you can download our free anthology Some of the Best From from your favorite ebook retailer.

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Tiamat’s Terrain: Comics that Traverse the World

I didn’t mean to fall into comics at the beginning of 2015, but sometimes that’s just the way the wind blows. And these comics, hailing from France, Italy, Cyprus, and America, traverse the whole world, entering unexpected longitudes and latitudes.

Intriguingly, the content that takes the reader into far-flung corners of the globe reflects the authors’ own travels and lineages: Squarzoni, a French graphic novelist who worked in ex-Yugoslavia, has traveled through Mexico, Palestine, and Israel as a human-rights observer and has published work on Central American politics and the Holocaust; the Italian, Hugo Pratt, inducted in 2004 to the Will Eisner Hall of Fame, lived in Argentina, London, Italy, Switzerland, and France, while also traveling Patagonia, Canada, and Africa; Wilson is an American who lived and worked for a time in Cairo; Hoplaros grew up in Zimbabwe before moving back to her home-country, Cyprus; and Sattouf, who used to write for Charlie Hebdo, is a French-Syrian who spent his childhood in Algeria, Libya, and Syria. With well-traveled captains like these at the helm, you know you’re in for a rip-roaring ride.

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Series: Tiamat’s Terrain

Don’t Touch That Dial: Midseason SFF

Caped crusaders not enough for you? Need an SFF fix? Well, you’re in luck. On our second misdseason installment of “Don’t Touch That Dial,” let’s take a gander at a time-traveller trying to prevent the end of the world (12 Monkeys), an exorcist with a chip on his shoulder trying to prevent the end of the world (Constantine), and a pair of holy witnesses trying to prevent the end of the world (Sleepy Hollow). I’m sensing a theme here…

[“Without the threat of apocalypse, what is my place in the world?”]

The Apex Book of World SF 4, Edited by Mahvesh Murad, Coming in 2015

Lavie Tidhar, editor of the The Apex Book of World SF anthologies, announced today that he and Apex Book Company would be releasing The Apex Book of World SF 4, tentatively scheduled for later this year. Since 2008, each volume has collected international speculative fiction, both in translation and published originally in English.

But whereas Tidhar has edited the last three anthologies, this time around he’s introducing us to the series’ new editor: Mahvesh Murad, book reviewer, radio host, and the voice of’s new podcast, Midnight in Karachi.

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This 4-Hour The Hobbit Recut Focuses on Bilbo Baggins, Like It Should Have All Along

Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy has been concluded for barely a month, but already one ambitious Tolkien fan has recut the bloated, eight-hour adaptation into a much more manageable affair clocking in at a little less than four and a half hours. How did the anonymous TolkienEditor do it? By cutting out the Tauriel/Legolas/Kili love triangle and by bringing us back to the movie’s star, who we forgot to care about along the way: Bilbo Baggins.

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Extraction and Rebellion Sweepstakes!

Stephanie Diaz’s debut novel, Extraction, kicked off the trilogy that continues with Rebellion, out on February 10th from St. Martin’s Press. We want to send you a galley of Rebellion, along with a copy of Extraction, so that you can catch up with the adventure right now right now!

The Extraction trilogy takes place on Kiel after the destruction of the ozone layer. The world’s population has retreated into the planet’s layers in order to survive, and the elite citizenry who live safely in the planet’s Core control the fates of those forced to work on the perilous Surface.

Check out our Pop Quiz at the End of the Universe with Diaz here, and then comment in the post below to enter!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A purchase does not improve your chances of winning. Sweepstakes open to legal residents of 50 United States and D.C., and Canada (excluding Quebec). To enter, comment on this post beginning at 3:30 PM Eastern Time (ET) on January 21. Sweepstakes ends at 12:00 PM ET on January 25. Void outside the United States and Canada and where prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules here. Sponsor:, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010.

A Darker Shade of Magic (Excerpt)

Kell is one of the last Travelers—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel universes.

There’s Grey London, dirty and boring, without any magic, ruled by a mad King George. There’s Red London, where life and magic are revered, and the Maresh Dynasty presides over a flourishing empire. White London, a place where people fight to control magic, and the magic fights back, draining the city to its very bones. And once upon a time, there was Black London…but no one speaks of that now.

Officially, Kell is the Red Traveler, personal ambassador and adopted Prince of Red London, carrying the monthly correspondences between the royals of each London. Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see—a dangerous hobby, and one that has set him up for accidental treason.

Fleeing into Grey London, Kell runs afoul of Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations, who first robs him, then saves him from a dangerous enemy, and then forces him to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure. But perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save all of the worlds, Kell and Lila will first need to stay alive—and that is proving trickier than they hoped.

From V.E. Schwab comes a new universe of daring adventure, thrilling power, and parallel Londons, beginning with A Darker Shade of Magic—available February 24th from Tor Books (US) and February 27th from Titan (UK).

[Read an Excerpt]

Rereading Melanie Rawn: The Star Scroll, Chapters 17 and 18

Welcome to the weekly Wednesday reread of The Star Scroll! This week we have murder, mayhem, a knife fight, a royal board meeting, and a whole lot of plots getting as thick as fantasy stew.

Chapter 17

So This Happens: Pandsala is granted an audience with Kiele. Pandsala is emphatically not amused to be kept waiting, and even less amused to have her nose rubbed in Kiele’s married state. But she has a purpose, and she gets right to it: she tells Kiele that Masul’s real father has surfaced and approached Naydra for money.

The game goes back and forth for a while, with Kiele pretending surprise and Pandsala laying it on somewhat thick. The conversation then shifts to Chiana, and how the plot to present Masul as Roelstra’s son means presenting Chiana as a servant’s child. Kiele seems astonished.

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Series: Rereading Melanie Rawn

The Illogic of Fairy Tales

The trouble with fairy tales is that they’re not fair.

They seem fair enough at first: do the right thing, and you will be rewarded. Be nice to the old woman, help the trapped animals, work hard, get your mother’s blessing, and you can be the lucky child who wins a kingdom, marries the prince/princess, and lives happily ever after. But that all depends on the protagonist having drawn the right combination of cards in the first place: he or she is the lucky third or seventh child, and has a fairy godmother or patron witch, and is a nice person in the first place.

[You only get through a fairy tale by following the rules]

Creatureville: The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen

Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen proposes that places, like people, have particular interests. Some specialise in film; some in food. Others areas boast about an abundance of athletes, or artists, or authors. The small town of Rabbit Back “was known to have no less than six writers’ associations, and that was without counting the most noteworthy writers’ association, the Rabbit Back Literature Society, which accepted members only at Laura White’s invitation.”

Laura White is an almost mythical figure in the Finland of this baffling but beautiful English-language debut, which is fitting considering the contents of her Creatureville series:

The local ceramicists for the most part produced water sprites, pixies, elves, and gnomes. Laura White had made these creatures popular all over the world through her children’s books, but in Rabbit Back in particular you ran into them everywhere you looked. They were presented as prizes in raffles, given as presents, brought to dinner as hostess gifts. There was only one florist in Rabbit Back, but there were seven shops that sold mostly mythological figurines.

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