The End of the End of Everything April 23, 2014 The End of the End of Everything Dale Bailey How do you face ruin? Cold Wind April 16, 2014 Cold Wind Nicola Griffith Old ways can outlast their usefulness. What Mario Scietto Says April 15, 2014 What Mario Scietto Says Emmy Laybourne An original Monument 14 story. Something Going Around April 9, 2014 Something Going Around Harry Turtledove A tale of love and parasites.
From The Blog
April 23, 2014
The Light at the End of GrimDark: 13 Life-Affirming Fantasies
Leah Schnelbach
April 22, 2014
The Star Wars Expanded Universe is Not Going Away Because of Episode VII
Emily Asher-Perrin
April 22, 2014
Writing Without Revealing Gender
Alex Dally MacFarlane
April 19, 2014
Announcing the 2014 Hugo Award Nominees
Tor.com
April 18, 2014
Wings Gleaming Like Beaten Bronze: Elizabeth Bear’s Eternal Sky Trilogy
Liz Bourke
Thu
Apr 24 2014 4:50pm

Dragon Age Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition received a new trailer and a release date this week, and from what we’ve seen so far, the game continues to look incredibly promising. In addition to the trailer’s release date announcement and the showcasing of some incredible next-gen graphics, we learned that BioWare is giving their dragon combat system a complete makeover. (Hint: anyone remember Soldier of Fortune II?)

[“Whatever we were before, we are now... the Inquisition.”]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 4:00pm

I was first handed Sylvie and Bruno when I was an eager kid just coming off of Alice in Wonderland, certain—certain—that this omnibus edition of Lewis Carroll, which the cover said contained everything that Carroll ever wrote (which turned out to be true; it even included various mathematical puzzles) would be sure to have lots and lots of jokes and funny conversations and funny poems and would be the best thing ever.

As I have noted in these rereads, my expectations are frequently wrong.

But that doesn’t mean that I don’t have something to say about it and its sequel Sylvie and Bruno Completed.

[Not, perhaps, a kindly something, but something.]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 3:00pm
Excerpt

Monument 14 Savage Drift Emmy Laybourne

Check out Savage Drift, the conclusion to Emmy Laybourne’s Monument 14 trilogy, available May 20th from Feiwel & Friends!

Dean, Alex, and the other survivors of the Monument 14 have escaped the disaster zone and made it to the safety of a Canadian refugee camp. Some of the kids have been reunited with their families, and everyone is making tentative plans for the future. And then, Niko learns that his lost love, Josie, has survived!

For Josie, separated from the group and presumed dead, life has gone from bad to worse. Trapped in a terrible prison camp with other exposed O’s and traumatized by her experiences, she has given up all hope of rescue. Meanwhile, scared by the government’s unusual interest in her pregnancy, Astrid—along with her two protectors, Dean and Jake—joins Niko on his desperate quest to be reunited with Josie.

[Read an Excerpt]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 2:00pm

Welcome back to The Pop Quiz at the End of the Universe, a recurring series here on Tor.com featuring some of our favorite science fiction and fantasy authors, artists, and others!

Today we’re joined by Alison Littlewood, author of A Cold Season, a story of isolation and loss. Her second novel, Path of Needles, is a dark blend of fairy tales and crime fiction, and her latest, a ghost story called The Unquiet House, is available now from Jo Fletcher Books. Alison’s short stories have been picked for the Best Horror of the Year and Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. Other publication credits include the anthologies Terror Tales of the Cotswolds, Where Are We Going? and Never Again. Alison lives in West Yorkshire, England, with her partner Fergus.

Join us as we cover subjects ranging from survival skills to robot sounds, and more!

[Read More]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 1:30pm

When Daniel Blackland was six, he ingested his first bone fragment, a bit of kraken spine plucked out of the sand during a visit with his demanding, brilliant, and powerful magician father, Sebastian.

When Daniel was twelve, he watched Sebastian die at the hands of the Hierarch of Southern California, devoured for the heightened magic layered deep within his bones.

Now, years later, Daniel is a petty thief with a forged identity. Hiding amid the crowds in Los Angeles—the capital of the Kingdom of Southern California—Daniel is trying to go straight. But his crime-boss uncle has a heist he wants Daniel to perform: break into the Hierarch's storehouse of magical artifacts and retrieve Sebastian's sword, an object of untold power.

This is where we find Daniel in Greg Van Eekhout’s California Bones, out this summer from Tor Books, and we want to send you a galley of the novel right now!

Check below for the rules!

[Read more]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 1:00pm

George RR Martin Song of Ice and Fire A Feast for CrowsWelcome back to A Read of Ice and Fire! Please join me as I read and react, for the very first time, to George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire.

Today’s entry is Part 12 of A Feast for Crows, in which we cover Chapter 16 (“Jaime”) and Chapter 17 (“Cersei”).

Previous entries are located in the Index. The only spoilers in the post itself will be for the actual chapters covered and for the chapters previous to them. As for the comments, please note that the Powers That Be have provided you a lovely spoiler thread here on Tor.com. Any spoileriffic discussion should go there, where I won’t see it. Non-spoiler comments go below, in the comments to the post itself.

And now, the post!

[Next thing you know she’ll be going in against a Sicilian when death is on the line]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 12:50pm

We are sorry to report that William H. Patterson, Jr. has passed. Patterson, a critic and writer with a lifelong dedication to studying the work of Robert Heinlein, published a two-volume biography on the writer. Patterson was chosen by Virginia Heinlein to write the works. The first volume, In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1 (1907-1948): Learning Curve was published in 2011, nominated for Hugo and Locus awards, and praised by Locus’ Gary K. Wolfe as “a truly impressive feat of research.” The second volume, 1948-1988: The Man Who Learned Better is forthcoming in June, 2014.

[Read More]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 12:00pm

Welcome back to The Way of Kings reread on Tor.com. Today I cover Chapter 69, the final chapter in Part Four. Sadeas tells Navani a bunch of lies, gives his evil villain speech to Dalinar, and is rewarded in a somewhat surprising fashion!

My high school chanting of “FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!” leads to nothing, and the symbolism is big and obvious, but in the end what really matters is that Dalinar is a really weird dad to a bunch of people who aren’t actually his children. Why don’t you ever weirdly adopt daughters, Dalinar? Why? ANSWER ME!

[Read more]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 11:00am

In Your Eyes is a new Peter Gabriel jukebox musical magical realist romance which tells the story of star-crossed lovers who share a psychic link and can literally see the world through each others’ eyes, despite having never met. The screenplay was written several years ago by Joss Whedon who, in the wake of his Much Ado About Nothing self-production success, tapped director Brin Hill to bring the film to life under Bellweather, LLC, the new small budget production company run by Whedon and his wife, Kai Cole.

There’s been a lot of excitement about Whedon’s decision to release the film on VOD immediately following its Sunday night premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival — the man knows his niche marketing, and has had similar indie success with Dr. Horrible’s Sing-A-Long Blog and Mucho Ado About Nothing. The end product is an enjoyable film that, while a refreshing change from Whedon’s oeuvre, never quite transcends “generic quirky indie romance.”

[Read More]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 10:00am

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneThe Harry Potter Reread has gorged itself on chocolate frogs, and now can only speak in croaks and ribbits. Which is very rude of it. I suppose it’s up to us to snap it back into shape… I’d do it on my own, but I am gorged on pumpkin pasties. (Really, I’d just very much like to try one. There must be a recipe somewhere…. Bingo.)

There’s a lot to discuss this week, so it’s a single chapter this time! We’re on Chapter 12—The Mirror of Erised. Which means that this chapter is made of emotions, invisibility, and Christmas! Nothing can possibly be bad about that. Right?

Index to the reread can be located here! Other Harry Potter and Potter-related pieces can be found under their appropriate tag. And of course, since we know this is a reread, all posts might contain spoilers for the entire series. If you haven’t read all the Potter books, be warned.

[We know we’re called Gred and Forge.]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 9:00am

Star Wars I Jedi Micheal Stackpole Today, I doubt anybody would let Michael A. Stackpole get away with what he did in 1998. If you were to ask me, right now in 2014, what I thought of a Star Wars novel written in the first person featuring a character who never appears in any of the novels movies, running through a plot which retcons events of beloved novels from a few years before, I’d say there’s zero market for such a book.

I, Jedi is a niche inside of a niche inside of niche, which is actually why it’s wonderful. And though it might not be the best Star Wars book of them all, it is easily the best Star Wars novel.

[Read more]

Thu
Apr 24 2014 8:00am

Behold the first shot from the set of Avengers: Age of Ultron! Mark Ruffalo took this selfie with Robert Downey Jr., and then captioned it “Bros” for maximum movie-scientist-BFF-adorableness. But that’s not all! He also took a shot of Black Widow, that maybe kinda sorta reveals her hairstyle, which led Marvel to beg him to stop. Over Twitter. Because that’s how people have meetings now. And then Ruffalo called himself their “black sheep Avenger,” which led to us deciding to marry him.

Morning Roundup has some news to give you before the wedding! Fabulously weird comic Chew is becoming a TV show! Roberto Orci and Alex Kutrzman are ending their partnership! We have another wonderful piece of news from Avengers: Age of Ultron!

[And speaking of weddings, our favorite couple waits at the bottom of this post!]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 4:00pm

Peacemaker Marianne de PierresVirgin Jackson is a park ranger, but not just for any park. She is responsible for making sure Birrimun Park in Australia remains a crime-free zone. It is, after all, the largest natural landscape in the world of this near future world, so her job is no small thing. When Virgin notices a couple of unsavory individuals in the park—unsavory individuals with guns who have entered the park by no means she can immediately determine—Marianne de Pierres’s Peacemaker kicks into full gear.

Told from Virgin’s point of view, de Pierres’s narrative is very intimate. We see everything through her eyes, including the United States Marshall assigned to shadow her on the strange goings-on at the park, Nate Sixkiller. (Yeah, just go with the name). He comes across as polite and mannered in a classic cowboy sort of fashion, yet quite stoic and unbending.

[Ride along with some Cowboys in Australia…]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 3:00pm

Agents of SHIELD season 1, episode 19: The Only Light in the Darkness

As supervillain powers go, “turning off the lights without having to get out of bed” is dubious. You can jazz it up like this week’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. episode did and claim that what Blackout is really doing is absorbing energy, but that still means your villain’s greatest weakness is A Bunch of Flashlights. Thanks for the takedown, trick-or-treating group of kids! We’ll call you next time he escapes.

If this was earlier on in the season, I feel like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. would have tried to hang its entire episode on this monster chase in an attempt to dazzle the viewer with the concept alone. It’s a sign of the continued growth of the show that “The Only Light in the Darkness” now pushes that to the margins in favor of spending its time with our non-super-powered—but more interesting by the week!—team of agents.

[Read more]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 2:00pm

Sofia Samatar I’ve been more or less obsessed with Sofia Samatar since I first read her debut novel, A Stranger in Olondria (2013). Her work is gorgeous and innovative, breaking new ground while evoking the best of classic SFF. And I’m not the only one to think so; Sofia has recently been nominated for the John W. Campbell Award For Best New Writer.

She was kind enough to answer a few questions about her writing, below.

[Read more...]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 1:00pm

Gojira Godzilla 1954

Right now, and for the rest of the summer, touring in select movie theatres in America is a cinematic 60th Anniversary Restoration of Ishiro Honda’s immortal monster film Gojira, or as we came to know him in the US, Godzilla. And with Bryan Cranston getting ready to do battle with the big G in the newest American reboot of Godzilla, this is the perfect time to revisit the first footprint from “the king of monsters.” And I do mean literally, because even in 1954, that footprint shows up way before the monster does.

[Read more]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 12:30pm

Yesterday Wired published an exhaustive oral history of the Greatest Show of All Time, Mystery Science Theater 3000, and in the last two paragraphs dropped the bombshell that Joel Hodgson is planning to resurrect the show. Already plenty of pop culture sites have weighed in, and obviously the consensus has been YES WE WANT THIS NOW. And there is already a gleeful reddit debate about who could host. And while I am one of those jumping up and down in Muppet-like enthusiasm, the reaction has also made me ask: why? Why are we still debating Joel vs. Mike after all these years? Why is this show the one that continues to speak to us, even to people who were infants when the show started?

Why, in 2014, with so many options, do we keep returning to the Satellite of Love?

[This may just be a show, but I can relax when I’m dead.]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 12:00pm

Welcome to the Malazan Reread of the Fallen! Every post will start off with a summary of events, followed by reaction and commentary by your hosts Bill and Amanda (with Amanda, new to the series, going first), and finally comments from Tor.com readers. In this article, we’ll cover the second half of chapter nineteen of Dust of Dreams.

A fair warning before we get started: We’ll be discussing both novel and whole-series themes, narrative arcs that run across the entire series, and foreshadowing. Note: The summary of events will be free of major spoilers and we’re going to try keeping the reader comments the same. A spoiler thread has been set up for outright Malazan spoiler discussion.

[Read More]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 11:00am

Rocket Talk: Tor.com podcast

In this episode of Rocket Talk, Justin Landon is joined by Joe Monti, Executive Editor for Simon & Schuster’s new SFF imprint, Saga Press. Justin and Joe talk about what direction the press will go, adjusting to life as an editor vs. an agent, why grimdark isn't a movement, and the impact of blogs on book selling.

[Listen]

Wed
Apr 23 2014 10:00am

Grimdark

Now, before we get started, allow me to be clear: grimdark is great! It has its place in the fantasy spectrum, and many works that fall under the grimdark or gritty heading are classics. Obviously, we here at Tor.com love our Abercrombie and Martin—which, really, they need to also be a vaudeville team—but sometimes we want a fantasy that’s more optimistic. Just a little, guys! C’mon, we’re not asking for much...

[Read More]