Sat
May 21 2011 10:00pm

2011 Nebula Award Winners!

Nebula AwardsSince 1965, the Nebula Awards are given each year by the Science Fiction Writers of America for outstanding works of science fiction, fantasy, or related fiction genre. This year’s presentation was held at the Washington Hilton in Washington D.C. Tor.com would like to extend hearty congratulations to all the winners and nominees!

TOASTMASTER: Michael Swanwick

SHORT STORY

NOVELETTE

  • WINNER: “That Leviathan, Whom Thou Hast Made,” Eric James Stone (Analog 9/10)
  • “Map of Seventeen,” Christopher Barzak (The Beastly Bride)
  • “The Jaguar House, in Shadow,” Aliette de Bodard (Asimov’s 7/10)
  • “Plus or Minus,” James Patrick Kelly (Asimov’s 12/10)
  • “Pishaach,” Shweta Narayan (The Beastly Bride)
  • “The Fortuitous Meeting of Gerard van Oost and Oludara,” Christopher Kastensmidt (Realms of Fantasy 4/10)
  • “Stone Wall Truth,” Caroline M. Yoachim (Asimov’s 2/10)

NOVELLA

 NOVEL

BRADBURY AWARD BEST DRAMATIC PRODUCTION 

  • WINNER: Inception, Christopher Nolan (director), Christopher Nolan (screenplay) (Warner)
  • Despicable Me, Pierre Coffin & Chris Renaud (directors), Ken Daurio & Cinco Paul (screenplay), Sergio Pablos (story) (Illumination Entertainment)
  • Doctor Who: “Vincent and the Doctor,” Richard Curtis (writer), Jonny Campbell (director)
  • How to Train Your Dragon, Dean DeBlois & Chris Sanders (directors), William Davies, Dean DeBlois, & Chris Sanders (screenplay) (DreamWorks Animation)
  • Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World, Edgar Wright (director), Michael Bacall & Edgar Wright (screenplay) (Universal)
  • Toy Story 3, Lee Unkrich (director), Michael Arndt (screenplay), John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, & Lee Unkrich (story) (Pixar/Disney)

ANDRE NORTON AWARD

THE SOLSTICE AWARD (for impact on the field)

  • WINNER: Alice Sheldon/James Tiptree, JR.
  • WINNER: Michael Whelan

SERVICE TO SFWA

  • WINNER: John E. Johnston III
24 comments
Kim Richards Gilchrist
1. Kim Richards Gilchrist
Congratulations to all the winners! Thank you to SWFA for bringing them to us.
Marcus W
2. toryx
I'm really happy that Connie Wilson won for Best Novel. Congratulations to her and all the winners!
Brent Longstaff
3. Brentus
Congratulations to the nominees and winners! I'm really happy about Blackout /All Clear, Inception, and I Shall Wear Midnight; I would have picked all of those. I haven't read much in the shorter fiction categories so I can't comment on those.
Nick Rogers
4. BookGoblin
Congratulations to all the winners!

I'm more surprised that "Ponies" won than I was that it was nominated. Not that it doesn't deserve awards, it was a chilling story that left me uncomfortable and a bit shaken, which is a marvelous accomplishment for fiction, but it didn't feel particularly "sci-fi" as I preconcieved my notion of science fiction.

Granted, life sized magical ponies with cotton candy blood are clearly fictional and violate our understanding of science, but it felt more like a horror story than a sci-fi story in my mind. A really REALLY good horror story.

Thankfully, the voters for the Nebula didn't share my limited vision of what sci-fi was, and gave the award to a truly wonderful piece of work.
Joel Cunningham
5. jec81
i am really not pleased with the willis victory, but i am apparently the only one who is mystified by her popularity. i think i'd like her books if they were each 250 pages shorter.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
6. Laura S.
@ jec81 She writes wonderful short stories and novellas as well (Fire Watch, Inside Job, Remake, and Lincoln's Dreams are all great shorter pieces, and Fire Watch is published with a collection of her short stories), so maybe you can test out that theory. :)
Nicholas Whyte
7. Nicholas Whyte
Congratulations to the winners, especially Sir Terry, and Rachel Swirsky who is the first Hugo or Nebula winner to have been born in the 1980s!
Jonathan Crowe
8. mcwetboy
@BookGoblin: “a chilling story that left me uncomfortable and a bit shaken” could be applied to most of the nominees in the Best Short Story category, actually. I’m not even sure “Ponies” was the nastiest story on the list.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
9. louww
Can someone explain to me how Connie Willis won with what was two novels? If Blackout / All-Clear was supposed to be one novel (as it has been treated for the Nebula), why wasn't it published as such? Was the entire manuscript of both books submitted to the publisher at the same time?
Kristen Templet
10. SF_Fangirl
I too am bothered by Willis's win because I hate split books with a firery passion. Props for her for getting them published in a short time frame and insisting that it was single story/book, but she needed to convince her publisher of that first.

This sets a bad precedent for duologies and series for future book awards. "I'm not voting for the last book published last year, I'm voting for the entire series up to now."
Kim Richards Gilchrist
11. Brad V.
Kij Johnson, Eric James Stone, and Rachel Swirsky were good choices. But Harlan Ellison (R), Connie Willis, and Terry Pratchett have garnered enough in the way of honors already. The SFWA needs to spread the love further: more surprises next year, please, and fewer of the usual suspects.
Brent Longstaff
12. Brentus
@ louww - Yes, I believe that the whole thing was a single manuscript but the publisher decided that it should be released in two volumes due to the length. The two volumes are not standalone at all. It's not a series; it's a single two-volume book that is part of a series of 3 books.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
13. N. Mamatas
Brad @11. Terry Pratchett has won almost no major awards:
http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/Db/NomLit105.html#4199

Never a Hugo, this is his first Nebula, and the only World Fantasy was a lifetime achievement last year.

(And no, I don't consider the Locus a major award.)
Kim Richards Gilchrist
14. James Davis Nicoll
If Blackout / All-Clear was supposed to be one novel (as it has been treated for the Nebula), why wasn't it published as such?

One factor could be that bookstores are reluctant to stock SF hardcovers over 120K words (IIRC) except from a small handful of Names like Peter Hamilton and David Weber.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
15. Pamala Knight
Congratulations to all the winners AND the nominees. An awesome lineup of talent to choose from and I don't envy the judges.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
16. JeffR23
N. Mamatas@13:

Pratchett has declined at least one Hugo nomination, though. (Going Postal, 2005)

And even if the Carnagie Medal isn't a major award, surely the O.B.E. is...
Jonathan Crowe
17. mcwetboy
@SF_Fangirl: I’m not sure that the “bad precedent” isn’t already happening now: I rather doubt Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won the Hugo solely on its own merits. Series books win awards all the time. For a split book to win—i.e., a single novel published in two volumes for commercial reasons—both parts would have to have been published in the same period of eligibility. That doesn’t happen often: the only other recent cases I can think of off-hand are Peter Watts’s ßehemoth and Scott Westerfeld’s Risen Empire/Killing of Worlds diptych.
Michael Walsh
18. MichaelWalsh
SF_Fangirl wrote: "This sets a bad precedent for duologies and series for future book awards."

A work published serially has always been eligible, but only oncc and only in the year the last part appeared.

Hugo rules state:
"3.2.6: Works appearing in a series are eligible as individual works, but the series as a whole is not eligible. However, a work appearing in a number of parts shall be eligible for the year of the final part."
http://www.wsfs.org/bm/const-2009.htm
Kim Richards Gilchrist
19. Adam S.
Kij Johnson, Eric James Stone, and Rachel Swirsky were good choices. But Harlan Ellison (R), Connie Willis, and Terry Pratchett have garnered enough in the way of honors already. The SFWA needs to spread the love further: more surprises next year, please, and fewer of the usual suspects.

I'm not sure I understand this view of things... Aren't awards intended to be representative of the best works over the past year (as viewed by the SFWA, of course)? If that's the case, whether or not an author has won numerous awards in the past should be a moot point. "Spreading the love further" can then be reworded as "watering down the field" since those who've previously won major awards cannot be eligible.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
20. gaylesmith5
I am thrilled that Connie Willis won. The books were fantastic.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
21. fringecup
I'm so pleased that Connie Willis won the Nebula Award this year! I had never read anything written by her and tried Blackout because it sounded interesting. Well!! The nights I spent up until 3:00 finding out about the latest antics of Alf and Binnie (two evacuated London children) and the problems dealt with by the various time-travelling students! I thought both books were truly inspired writing - I can hardly wait to read another Connie Willis novel!
Kim Richards Gilchrist
22. Pawyilee
I'm happy “That Leviathan, Whom Thou Hast Made,” won, and hope it is the first part of a trilogy.
Kim Richards Gilchrist
23. StargateJean
fringecup, if you thought Blackout and All Clear were good, you really, really need to read Doomsday Book by Connie Willis. It will blow you away!
Kim Richards Gilchrist
24. Merlin Falcon-Gates
I am dreadfully disappointed that Ted Chiang didn't win for novella. It was by far and away the most interesting treatment of AI's in ages.

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