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Ruthanna Emrys

Fiction and Excerpts [9]
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Fiction and Excerpts [9]

Winter Tide: Chapter 5

, || After attacking Devil’s Reef in 1928, the U.S. government rounded up the people of Innsmouth and took them to the desert, far from their ocean, their Deep One ancestors, and their sleeping god Cthulhu. Only Aphra and Caleb Marsh survived the camps, and they emerged without a past or a future.

Winter Tide: Chapter 4

, || After attacking Devil’s Reef in 1928, the U.S. government rounded up the people of Innsmouth and took them to the desert, far from their ocean, their Deep One ancestors, and their sleeping god Cthulhu. Only Aphra and Caleb Marsh survived the camps, and they emerged without a past or a future.

Step 1, Fake Own Death; Step 3, Profit: H.P. Lovecraft and Duane Rimel’s “The Disinterment”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at H.P. Lovecraft and Duane Rimel’s “The Disinterment,” first published in January 1937 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“Intuitively I knew my own tombstone…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Is It True: Shirley Jackson’s “The Daemon Lover”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Shirley Jackson’s “The Daemon Lover,” first published in her The Lottery: The Adventures of James Harris collection in 1949. Spoilers ahead.

[“Dearest Anne, by the time you get this I will be married…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

I Was Into Sanity-Destroying Texts Before They Were Cool: Robin Laws’s “Full Bleed”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Robin Laws’s “Full Bleed,” first published in his New Tales of the Yellow Sign collection in 2012. Spoilers ahead.

[“…a face that may be a mask, or may be monstrous.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

I Want My Necromancy: H.P. Lovecraft and C.M. Eddy Jr.’s “The Loved Dead”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Lovecraft and C.M. Eddy, Jr.’s “The Loved Dead,” first published in the May-June-July 1924 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“It is midnight. Before dawn they will find me and take me to a black cell…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Don’t Judge a Book By Its Lacy Frock: Kishin Houkou Demonbane

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today, to celebrate our 150th post (and definitely not our 151st), we’re covering Lovecraftian mecha anime Kishin Houkou Demonbane. The Original Video Animation, directed by Shintaro Inokawa, was released from ViewWorks in July 2004. The animated series, written by Yōsuke Kuroda and directed by Hidetoshi Yoshida, aired May-August 2006 on WOWOW. Spoilers ahead.

[“A pure and foul ceremony is about to revive.”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

How to Investigate Cthulhu on Ten Dollars a Day With Your Sanity Intact

This is definitely not the 150th post of the Lovecraft Reread. For post #150, we’re going to be covering Kishin Houkou Demonbane, which we* finally found a malware-free version of in the restricted stacks at Miskatonic. But we haven’t had a chance to watch it yet, so this isn’t post #150, quod erat demonstrandum.

Ruthanna hasn’t had the chance because she vastly overestimated her ability to get work done in Australia, where she was definitely not searching the vast deserts for buried pre-human ruins, and certainly didn’t find anything. And Anne claims to be “overbooked,” which has nothing to do with forbidden tomes of any sort…

[We have excuses…]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Horrible Things Come in Small Packages: H.P. Lovecraft and Hazel Heald’s “Winged Death”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Lovecraft and Hazel Heald’s “Winged Death,” first published in the March 1934 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“The Orange Hotel stands in High Street near the railway station…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

How Not to Handle Rejection Letters: M.R. James’s “Casting the Runes”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at M. R. James’s “Casting the Runes,” first published in 1911 in his More Ghost Stories collection. Spoilers ahead.

[“Dear Sir, I am requested by the Council of the ___ Association to return to you the draft of a paper on The Truth of Alchemy…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Void is a Harsh Critic: John Glasby’s “Drawn From Life”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at John Glasby’s “Drawn From Life,” first published in the Michaelmas 1989 issue of Crypt of Cthulhu. Spoilers ahead.

[“And the music! It rose and fell in wild, tormented shrieks and cadences…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Yo Ho Ho and a Bottle of… Um: Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette’s “Boojum”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Elizabeth Bear and Sarah Monette’s “Boojum,” first published in Ann and Jeff VanderMeer’s Fast Ships, Black Sails anthology in 2008. Spoilers ahead.

[“Black Alice was on duty when the Lavinia Whateley spotted prey…”]

Cthulhu and Sons: Lin Carter’s “The Winfield Heritance”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Lin Carter’s “The Winfield Heritance” (unless it’s “Heritage” or “Inheritance,” sources differ), first published in 1981 in Weird Tales #3 (an anthology, edited by Carter himself, not a magazine). Spoilers ahead.

[“The coiling stone stair did not end, but it vanished into a black pool of slimy liquid mud…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

The Cthulhu Whisperer: Brian Hodge’s “The Same Deep Waters As You”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Brian Hodge’s “The Same Deep Waters As You,” first published in 2013 in Stephen Jones’s Weirder Shadows Over Innsmouth anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“At first it was soothing, a muted drone both airy and deep…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

One-Star Reviews Have Consequences: S.P. Miskowski’s “Strange is the Night”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at S.P. Miskowski’s “Strange is the Night,” first published in 2015 in Joseph S. Pulver’s Cassilda’s Song anthology. Spoilers ahead.

[“A growl of thunder overhead and Pierce imagined the ceiling cracking open…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Glamour Shot With Dog Skull: Caitlín Kiernan’s “Pickman’s Other Model”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Caitlín Kiernan’s “Pickman’s Other Model (1929),” first published in March 2008 in Sirenia Digest. Spoilers ahead.

[“Thurber and I used to argue about the validity of first-person narration as an effective literary device…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread

Bad Solutions For Writer’s Block: Henry Kuttner’s “The Salem Horror”

Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn.

Today we’re looking at Henry Kuttner’s “The Salem Horror,” first published in the May 1937 issue of Weird Tales. Spoilers ahead.

[“He became conscious that he was standing in the exact center of the chamber…”]

Series: The Lovecraft Reread