A Cup of Salt Tears August 27, 2014 A Cup of Salt Tears Isabel Yap They say women in grief are beautiful. Strongest Conjuration August 26, 2014 Strongest Conjuration Skyler White A story of the Incrementalists. Seven Commentaries on an Imperfect Land August 20, 2014 Seven Commentaries on an Imperfect Land Ruthanna Emrys Stories of Tikanu. Hero of the Five Points August 19, 2014 Hero of the Five Points Alan Gratz A League of Seven story.
From The Blog
August 30, 2014
Locked in a Room With His Greatest Enemy. Doctor Who: “Into the Dalek”
Chris Lough
August 25, 2014
Animorphs: Why the Series Rocked and Why You Should Still Care
Sam Riedel
August 20, 2014
The Welcome Return of the Impatient and Cantankerous Doctor Who
David Cranmer
August 19, 2014
The Wheel of Time Reread Redux: Introductory Post
Leigh Butler
August 19, 2014
Whatever Happened to the Boy Wonder? Bring Robin Back to the Big Screen
Emily Asher-Perrin
Tue
Sep 2 2014 9:00am

A More Intimate Scale: Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie

Ancillary Sword Ann Leckie Ann Leckie’s debut novel, Ancillary Justice, has won six awards—latest and not least the Hugo Award for Best Novel—and appeared on the shortlists for at least two more. After such a successful first outing, the major question with Ancillary Sword has to be: how does it compare? Has Leckie caught the same lightning in a bottle twice?

I loved Ancillary Justice. For me, it was one of those books you’ve wanted to read your whole life, an empty gap where you didn’t realise how wide a gap existed for it to bridge until you read it. I had a very strong positive emotional response to Ancillary Justice, is what I’m saying.

Only time will tell whether Ancillary Sword achieves the same success in the wider world, but for me? It already has. It turns out that I love Ancillary Sword just as much as its predecessor, if not more.

[Read More]

Fri
Aug 29 2014 9:00am

Werewolf Mercenaries and Mentors: Shifting Shadows by Patricia Briggs

Patricia Briggs Mercy Thompson Shifting Shadows Patricia Briggs switched to writing urban fantasy after her first eight novels—which took place in various different second-world contexts—and has achieved no small measure of success with them. The Mercy Thompson series—about a coyote shapeshifter car mechanic set in a world where werewolves, vampires, and fae live among humans—has many flaws, but Briggs knows how to tell an entertaining story.

Shifting Shadows is her first short fiction collection, and consists of stories set in the Mercy Thompson continuum.

[A review]

Thu
Aug 28 2014 1:00pm

A Read of Ice and Fire: A Feast for Crows, Part 28

George R R Martin A Song of Ice and Fire A Feast for CrowsWelcome back to A Read of Ice and Fire! Please join me as I read and react, for the very first time, to George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire.

Today’s entry is Part 28 of A Feast for Crows, in which we cover Chapter 39 (“Cersei”).

Previous entries are located in the Index. The only spoilers in the post itself will be for the actual chapters covered and for the chapters previous to them. As for the comments, please note that the Powers That Be have provided you a lovely spoiler thread here on Tor.com. Any spoileriffic discussion should go there, where I won’t see it. Non-spoiler comments go below, in the comments to the post itself.

And now, the post!

[“Leal” in Old French is “loial.” HAHAHAHAHAHA]

Thu
Aug 28 2014 9:00am

Tasty, Tasty Angst: Sarah J. Maas’s Heir of Fire

Throne of Glass Heir of Fire Sarah J Maas review I have a confession to make. A guilty secret, if you like: Sarah J. Maas’s first two novels, Throne of Glass and Crown of Midnight, are the kind of books I love to hate. Implausible, inconsistent in characterisation, populated by protagonists who are all in their own way some variety of Mary Sue, operating according to Opposite World logic, and with the kind of scattershot worldbuilding and wrongness-in-small-details that makes me bang my head against walls, they nonetheless possess an indefinable quality that keeps me reading all the way to the end. I think it may be the tasty tasty angst.

Heir of Fire is the third volume in Maas’s ongoing series about youthful assassin Celaena Sardothien. It marks the first occasion where I feel that Maas may one day mature into a writer whose work I enjoy in its own right, and not mainly for the pleasure I find in taking it apart.

[Read More]

Wed
Aug 27 2014 3:00pm

Lois Lane Gets Her Own YA Novel With Virtual Reality Video Games and Internet Romance

Lois Lane young adult YA novel Fallout virtual reality video games cyberbullying Instant Messenger Clark Kent Superman DC Comics

When DC Comics publisher Dan DiDio hinted last year that “we have big plans for Lois Lane in 2014,” we assumed that meant her own comic, in time for Superman’s 75th anniversary. Instead, Lois’ first real solo project will be a young adult novel called Fallout, by Gwenda Bond.

Much like Dean Trippe’s excellent (and, sadly, rejected) Lois Lane: Girl Reporter pitch, Fallout aims to introduce Lois to an entirely new generation of comics fans and reporter wannabes. And they’re doing so in the most Millennial way possible.

[Read more]

Tue
Aug 26 2014 5:35pm

John Scalzi and Apple Answer All the Things! (About Lock In)

John Scalzi Twitter Apple Chat Lock In

John Scalzi took to Twitter in conjunction with Apple iBooks for a chat during Tuesday afternoon, answering questions about his new novel, Lock In under the hashtag #AskScalzi. Apple started things off, asking questions about Scalzi’s blog, the ideas behind Lock In, and the possibilities of a follow up! Then they turned things over to the fans, who asked about everything from Old Man’s War to Redshirts. Check out the recap below, and head over to iBooks to order your copy of Lock In.

[Snark as far as the eye can see...]

Tue
Aug 26 2014 1:00pm

The Wheel of Time Reread Redux: From the Two Rivers Prologue

From the Two Rivers Eye of the World Wheel of Time reread Robert JordanGreetings, my peoples! Welcome to the first official post of the Wheel of Time Reread Redux! Today’s Redux post will cover “Ravens,” the prologue of From the Two Rivers: Part One of the Eye of the World.

All original posts are listed in The Wheel of Time Reread Index here, and all Redux posts will also be archived there as well. (The Wheel of Time Master Index, as always, is here, which has links to news, reviews, interviews, and all manner of information about the Wheel of Time in general on Tor.com.)

The Wheel of Time reread is also now available as an ebook series, except for the portion covering A Memory of Light, which should become available soon.

All Reread Redux posts will contain massive spoilers for the entire Wheel of Time series, so if you haven’t read, read at your own risk.

And now, the post!

[“Don’t regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.”]

Tue
Aug 26 2014 11:00am

Sleeps With Monsters: Some Books and a Night of Awards

Fairs' Point Queen of the Tearling Hardship

Fairs’ Point by Melissa Scott (Lethe Press, 2014) is the long-awaited novel-length continuation of the novels of Astreiant. The first two Astreiant books, Point of Hopes and Point of Dreams, were co-written by Scott and her late partner, Lisa A. Barnett, over a decade ago. In 2012, Scott released a novella, Point of Knives, whose events take place between the original two novels, but this is the first true sequel.

And damn, is it an excellent book. The city of Astreiant is a vivid and compelling setting, in all its early-modern-approximate glory—it feels like a real and complex city, with a real city’s currents swirling through its streets. The magic of Astreiant’s world is the magic of Hermetic science, reliant on astrology—but astrology is a key part of everyone’s lives, and everyone consults horoscopes: I love it.

[Read More]

Mon
Aug 25 2014 2:00pm

“Brave People are Afraid. I’m Not Afraid Anymore.” Kameron Hurley’s The Mirror Empire

The Mirror Empire Kameron Hurley review Kameron Hurley’s nonfiction writing recently won awards in two separate categories at this year’s Hugo ceremony (Best Fan Writer and Best Related Work, to be exact). Her first science fiction novel, God’s War, was shortlisted for, among others, the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the BSFA Award. The Bel Dame Apocrypha trilogy (God’s War, Infidel, and Rapture) heralded the arrival of new, uncompromising voice in the SFF field. Hurley’s first outings proved her ability to innovate: to mix really weird elements of worldbuilding with visceral brutality and strong characterisation, in stories that have interesting arguments about social change, war, and survival at their core.

Stories with a deeply, angrily, feminist vein.

The Mirror Empire takes what Hurley’s already shown us she’s capable of with regard to science fiction, and applies it to the vast canvas of epic fantasy. This isn’t the epic fantasy we’re all used to, though, recognisably inspired by cultures from our own history—and that mostly northern European ones. No: this is epic fantasy that builds its world from the ground up, and that world is deeply, fascinatingly weird.

[Filled with bad shit on its way...]

Thu
Aug 21 2014 2:30pm

Who Wants to Play Two Truths and A Lie with John Scalzi?

John Scalzi is celebrating the release of Lock In with a rousing game of Two Truths and a Lie! The game is simple: Scalzi tells three stories, and you guess which are the truths and which one is the big fat fib. Google Play is hosting the game, and that’s not all: they’re also offering e-books of the whole Scalzi backlist for 50% off!

Check out the video below, and then head over to Google Play to guess play along and and pick up Lock In or one of Scalzi’s other fine titles!

[Click through for LIES.]

Thu
Aug 21 2014 1:00pm

A Read of Ice and Fire: A Feast for Crows, Part 27

Song of Ice and Fire A Feast For CrowsWelcome back to A Read of Ice and Fire! Please join me as I read and react, for the very first time, to George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire.

Today’s entry is Part 27 of A Feast for Crows, in which we cover Chapter 37 (“Brienne”) and Chapter 38 (“Jaime”).

Previous entries are located in the Index. The only spoilers in the post itself will be for the actual chapters covered and for the chapters previous to them. As for the comments, please note that the Powers That Be have provided you a lovely spoiler thread here on Tor.com. Any spoileriffic discussion should go there, where I won’t see it. Non-spoiler comments go below, in the comments to the post itself.

And now, the post!

[“Best thing for him, really. His therapy was going nowhere.”]

Tue
Aug 19 2014 1:00pm

The Wheel of Time Reread Redux: Introductory Post

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the inaugural post of the Wheel of Time Reread Redux!

I know, right, some of y’all are probably all what the hell is this, Leigh, but fear not, O my Peeps, for I shall explain all in this handy-dandy introductory post right heah. Because I love you, even if I have not met you.

Therefore, click on to see what this crazy adventure is all about!

[Squirrel!]

Mon
Aug 18 2014 12:50pm

Syfy’s Childhood’s End Adaptation is Moving Forward Once More

Syfy adaptation Childhood's End Arthur C. Clarke Akiva Goldsman Michael De Luca Nick Hurran Matthew Graham Doctor Who writer director producers

Syfy has been teasing an adaptation of Arthur C. Clarke’s sci-fi classic Childhood’s End since 2013, but the project stalled when the network made some programming changes. But according to Deadline, Syfy is gearing back up on what will be a six-hour miniseries.

Producer Michael De Luca (The Social Network) is joined by Akiva Goldsman, who worked on I Am Legend and (the Keanu Reeves) Constantine, as well as contributed to the screenplay for I, Robot. Syfy has also roped in two Doctor Who alums to write and direct—respectively, Matthew Graham (“Fear Her”) and Nick Hurran (“The Angels Take Manhattan” and “The Day of the Doctor,” among other episodes).

Published in 1953, Childhood’s End tells how the peaceful alien Overlords took over Earth to erase war and create a near-utopia... but at global personal cost. Though several adaptations have been attempted, none have yet come to the big screen. Stanley Kubrick was at one point interested, but he and Clarke ended up collaborating on what would become 2001: A Space Odyssey. We’ve got our fingers crossed that Syfy finally gives Childhood’s End the greenlight.

Fri
Aug 15 2014 1:05pm

“Perhaps It Was Only an Echo”: The Giver

The Giver movie review Lois Lowry Jeff Bridges Brenton Thwaites Katie Holmes Meryl Streep Odeya Rush dystopia classic book vs movie

I liked the movie adaptation of Lois Lowry’s The Giver, but I didn’t love it. (Precision of language!) I was curious to see the depictions of the utopian Community, built on the safe and conflict-free notion of “sameness.” Jeff Bridges embodied the character of the Giver in a way familiar and comforting to those who grew up reading the book. Watching Jonas discover colors for the first time is a strangely emotional experience. But ultimately, the movie did not stir in me the same depth of feeling as reading that classic for the first time.

Now, let’s drop the Community syntax and actually talk about what did and didn’t work in this adaptation of the young adult classic.

[Read more]

Fri
Aug 15 2014 12:30pm

Highlights from Delia’s Shadow Author Jaime Lee Moyer’s AMA!

Jamie Lee Moyer books Delia's Shadow A Barricade in Hell

Author Jaime Lee Moyer recently travelled the lands of reddit to hold an AMA! Her novels are about magic and murder, friendship, betrayal and kissing, and ghosts. Lots of ghosts. She grew up in San Francisco, where her ‘Gabe and Delia’ series is set, but now lives in Texas, where she maintains a “secret identity of Responsible Adult(tm).” Her first novel, the Columbus Literary Award-winning Delia’s Shadow, and its sequel, A Barricade in Hell, are available from Tor Books. The third book in the series, Against a Brightening Sky, will be released in 2015.

Moyer’s first story, written when she was eleven, caused controversy when her best friend’s mother “read it, frowned, and said, ‘This isn’t appropriate subject matter for a girl your age to write about.’ And with that, she walked away with my story in hand. She kept it! I never did get that story back. That was my very first rejection, and the moment I knew I was born to be a writer. I’ve been writing ever since.”

Check out more highlights from Moyer’s AMA below, including the reveal of what made that childhood story so scandalous!

[read more]

Thu
Aug 14 2014 1:00pm

A Read of Ice and Fire: A Feast for Crows, Part 26

George RR Martin Song of Ice and Fire A Feast For CrowsWelcome back to A Read of Ice and Fire! Please join me as I read and react, for the very first time, to George R.R. Martin’s epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire.

Today’s entry is Part 26 of A Feast for Crows, in which we cover Chapter 36 (“Cersei”).

Previous entries are located in the Index. The only spoilers in the post itself will be for the actual chapters covered and for the chapters previous to them. As for the comments, please note that the Powers That Be have provided you a lovely spoiler thread here on Tor.com. Any spoileriffic discussion should go there, where I won’t see it. Non-spoiler comments go below, in the comments to the post itself.

And now, the post!

[“Get up in the morning, death, death, death, death, death, death, death, lunch, death, death, death, afternoon tea, death, death, death, quick shower…"]

Thu
Aug 14 2014 10:50am

Ice-T’s Dungeons & Dragons Audiobook is Out, and it’s Free!

Ice T Dungeons and Dragons audiobook

Remember when we told you that Ice-T narrated a Dungeons & Dragons story, despite the fact that he had no idea what it was about? Well, it’s out now, it’s about Drizzt Do’Urden, and it’s free! To help celebrate the 40th year of Dungeons & Dragons, Audible is releasing The Legend of Drizzt: The Collected Stories for free, but only for a limited time.

The anthology’s stories are written by R.A. Salvatore, and the audiobook includes narration from an insane roster of celebs, including Felicia Day, Dan Harmon, Greg Grunberg, Tom Felton, Danny Pudi, Sean Astin, Melissa Rauch, Wil Wheaton, Al Yankovic, Michael Chiklis, and David Duchovny. Sam Gamgee, Wesley Crusher, and Abed Nadir will read D&D stories to you! About Drizzt!

(Thanks to Tor.com user montsamu for letting us know about this amazing news!)

Wed
Aug 13 2014 3:11pm

Check Out the New Fantasy Series from Naomi Novik, Author of the Temeraire Series!

Uprooted Cover

Naomi Novik, author of the Temeraire novels, is taking us to a new world with Uprooted! The story is a dark fairy tale, where a grim wizard defends villagers from the horrors of an enchanted Wood. In return? He demands ten years of service from a young girl of his choosing. Now the choosing is approaching, and a young woman named Agnieszka fears that her best friend, the lovely Kasia, will be taken. But what if the wizard makes a different choice?

Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.

Uprooted is the start of a new series from author Naomi Novik, look for it next June from Del Rey! You can find more info at the link below.

[via SF Signal]

Tue
Aug 12 2014 3:50pm

Lev Grossman, Rainbow Rowell, and Other YA Authors Sort Their Characters Into Hogwarts Houses

YA authors sort their characters into Hogwarts houses photos Lev Grossman The Magician's Land

At this year’s LeakyCon, BuzzFeed asked young adult authors to play Sorting Hat and decide which Hogwarts house their most popular characters should go into. We’re big fans of sorting fictional characters, so of course we wanted to see where Quentin Coldwater, Hazel Lancaster, Tally Youngblood, and others ended up!

Also, they had to draw their characters, which was amusing in and of itself. (There was more than one excuse of “I’m an author, not an artist!”)

[“Hmm, difficult. VERY difficult...”]

Mon
Aug 11 2014 2:15pm

Is Gillian Anderson’s Debut Sci-Fi Novel Basically Scully X-Files Fic?

Gillian Anderson debut sci-fi novel A Vision of Fire The EarthEnd Saga Dana Scully oh my God mystical nuclear war

Back in January, we discovered that Gillian Anderson was writing a science fiction novel called A Vision of Fire, which will be published in October. Now, we know more about what protagonist Caitlin O’Hara—who we’re envisioning as Dana Scully, only better with kids—is actually in for in the first book of “The EarthEnd Saga.”

Jezebel noticed the official summary, which describes O’Hara as a child psychologist who’s also a single mom with a lackluster dating life (so, no pseudo-Mulder for her?) who has to unlock the secrets of several mystical phenomena in order to avert nuclear war. Wait, what?

[Read more]