A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade July 30, 2014 A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade John Chu Fighting Turbulence requires sacrifices. The Colonel July 29, 2014 The Colonel Peter Watts The hives are sleeping giants. <em>To Eternity</em> July 24, 2014 To Eternity Wesley Allsbrook and Barrie Potter If all things were normal, Stuart would be considered quite a catch. Brisk Money July 23, 2014 Brisk Money Adam Christopher It's hard out there for a robotic detective.
From The Blog
July 30, 2014
Pull List: Kelly Sue DeConnick’s Captain Marvel
Alex Brown
July 30, 2014
Concerning Hobbits, On-Screen and Off: Why Jackson and Tolkien Can Peacefully Co-exist
Jeff LaSala
July 30, 2014
Yes, Women Want to Be Thor—So Why is the New Avengers Line-up Cause For Ire?
Emily Asher-Perrin
July 29, 2014
Introduction to the H. P. Lovecraft Reread
Ruthanna Emrys and Anne M. Pillsworth
July 25, 2014
Huge New Cast and Bloopers. Highlights from the San Diego Comic Con Game of Thrones Panel
Chris Lough
Showing posts tagged: YA click to see more stuff tagged with YA
Mon
Jul 28 2014 4:00pm

The YA Roundup: Our Mockingjay Lives!

Mockingjay Part 1 teaser trailer YA Roundup

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week covers the new Mockingjay Part 1 teaser, the hilarious Divergent Honest Movie Trailer, the first If I Stay clip, and classic books that teens hate. 

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Mon
Jul 28 2014 3:00pm

A Tale as Old as Time: The Seventh Miss Hatfield by Anna Caltabiano

Anna Caltabiano The Seventh Miss Hatfeild review

The Seventh Miss Hatfield is seventeen year old Anna Caltabiano’s second novel: a scientific romance, after a fashion, and indeed, an extraordinary feat for someone so young. I can’t in good conscience recommend it, however—much as I might like to champion the work of such a promising new author.

It’s 1954, and Cynthia, a lonely little girl on the edge of adolescence, has become fascinated by her new neighbour: a strange lady who has spoken to no one in the weeks since she moved into the street. The better to get a glimpse of this antisocial character, Cynthia puts away her doll one day to take Miss Hatfield a package the postman abandoned when she refused to open her door. To her surprise and delight, she’s invited in for a glass of freshly made lemonade. Her host, however, slips some mysterious liquid into her drink: a drop of water from a lake discovered in the distant past by Ponce de Leon which immediately makes her immortal.

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Fri
Jul 25 2014 2:00pm
Excerpt

The Island of Excess Love (Excerpt)

Francesca Lia Block

The Island of Excess Love Francesca Lia Block excerpt Pen has lost her parents. She’s lost her eye. But she has fought Kronen; she has won back her fragile friends and her beloved brother. Now Pen, Hex, Ash, Ez, and Venice are living in the pink house by the sea, getting by on hard work, companionship, and dreams. Until the day a foreboding ship appears in the harbor across from their home. As soon as the ship arrives, they all start having strange visions of destruction and violence. Trance-like, they head for the ship and their new battles begin.

Francesca Lia Block’s The Island of Excess Love is available August 26th from Henry Holt & Co. This companion to Love in the Time of Global Warming follows Pen as she searches for love among the ruins, this time using Virgil’s epic Aeneid as her guide.

[Read an Excerpt]

Mon
Jul 21 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: Goosebumps to Scare Again

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week covers the YA musical being penned by David Leviathan, a preview of Jack Black as R.L. Stine in Goosebumps, Stuff YA Readers Say, and more!

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Thu
Jul 17 2014 5:00pm

Shifting from Human to Supernatural Evil: Messenger

Messenger Lois LowryLois Lowry’s Messenger takes place a few years after the events of The Giver and Gathering Blue. Jonas has settled down in the seemingly genuine utopian village where Kira’s blind father, Christopher, found refuge. Jonas has become the village Leader, with the simple and descriptive name of Leader, and Christopher has become the village Seer, with, ditto. Matty is still Matty, if a little cleaner and more educated, now hoping to earn the name of Messenger. We also get a hint that just maybe the community of The Giver has been forced to change, just a little, by Jonas’ departure, and that they are willing to forgive and forget.

(That’s Jonas’ interpretation. My interpretation is that the community is still so against change that they are doing everything they can do to ensure that no one in the community knows that alternatives exist—even though alternatives are clearly around.)

[When human evil is overtaken by supernatural evil.]

Wed
Jul 16 2014 7:30am

And Finally, For Now, the Fall of the Novel

Young Adult Literature Convention

Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.

In this, the last edition of the British Genre Fiction Focus before the column goes on hiatus over the holidays—more on which in a moment—we’ve got some pretty Patrick Rothfuss cover art, a round-up of some of the conversations to come from the UK’s first Young Adult Literature Convention, and an argument that the modern novel may be “losing the narrative arms race.”

All that, plus the Waterstones Children’s Laureate comes over all Klingon, author Allan Ahlberg takes a stand against Amazon, the first male Queen of Teen is crowned, and more.

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Mon
Jul 14 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: New YA Adaptations on the Horizon!

Welcome to the YA Roundup, the best source of movie news, bookish gossip, new releases and cover reveals from the YA genre!

In this week’s edition: Maximum Ride is being adapted as a YouTube mini series, another Mockingjay short launches on CapitolTV, JK Rowling brings the crew of Harry Potter back together for a short story, and James Dawson wins Queen of Teen!

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Mon
Jul 14 2014 10:00am

Grimdark for Young Adults: Half a King by Joe Abercrombie

Joe Abercrombie Half a King reviewJoe Abercrombie is two writers. He is the writer everyone ascribes him to be and the writer he actually is. The former is Lord Grimdark, a moniker even the man himself has adopted, in which he is accused of, or praised for, writing the most despicable characters and situations. The latter is one of the most thoughtful writers of fantasy fiction, who undermines tropes, points out their absurdity, and makes us feel good about loving them still.

I have always believed in him to be the second of the two.

[Half a review? No! Click through!]

Wed
Jul 9 2014 5:20pm

“I Volunteer as Tribute!”: Stuff YA Readers Say

Stuff YA Readers Say

Remember the “Shit [People] Say” viral video phenomenon of 2011? The original “Shit Girls Say” spawned “Shit Yogis Say,” “Shit Hipsters Say,” “Shit New Yorkers Say,” and basically a tongue-in-cheek, in-the-know video for every niche group.

Except for bookworms! Thankfully, Scholastic’s YA-championing online community This Is Teen has resurrected the meme with their new video, “Stuff YA Readers Say.” And they’ve got our number.

[Give it a look]

Tue
Jul 8 2014 12:30pm

Sometimes Love Just Isn’t Enough: Rainbow Rowell’s Landline

Rainbow Rowell Landline reviewGeorgie McCool is at the peak of her TV writing career with the news of the one show she and her best friend, Seth, had been dreaming about since they first started working together right out of college. It’s everything she’s ever wanted. The only problem is, she’d have to skip the family Christmas vacation to Omaha that’s been planned weeks in advanced. Neal, being the kind and loving husband that he is, doesn’t push her, but is visibly upset that Georgie considers staying behind in California, spending Christmas away from him and their girls. But what can she do? It really is the big break she’s been waiting for, the chance of a lifetime. But is it worth it?

While separated from her husband and children, Georgie contemplates her marriage and how she and Neal went from deeply in love to a shockingly tense relationship. Through the help of a “magical fucking phone”—as Georgie calls it—she’s able to communicate with Neal from the past before they were even engaged. I was fascinated by this premise and was anxious to get my hands on a phone like that. Alas, Target does not sell it.

[Read More]

Wed
Jul 2 2014 2:00pm

Children’s Crusade: The Garden of Darkness by Gillian Murray Kendall

The Garden of Darkness Gillian Murray Kendall

A teenage take on The Walking Dead blissfully free from that franchise’s most mercenary elements, The Garden of Darkness is an astonishingly good debut about a cheerleader and a chess club member’s struggle to survive absent adults in a landscape ravaged by the Pest pandemic.

Though they went to school together way back when, the odd couple we quickly come to care about only really meet a matter of months after Pest lays waste to the world as we know it, killing all the afflicted adults and sentencing every single survivor to death at the onset of adolescence.

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Wed
Jul 2 2014 1:00pm

Lyrical Empowerment: Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta

Memory of Water review Emmi Itaranta

I tried to describe Memory of Water to a few people in the days after I finished it. It was a bit of challenge that led to me falling back on tiresome comparisons. One example read, ‘it feels like the young adult novel I wanted Paolo Baciagalupi’s Shipbreaker to be.’ Or, ‘it’s like Rob Ziegler’s Seed if he cared a lot less about explody things.’ Or worst of all, ‘Emmi Itäranta creates a cocktail of The Hunger Games and The Windup Girl, with Susan Collins’ sense of character and Paolo Baciagalupi’s haunting image of our future.’ Bad, right?

Itäranta’s novel laughs at all these comparisons. Written simultaneously in both English and Finnish, Memory of Water is a lyrical and emotionally scarring novel of life in the indeterminate post-climate change future. Once a plentiful resource, water has become as tightly controlled by the government as nuclear material in the modern world. Wars are waged over it. In northern Europe, seventeen-year-old Noria Kaitio is learning to become a tea master like her father. It’s a position of great responsibility in their culture, one that affords them more water than anyone not affiliated with the government.

[Read more]

Mon
Jun 30 2014 3:40pm

The YA Roundup: With News from the Capitol!

Mockingjay Hunger Games YA Roundup

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

The week features a PSA straight from the Capitol, movie adaptation news for John Green and The Jungle Book, Stephen Colbert on YA, Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize long list announced, death by cover reveals and more!

[Read More]

Wed
Jun 25 2014 7:30am

Strange Chemistry Closes

Strange Chemistry

Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.

I got a dash distracted by the publication of the programme for the Edinburgh International Book Festival last time we did this, so we’ve got a couple of things to catch up on in this edition, including the announcement of an awesome new annual anthology and a striking-sounding space opera, news of the continuing dominance of Claire North and Jasper Fforde’s next novel, and any number of other items.

But the big news in the British genre fiction industry this week was bad. And sad. Angry Robot’s YA fiction imprint has closed its doors, folks.

[Read More]

Mon
Jun 23 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: JK Rowling Trolls Draco Supporters

YA Roundup Draco Malfoy

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week covers the end of Strange Chemistry, a particularly epic Harry Potter rap, JK trolling her Malfoy-loving fanbase, and more.

[Read More]

Mon
Jun 16 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: The Fault In Our Stars Edition

YA Roundup the Fault in Our Stars

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week is our special John Green Edition, included despite being NOT scifi or fantasy but here to serve our YA readers regardless. It also means we’ll abuse the word “okay” at every given opportunity, okay? Okay.

[Read More]

Fri
Jun 13 2014 2:00pm

Hit the Sand Running: Saltwater Vampires by Kirsty Eagar

Saltwater Vampires Kirsty Eagar reviewSo it’s summer (at least here in the northern hemisphere), which means the days are longer, the nights warmer, and readers are busting out their beach reads. So what do I cozy up with as my first pick of the summer? Saltwater Vampires by Aussie YA author, Kirsty Eagar.

If you didn’t find the ocean a tad bit creepy before (and you should, just think of how many people have died in there), you certainly will now. Sign on here for bloodsuckers, revisionist history, secret societies, and of course—some killer waves.

[Some are born immortal, some achieve immortality, and some have immortality thrust upon them.]

Mon
Jun 9 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: The YA Shame

The Hunger Games Katniss salute

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week covers Richard Dawkins’ fairy tales, Thailand protestors inspired by The Hunger Games, some literary snob-trolling, and a new trailer for The Giver!

[Read More]

Wed
May 21 2014 4:00pm

Cryogenic Colonialism: Karen Healey’s While We Run

While We Run Karen Healey review The more I read of Karen Healey’s work, the more impressed I become. While We Run is only her fourth novel, a sequel to last year’s truly excellent When We Wake. Set in Australia a little over a hundred years from now in a time of grave resource depletion, when the human species may well be facing extinction from the changed climate within two generations, When We Wake was the story of Tegan Oglietti, cryogenically frozen in 2027 and brought back to life by the Australian government—the first ever successful revival—who stumbles across a horrifying government conspiracy to do with cryonics and resolves to reveal it to the public.

While We Run is the story of Abdi Taalib, the son of a Djibouti politician. Abdi came to Australia to study, and ended up Tegan’s boyfriend, playing a vital part in Tegan’s spilling of the secrets behind the government’s cryonics conspiracy. It’s not possible to talk about the events of While We Run without mentioning many of the things revealed in When We Wake, so if you haven’t read the first book (and if so, why haven’t you? I recommend you go read it right now), be warned: there are spoilers ahead.

[Spoilers for things that happen in While We Run, too]

Mon
May 19 2014 5:00pm

The YA Roundup: Escape From Gringott’s Turns Into “Harry Potter’s Back: The Ride!”

Welcome to the YA Roundup, the best source of movie news, bookish gossip, new releases and cover reveals from the YA genre!

This week covers news of the Harry Potter movie cast reprising their roles, Octavia Spencer joining Insurgent, and Julianne Moore on her role as rebellion President Coin in the upcoming Mockingjay films.

[Read more]