Cold Wind April 16, 2014 Cold Wind Nicola Griffith Old ways can outlast their usefulness. What Mario Scietto Says April 15, 2014 What Mario Scietto Says Emmy Laybourne An original Monument 14 story. Something Going Around April 9, 2014 Something Going Around Harry Turtledove A tale of love and parasites. The Devil in America April 2, 2014 The Devil in America Kai Ashante Wilson The gold in her pockets is burning a hole.
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Showing posts tagged: YA click to see more stuff tagged with YA
Tue
Apr 15 2014 12:15pm

William Campbell Powell Cory Doctorow Expiration Day

William Campbell Powell’s book Expiration Day takes place in a not-too-distant future where a decline in global fertility has resulted in a decidedly commercial response: Start making sophisticated androids for those who want children.

Powell’s story zeroes in on the formative teenage years of Tania Deeley and her experience as she realizes that the friends and school she has always accepted as rote may in fact consist predominantly of androids. Including her best friend Siân.

But how does a teenager not realize their friends are androids? Little Brother and Homeland author Cory Doctorow was curious about this himself, and after reading an early copy of Powell’s book, sat down with the author to discuss how easy it is to cocoon yourself unquestioningly inside the information you are given, and how hard it is to bust out of that.

[Watch the video of Doctorow and Powell’s discussion]

Mon
Apr 14 2014 1:30pm

Welcome to the YA Roundup, the best source of movie news, bookish gossip, new releases and cover reveals from the YA genre!

In this week’s edition: Archie finally kicks the bucket in his Life With Archie comic series, The Queen of Teen nominations are now open, The Giver featurette responds to fans’ concerns, and we remember a great YA author.

[Read More]

Fri
Apr 11 2014 4:30pm

Plus One by Elizabeth FamaSome of you may remember that Fama’s much praised and beloved Monstrous Beauty and I did not get along. At all. For me, that book was like a train wreck, I finished it because I just couldn’t look away from the mess.

But (yes, there is a but!), I have to hand huge props to Elizabeth Fama who reached out to me after I posted one of my nastier reviews, and never once told me I was wrong in my opinion. She only wanted to discuss where she was coming from in the book, and did so in such a resoundingly positive way that I became a massive fan of the author, even if I really disliked Monstrous Beauty itself (I’ll take a sec here to remind you that many many people did love Monstrous Beauty, so don’t let my experience hold you back if you’re thinking of going there).

At any rate, Fama’s awesome attitude convinced me to give her another go, so when Plus One rolled around I (somewhat shakily) raised my hand to volunteer.

[Will there be blood? ]

Wed
Apr 9 2014 2:00pm

Dreams of Gods and Monsters Laini Taylor Daughter of Smoke and Bone The third and final installment in Laini Taylor’s critically acclaimed Daughter of Smoke and Bone series is out, and it is stunning. I didn’t really expect anything else from Taylor.

An angel and a demon fell in love. It ended badly. That’s the tagline for the series, and it’s true to how the series plays out. Karou is a free and artistic spirit with an unusual homelife. She collects teeth for a demon, Chimera, who grants wishes. Then she meets an angel, Akiva, and her real past starts to unravel just as the war between the Chimera and the Angels hits a critical turning point.

[Read More]

Mon
Apr 7 2014 5:00pm

Welcome to the YA Roundup, giving you the inside scoop on bookish news, book deals, new releases and cover reveals for the YA genre!

This week covers the banning of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, the upcoming film adaptation of Eleanor and Park, and the recipients of some literary prizes for children’s and YA fiction.

[Read More]

Mon
Apr 7 2014 12:30pm

Brandon Sanderson Mistborn Cover ArtBrandon Sanderson’s wildly popular Mistborn trilogy is being reissued for the Young Adult market, and to celebrate the occasion artist Sam Weber has created three all-new covers.

Check out his vision of Vin, the reluctant protagonist of the fantasy trilogy, in the new covers for Mistborn, The Well of Ascension, and The Hero of Ages. Weber captures the sense of motion that permeates these high-flying adventures, and brings Vin to life again.

[Read more]

Mon
Apr 7 2014 9:00am

The Eye of Zoltar review Last Dragonslayer Jasper Fforde

Over the years, the Troll Wars have taken a terrible toll on the Kingdoms of Britain. All but a few of these fights have been finished in a matter of minutes—trolls, it transpires, are hardy targets—nevertheless countless lives have been lost to this pointless conflict... leading, among other things, to an overabundance of orphans. And what are orphans for if not enslaving, eh?

Jennifer Strange, the narrator of Jasper Fforde’s fun-filled fantasy fable, was one of the lucky ones.

[Read More]

Fri
Apr 4 2014 1:00pm

Ava Lavender’s family has a history of tragic love stories. Her great-grandmother, Maman; grandmother, Emilienne; and mother, Viviane’s stories are all told through this generational saga exploring themes of love and love lost.

And then there is Ava, the girl born with wings, where the story truly takes shape. The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender is magical realism at its best.

[Read More]

Mon
Mar 31 2014 5:00pm

Welcome to the YA Roundup, the best source of movie news, bookish gossip, new releases and cover reveals from the YA genre.

This week is all about book-to-film adaptations: If I Stay, Paper Towns, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find them, Petals on the Wind, and sadly, no more Percy Jackson films. We won’t judge you if you cry. Also, Divergent is kicking ass in book sales. Hazzah!

[Read More]

Wed
Mar 26 2014 7:30am

Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.

This week in the business, the Tolkien estate has reached a deal with HarperCollins to publish the grandfather of fantasy’s take on Beowulf, whilst Hodder & Stoughton has set about rescuing Quercus. What does it cost to buy a publisher this close to going under, one wonders?

Later on, Abercrombie readers rejoice, for Half a King is nearly here! And even without the fancy foils and finishes the author promises, the recently released cover art looks lovely.

[Read More]

Thu
Mar 20 2014 5:00pm

Black Dog Rachel Neumeier

If ever you’re looking to blur the lines between adult and young adult fantasy, look no further than the enigmatic Rachel Neumeier. With a volume of work that can never quite be pinned down neatly into one category and with stories more complex than could be conveyed in any blurb, Neumeier strikes a unique balance between the worlds of children and adults.

Her work is, quite frankly, magical.

[Read More]

Wed
Mar 19 2014 7:30am

Folio Prize

Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.

I was AFK last week, celebrating my thirtieth birthday, so there’s lots to talk about today, beginning with the question alluded to in the header: is British writing in decline? Say it ain’t so! Alas, a leading academic believes exactly that.

Later on, join me in riding the Red Eye by way of a new fiction list which promises to satisfy the same itch Point Horror did, then in Cover Art Corner, a look at Smiler’s Fair—the first secondary-world epic fantasy Hodder has ever published—and our first peek at Charlaine Harris’ new series.

[Read More]

Wed
Mar 12 2014 10:00am

Half Bad Sally Green Sally Green’s Half Bad is the perfect novel for inspiring one to despise all of humanity or fall onto the ground and weep pathetically. Needless to say, it is an excellent book.

In a world of covert witches, there are the white witches and the black witches. Then there’s Nathan, half white and half black, struggling to figure out whether he’s good, bad or somewhere in between under the increasingly observant White council scrutiny. As Nathan grows, he starts to learn that maybe the world is a little less white and black than the council would like everyone to believe.

Nathan, the protagonist and narrator, has a deadpan, muted voice. It is almost entirely void of drama and emotion as he states events bluntly and without ceremony as if they can’t truly touch him. This works perfectly for the novel, because it shields the reader from feeling too much of the horrors that occur in the story.

[Read More]

Tue
Mar 11 2014 9:00am
Original Story

“Nothing to Fear” is an episode inspired by The Rule of Three, the opening novel in Eric Walter’s trilogy of the same name about the terrifying challenges faced by an ordinary suburban kid, his family, and his neighbors, in the first days and weeks and months after a viral catastrophe causes the world to go dark. Sixteen-year-old Adam Daley is taking his girlfriend, Lori, on a picnic in his homemade ultralight aircraft—one of the few computer-free machines that still works. He wants to celebrate a surprise anniversary only he knows about (the first time he saw her at a junior high basketball game). But soon, this attempt at a normal date away from the fortified safety of their neighborhood feels increasingly risky. As their gripping misadventure unfolds, it is a reminder for Adam and Lori that there is nothing in particular for them to be afraid of, because in their world there is everything to fear.

This short story was acquired and edited for Tor.com by MacKids editor Wes Adams.

[Read “Nothing to Fear” by Eric Walters]

Mon
Mar 3 2014 6:00pm

Welcome to the YA Roundup, where we give you the low down on YA bookish news, gossip, new releases and cover reveals.

In this week’s news, Children’s Book Week released this year’s poster, the soundtrack for the Divergent movie has been announced and includes a new original Ellie Goulding song, and Cassandra Clare announced a new extension to her Shadowhunter world.

[Read more]

Fri
Feb 28 2014 5:30pm

Nil Lynne Matson review

It all starts when teenager Charley Crowder is snatched out of her ordinary life by a mysterious portal. She’s deposited, naked and confused, in the middle of nowhere on what turns out to be an island not located on any map or chart. Rather than lay down and die, she struggles to survive, and after several weeks, she discovers, much to her surprise, that she’s not alone.

She’s quickly integrated into a community of fellow castaways, other teens stolen from around the world. She’s informed that the island has a name—Nil—and that the only way off is through a portal such as the one that brought her there in the first place. And while Nil, which seems to be at least partially sentient and somewhere between capricious and malevolent, has many rules for survival, the big one is this: if you don’t find your way home within a year, you die. Simple as that. Suddenly, the clock is ticking.

[A Review]

Thu
Feb 27 2014 12:00pm

The Winner's Curse Marie RutkoskiKestrel is the daughter of General Trajan, the Valorian general who conquered the Herran peninsula and enslaved its people. She leads a comfortable, even pampered life in the subjugated Herrani capital. Her real love is music, but with her eighteenth birthday approaching, she will soon be forced to choose between enlisting in the army or marrying. In the first chapter of the novel, Kestrel finds herself purchasing a young male Herrani slave named Arin, who comes advertised as a blacksmith as well as a singer of some talent...

One of the signs you’re reading a good—or at least interesting—book is that you can’t wait to discuss it with friends. So it went with The Winner’s Curse, a promising new YA novel by Marie Rutkoski. Liz Bourke and I ended up reading it more or less simultaneously and, in the process, started chatting about it. After a while, we decided it would make more sense to make this a collaborative review of sorts. So, here we go.

[Read more]

Wed
Feb 26 2014 6:00pm

Teen Spirit Francesca Lia Block

In the wake of her beloved grandmother’s death, Julie’s life seems to crumble. Her mother, a staff writer for a television show, is laid off; without the income, they lose their house and move into an apartment, leaving behind the comfortable home Julie had always known. The one bright spot, as she starts at a new high school, is her new friend Clark, whose cheery nature and odd hats stand out against the conformity of the other students.

As Julie attempts to put her life into a semblance of order, her friendship with Clark grows, as does her mother’s attraction to entirely unsuitable guys. With her home life a disappointment, Julie reaches out in another direction: to the spirit world. But when her attempt to contact her grandmother doesn’t get the desired results, Julie figures that’s that. Right? Then she meets Clark’s unpredictable, charming twin brother, Grant.

One problem: Grant’s been dead for a year. And he occasionally possesses Clark.

[A Review]

Mon
Feb 24 2014 3:00pm

Welcome to the YA Roundup, where we give you the low down on YA bookish news, gossip, new releases and cover reveals.

This week’s news covers the controversy surrounding John Green’s comments on Twilight, The Jungle Book’s return to film, the Kardashians’ book deal (we’ve given up on keeping up with them), and tons of covers to make your eyes glaze over and your wallet cry out for mercy.

[Read More]

Wed
Feb 19 2014 8:30am

Welcome back to the British Genre Fiction Focus, Tor.com’s regular round-up of book news from the United Kingdom’s thriving speculative fiction industry.

In this edition, Patrick Ness—the multiple award-winning author of More Than This and more—makes an impassioned plea about power as it regards reading and writing... a plea which his peer Robert Muchamore describes as “some kind of doom laden literary crisis.”

Who’s in the right? You decide. But the answer is Ness, yes?

Later today, a quick Kitsch, because I couldn’t resist—then this week’s links, in which there’s news of another new Stephen King novel, self-publishing’s poster boy Hugh Howey discusses his specialist subject, and keep your eyes peeled for what must be the best wordplay of the week.

[Read More]