Damage January 21, 2015 Damage David D. Levine Concerning a spaceship's conscience. And the Burned Moths Remain January 14, 2015 And the Burned Moths Remain Benjanun Sriduangkaew Treason is a trunk of thorns. A Beautiful Accident January 7, 2015 A Beautiful Accident Peter Orullian A Sheason story. Kia and Gio January 6, 2015 Kia and Gio Daniel José Older Seven years ago, they went on a secret mission.
From The Blog
January 21, 2015
Don’t Touch That Dial: Midseason SFF
Alex Brown
January 21, 2015
Agent Carter, I Think I’m in Love
Liz Bourke
January 21, 2015
The Illogic of Fairy Tales
Genevieve Cogman
January 16, 2015
Birdman is Actually Just a Muppet Movie
Max Gladstone
January 15, 2015
What Are Your Favorite Non-Sci-Fi/Fantasy TV Shows?
Stubby the Rocket
Wed
Jan 21 2015 10:30am

The Illogic of Fairy Tales

Cinderella Fairy Tale Disney

The trouble with fairy tales is that they’re not fair.

They seem fair enough at first: do the right thing, and you will be rewarded. Be nice to the old woman, help the trapped animals, work hard, get your mother’s blessing, and you can be the lucky child who wins a kingdom, marries the prince/princess, and lives happily ever after. But that all depends on the protagonist having drawn the right combination of cards in the first place: he or she is the lucky third or seventh child, and has a fairy godmother or patron witch, and is a nice person in the first place.

[You only get through a fairy tale by following the rules]

Wed
Jan 21 2015 10:00am

Creatureville: The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen

The Rabbit Back Literature Society review

Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen proposes that places, like people, have particular interests. Some specialise in film; some in food. Others areas boast about an abundance of athletes, or artists, or authors. The small town of Rabbit Back “was known to have no less than six writers’ associations, and that was without counting the most noteworthy writers’ association, the Rabbit Back Literature Society, which accepted members only at Laura White’s invitation.”

Laura White is an almost mythical figure in the Finland of this baffling but beautiful English-language debut, which is fitting considering the contents of her Creatureville series:

The local ceramicists for the most part produced water sprites, pixies, elves, and gnomes. Laura White had made these creatures popular all over the world through her children’s books, but in Rabbit Back in particular you ran into them everywhere you looked. They were presented as prizes in raffles, given as presents, brought to dinner as hostess gifts. There was only one florist in Rabbit Back, but there were seven shops that sold mostly mythological figurines.

[Read More]

Wed
Jan 21 2015 9:00am
Original Story

Damage

In the extremities of war, we may know what we’ve been, but not what we will become. “Damage” is a tale of desperate times, desperate measures, and the inner life of a fighter spacecraft.

This short story was acquired and edited for Tor.com by Senior Editor Patrick Nielsen Hayden.

[Read “Damage” by David Levine]

Wed
Jan 21 2015 8:30am

The Witcher Will Be Back

Sword of Destiny the Witcher

Look forward to much more Geralt of Rivia in the near future, folks!

Gollancz, who published Blood of Elves, Time of Contempt, and Baptism of Fire, announced on Monday morning that they’d acquired a further three books in The Witcher Saga by Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski.

The first book, The Sword of Destiny, will be published in May 2015 alongside the blockbusting new computer game The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt, which won the Award for Most Anticipated Game during The Game Awards 2014. Sales for the previous two games in The Witcher franchise have totalled over 8 million copies worldwide. The Sword of Destiny is a collection of linked short stories which fills in some of the gaps in the Witcher’s legend.

[Read More]

Wed
Jan 21 2015 8:00am

Morning Roundup: We’ll Never Get To Space on Horseback

Yuri Shwedoff White Castle

BoingBoing shared the most beautifully spooky images we’ve seen this week! Yuri Shwedoff’s post-apocalyptic fantasias take familiar objects and ratchet up the feelings of abandonment and existential hopelessness... in a good way. This one, titled White Castle, makes us want to hug the space program. Check out more of Shwedoff’s art here, or follow him on Twitter to see his takes on posters for Interstellar and Guardians of the Galaxy!

Morning Roundup stands up to Satan! Time-traveling kids experience jetlag! Picard adjusts his shirt!

[Plus the first buckets of advice from the deep well of Haruki Murakami’s mind!]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 5:47pm

Daniel José Older’s Bone Street Rumba Series Optioned for TV/Film

Half Resurrection Blues Bone Street Rumba optioned Daniel Jose Older Anika Noni RoseDeadline reports that Anika Noni Rose (Dreamgirls, Disney’s The Princess and the Frog, Elementary) has optioned the TV/film rights to Daniel José Older’s urban fantasy series Bone Street Rumba. The first book of the series, Half-Resurrection Blues, was published January 6 by Roc Books; you can read our review as well as an excerpt of the novel.

Rose has optioned the series through her production company Roaring Virgin Productions. It’s unclear if she plans to adapt the Bone Street Rumba books into a series of films, or if we’ll be seeing another urban fantasy TV series in the future.

[Read more]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 5:00pm

Do That Pazuzu That You Do So Well: Constantine, “The Saint of Last Resorts” (Part 2)

Constantine

When last we left our curmudgeonly British anti-hero, he was dying in a Mexican sewer known as the “Friday 10pm time slot.” Will he survive the move to the 8pm Friday time slot, now that he is armed with the knowledge of the group behind the Rising Darkness?

Spoilers: of course he will, because he’s the title character, which kind of saps the dramatic tension out of an otherwise suitably creepy Exorcist homage.

[Read More]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 4:30pm

The Rabbit Back Literature Society Sweepstakes!

We’ve given you an excerpt from The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen, out today from St. Martin's Press, and now we want to send you a copy of the book! (You can also read Jääskeläinen's Tor.com original novella, “Where the Trains Turn,” here.)

Only nine people have ever been chosen by renowned children’s author Laura White to join the Rabbit Back Literature Society, an elite group of writers in the small town of Rabbit Back. Now a tenth member has been selected: a young literature teacher named Ella, who soon discovers that the Society is not what it seems...

Comment in the post to enter!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A purchase does not improve your chances of winning. Sweepstakes open to legal residents of 50 United States and D.C., and Canada (excluding Quebec). To enter, comment on this post beginning at 4:30 PM Eastern Time (ET) on January 20. Sweepstakes ends at 12:00 PM ET on January 24. Void outside the United States and Canada and where prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules here. Sponsor: Tor.com, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010.

Tue
Jan 20 2015 4:00pm

Short Fiction Spotlight: Uncanny #2, “Folding Beijing” by Hao Jingfang

Uncanny issue 2 Welcome back to the Short Fiction Spotlight, a space for conversation about recent and not-so-recent short stories. For this installment, I wanted to take a look at the second issue of Lynne and Michael Thomas’s newest project, Uncanny Magazine, since I found the first intriguing and enjoyable. I was particularly interested in the story-in-translation that headlines the issue’s fiction selection, “Folding Beijing,” written by Hao Jingfang and translated by Ken Liu.

The January/February issue of Uncanny also contains original work from Sam J. Miller, Amal El-Mohtar, Richard Bowes, and Sunny Moraine; a reprint from Anne Leckie; nonfiction including an essay from Jim C. Hines; and finally a handful of poems and interview. (It’s a little bit of a shame the remit of this column series is just the fiction, sometimes—there’s some other very good stuff here too.)

[Onward.]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 3:30pm

Always Wear Your Rubbers: Gotham, “What The Little Bird Told Him”

gotham

I’m starting to think that Gotham might be the best comic book adaptation to ever make it to the small screen. That doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good; I’ve still got my problems with it (then again, what do I know? It’s already been renewed for a second season). But ongoing serial superhero comics are all about the illusion of change, with Bold New Directions that circle right back to the beginning. At best, this allows our decades-old heroes to tip-toe forward in emotional and narrative progress, but in such a way that feels almost invisible to the reader.

By that assessment, Gotham is doing a remarkable of job of pretending like it’s going somewhere, or that its story is somehow progressing, when in fact, we’re just spinning our wheels. Or perhaps a more appropriate metaphor, given the topic of the episode, would be the Electric Slide, since we’re basically just shuffling left and right and then turning around in a square.

[Read More]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 3:00pm

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: “Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges”

Star Trek Deep Space 9, inter arma enim silent leges“Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges”
Written by Ronald D. Moore
Directed by David Livingston
Season 7, Episode 16
Production episode 40510-565
Original air date: March 3, 1999
Stardate: unknown

Station log. Kira is running a meeting that includes Cretak, Worf, Odo, and O’Brien, discussing repair schedules and shore leave requirements and other such fun stuff, which includes a great deal of snarking back and forth between Worf and Cretak on the subject of their respective nations’ prosecution of the war and need for shore leave.

Cretak is off to a conference on Romulus, which Bashir is also attending. Garak and Bashir discuss the conference—Garak was less than impressed with Romulus when he was assigned there as an agent of the Obsidian Order—and then Bashir is awakened in the middle of the night by Sloan, who says that Section 31 has an assignment for him: to gather data about the Romulan leadership, to take the pulse of the Romulan government. Bashir doesn’t like the idea of working for 31, nor does he like the idea of spying on an ally. Sloan points out that they’re a temporary ally at best, and he’s just there to gather information. Sloan predicts that, when the war ends and the Dominion retreats to the Gamma Quadrant, the Federation and the Romulans will be the only significant powers left, as the Klingons will take a decade to recover from the war and the Cardassians will be an occupied nation.

[Like most human expressions, completely devoid of meaning.]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 2:30pm

Fox Signs Director Mark Mylod for Minority Report Pilot

Minority Report pilot Fox director Mark Mylod

Fox is prepping a Minority Report TV pilot, intended as a sequel to the 2002 film starring Tom Cruise. However, don’t expect to see Cruise or his character John Anderton, as the pilot is set 10 years after the movie and will focus on one of the “precogs” from the film. In fact, Fox hasn’t announced casting at all, but it has signed on a director: Mark Mylod, known for ABC’s Once Upon a Time and Showtime’s Golden Globe-winning The Affair.

[Read more]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 2:00pm

We Paint A Happy Little Serial Killer in Sleepy Hollow: “Pittura Infamante”

Sleepy Hollow Pittura Infamante

So the Sleepy Hollow team is talking about the fact that Season 2 has not been as good. Apparently some execs feel that it became too serialized, but I would argue that they added too many side characters, when the central relationships were squandered. People started saying “Ichabbie” for a reason. They practically kicked Captain Irving, a great, a compelling twist on the cliché of the Angry Black Police Chief, most of the way off the show. Finally, and most problematic, they ignored the mystery of the Mills sisters and their mother (the thing that produced the most compelling hour of the season, “Mama”) to focus on the Crane’s marital troubles, with an extra dose of Headless angst.

I’m not sure that last night’s Katrina-centric episode is the right move, but, it mostly worked as a tense, Monster-of-the-Week entry, and we did get some great Mills sister banter.

[Plus more Irving, and no Hawley!]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 1:45pm

Day Four Follows The Three

Day Four Sarah Lotz

The Three was without question one of the best and most hellish horror novels released in recent years. As I concluded in my review, Sarah Lotz’s “nightmarish indictment of contemporary culture [was] assiduously ambiguous, brilliantly balanced, carefully controlled and in the final summation fantastically crafted,” so I’m on board for Day Four, the “unforgettable sequel” Hodderscape revealed recently.

Day Four appears to shift the focus of The Three from the skies to the seas.

[Read More]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 1:05pm

“A Day in the Life” Documentary Will Show How Your Game of Thrones Sausage Gets Made

Game of Thrones A Day in the Life season 5 documentary

While season 5 of HBO’s Game of Thrones won’t start until April 12, the network is tiding fans over with “A Day in the Life,” a short behind-the-scenes documentary airing February 8. HBO has just released a trailer, reminding us just how many people work together to make each episode of Game of Thrones happen.

[Watch the trailer]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 1:00pm

The Wheel of Time Reread Redux: The Eye of the World, Part 15

The Wheel of Time Reread Redux, blog without end, Amen! Today’s Redux post will cover Chapter 27 and 28 of The Eye of the World, originally reread in this post.

All original posts are listed in The Wheel of Time Reread Index here, and all Redux posts will also be archived there as well. (The Wheel of Time Master Index, as always, is here, which has links to news, reviews, interviews, and all manner of information about the Wheel of Time in general on Tor.com.)

The Wheel of Time reread is also now available as an ebook series, except for the portion covering A Memory of Light, which should become available soon.

All Reread Redux posts will contain spoilers for the entire Wheel of Time series, so if you haven’t read, read at your own risk.

And now, the post!

[“I like Mass better in Latin. It’s nicer when you don’t know what they’re saying.”]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 12:30pm

Tor.com is on Hiatus From Short Fiction Submissions From February Through April

The minds behind Tor.com’s original short fiction program love our slush pile. Some of our favorite fiction has been pulled from the ranks of our unsolicited submissions. Because we take our mission of publishing great fiction by new authors seriously, we have decided to go on hiatus from accepting submissions in order to respond to the large quantity of stories we have on consideration. Tor.com will not be accepting submissions starting February 1st until May 1st.

Tue
Jan 20 2015 12:30pm

Mort(e) Sweepstakes!

Mort(e) by Robert Repino arrives today from Soho Press, and we want to send you a copy right now!

The “war with no name” has begun, with human extinction as its goal. The instigator of this war is the Colony, a race of intelligent ants who, for thousands of years, have been silently building an army that would forever eradicate the destructive, oppressive humans. Check out our excerpt and Pop Quiz at the End of the Universe with Repino to find out more about the book!

Comment in the post below to enter!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A purchase does not improve your chances of winning. Sweepstakes open to legal residents of 50 United States and D.C., and Canada (excluding Quebec). To enter, comment on this post beginning at 12:30 PM Eastern Time (ET) on January 20. Sweepstakes ends at 12:00 PM ET on January 24. Void outside the United States and Canada and where prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules here. Sponsor: Tor.com, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010.

Tue
Jan 20 2015 12:00pm

Reopening the Time Loop: 12 Monkeys

12 Monkeys Pilot

I’ve been a fan of Terry Gilliam ever since the first time I watched Monty Python & the Holy Grail—which of course, was before I saw any of his post-Monty Python films. And of those wonderful, wonderful movies that he’s made in the intervening years, 12 Monkeys has always ranked at the top of my list of personal favorites. I’m a sucker for a good time travel flick, and the bleak determinism of 12 Monkeys has always appealed; how the film creates a complete and concise circle of cause and effect.

As such, upon hearing the news of the 12 Monkeys television adaptation on SyFy Channel, I found myself torn: on one hand, I love that story and universe so so so so so much that I was eager to see it explored in a new and modern context. On the other hand, my adoration of the original film (to say nothing of La Jetee) has a lot to do with the perfectness of its cyclical paradox. Going into the SyFy series, I couldn’t help but wonder: how is it even possible to extend such a perfectly structured time travel story into an ongoing series?

But then I watched the pilot episode and leaned back in my seat and thought, “Damn. All right. I’m in.”

[Read More]

Tue
Jan 20 2015 11:40am

Alastair Reynolds Roundup

alaistair reynolds poseidon's wake

Late last week Gollancz unveiled the Abi Hartshorne art set to grace Poseidon’s Wake, complete with a colourful new cover look for Blue Remembered Earth and On the Steel Breeze, the other volumes of the “informal trilogy” this third book concludes:

Poseidon’s Wake is a stand-alone story which follows two extraordinary characters as they begin to unravel some of the greatest mysteries of our universe. Their missions are dangerous, and both are venturing into the unknown... but if either can uncover the secret to faster-than-light travel, then new worlds will be at our fingertips.

But innovation and progress are not always embraced by everyone. There is a saboteur at work. Different factions disagree about the best way to move forward. And the mysterious Watchkeepers are ever-present.

Poseidon’s Wake is due out in April in the UK. But that’s not the only Alastair Reynolds news that’s been doing the rounds recently...

[Read More]