Rothfuss Reread: The Slow Regard of Silent Things Part 1: A Seemly Place

[email protected]

Doubtful. He'd already reduced commitments and appearances next year. Folks have this perception of D3 getting continually pushed back 'cause they keep wanting to believe it's just around the corner. It's been clear for a long time that 2017 was about the earliest we could expect it.

Rothfuss Reread: The Slow Regard of Silent Things Part 1: A Seemly Place

Cheapass Games has posted its Tak rules as an open beta.

In April 2014, James Ernest and Patrick Rothfuss worked together to create a new classic pub game, Pairs. During that endeavor, they also agreed to set down the rules for Tak. Now, 18 months later, we proudly present an open beta version of this new abstract strategy game.

They're looking for feedback from folks who actually want to try it out and try to break it. A redditor played it several times today and seems pretty positive. You can check out hir thoughts here.

Tak will be in open beta until roughly February 2016. Shortly thereafter, we will launch a Kickstarter project to manufacture the game. We will be shooting for a $40 boxed game, with pieces and a 6x6 board, and we might also make a $25 "Traveler's Bag" with a 5x5 set inside, but no board. These prices are complete guesses, because we don't yet know much about making pieces like this.

Rothfuss Reread: The Slow Regard of Silent Things Part 1: A Seemly Place
[email protected] It's the apparent longevity of the seven that makes it technically possible. We already assume them to have been acting on a vast scale. In vulgar terms,"What do y'all wanna do this millennium?" "How 'bout we try to take over the world?" " We can smear the Amyr for laughs!"
Rothfuss Reread: The Slow Regard of Silent Things Part 1: A Seemly Place
[email protected] Technically, sure. Incredibly odd considering the policies of the empire; but if folks can think Arcanists are Amyr, this should be allowable. I'm thinking of a specific passage in a specific book that's not handy, but it appears to have been a common artistic practice during the Renaissance.
Rothfuss Reread: The Slow Regard of Silent Things Part 1: A Seemly Place
Hi. Howre you folks doin'? Thanks for asking after me. I'm still trying to people individually. [email protected] Great list. I can add to a few of them real quick.
Tree - Is a kitchen so maybe refers to the tree's role in producing fruit? Also I vaguely recall a water source in the room that might be tree-like?
This one's in the text. "Pans were nearly all the fruit that Tree could offer up." It's the pantry. There's a video haunting YouTube where he provides the riddle that spawned it.
No idea: The Twelve, Rubric, Pickering, Downing, Wains, most others
"Rub" for rubedo; "bric"for brick. Rubeus brick, the "round red-brick tunnels." It doubles as an alchemical symbol, too. There are lots of them. Rubric is the structure that winds under the entire University, which makes it metonymically symbolic of what's above. I imagine that years of grading from a rubric influenced that one.
Wains
Wains is more straightforward. It's reference to wain defined as a horse drawn cart: "The hallway was wide enough to drive a wagon through;" wainscot with, ""wood paneling hugged the lower portion of the walls;" and to the condition of the once great hallway in decay, or on the wane. [email protected]
"Better still, the slow regard of silent things wafted off the moisture in the air." Anyone got an idea why such a casual title drop?
It's not entirely casual. It's in "WHAT A LOOK ENTAILS." It makes some sense to contrast a look with a slow regard. But it's in the book at all because he's dropped every chapter title within the chapter itself. (Except "HOLLOW," which gets dropped in the following chapter for reasons.) It's a bit of structural artistry we might expect in the next book. Several of the chapters in The Kingkiller Chronicle are name for lines within them, but I don't think it's true all the time like it is here.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] I'd thought about Shehyn, but figured it might still be worth mentioning the beginning of Hespe's story. There's really nothing stopping the story from fitting somewhat properly within what the Adem remember or believe. We know there was a period of time when Shapers within the empire explored the limits of what was possible. Silver fruit and whatnot. So imagine, I guess, the story of Jax starting there. The world is already full or bent names before Faen is created and long before the moon is stolen. I'm not asserting unequivocally that's what happened, but I don't think they're incommensurate, Part XII is up, or has begin anyway.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] Haliax and Selitos fully agreed that the world was broken, their disagreement came in later in the approach on how to proceed with it. Haliax wants to destroy it... I'll start by saying that I think, like most folks who've weighed in, that the nature of the oppositional structure you posit is more or less correct. I'm just not sure we can say definitively that the Seven are on the side of annihilation. I'm always leary of that interpretation since it's utterd by Selitos in a pro-Selitos story. A lot of what Lanre/Haliax says in that narrative might suggest he ways to destroy the world but they;re really talking about Myr Tariniel. Stripped of Selitos's summary, Lanre's commentary might be more about its inhabitants than Temerant writ large. Even in "Tehlu's Watchful Eye," the Amyr's only remit is to counfound the Chandrian. That's the greater good. They're not about any more significant motive without our, or Tehlin Aturan dogma, placing it there. [email protected] (& [email protected])
It seems like the group led by Iax/Jax who we generally call the Shapers were the ones who "broke" the world by doing things like changing the "natural" position of the moon.
"The Boy Who Loved the Moon" opens with Jax in a broken house at the end of a broken road. At the very least, doesn't this suggest the possibility of a world already "broken" long before the creation of Faen and the theft of the moon? While we don't have the full story from either Hespe or Felurian or both together, it might be worth considering that detail . @Jumbles and KateH Other than that, knowing what naming should and shouldn't be used for seems to be less important than being able to name. and I think in that moment [Elodin] was more concerned about the implications for the world than for the person changing their name. I think both of these are on the nose. The Naming Elodin's teaching is amoral. It's power they can have and have over things. Elodin's only charge is guiding those with demonstrated ability to some degree of control. The only ethics are in not deploying the power by accident. And I think that KateH is probably right about his concern for the world. We suspect that Lanre is the only being to have changed his own name and that appears to have had some negative consequences. The TSRoST read continues. Parts X (HOLLOW) and XI (THE ANGRY DARK) are done. KateH went into more detail about the plate pattern in the comments.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected]
But the shape of a leaf and the properties of a given type of wood are not dependent on the words for them in any language. Is Rothfuss pointing to something here, or not? Does D's patron have something to do with a spear? Or are we over-analyzing?
That's kind of what we do. Sometimes it pans out. Sometimes it doesn't. Other than the ah/elm scene, "spear" is shockingly infrequent.
The draccus reared again, coming down hard on the tree. I watched, certain that it was about to impale itself on the broken limb, but the jagged spear of hard wood barely dimpled its chest before splintering. The draccus crashed into the trunk, and though it didn't snap, it fractured with a sound like a crack of lightning. (NW 617)
...and...
Manet glared at me while he gathered in the cards. "Here's a primer for admissions." He held up his hand, three fingers spearing angrily into the air. "Let's say you have three spades in your hand, and there have been five spades laid down." (WMF 59)
Pretty much confirms that Manet is her patron. Part IX.ii is up. Both parts of IX have drawings Nate did for the book that didn't make it into the published version.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
I can't remember if anyone ever mentioned the following. It feels like something I just stumbled on and I'm not sure if it's meaningful or not. This first bit's from The Name of the Wind when Kvothe's trying to come up with a nickname for Denna's patron.
"Fine," I said, as I fished the leaf out of my mouth. It was yellow, shaped like a spearhead. "The wind has decided for us. Master Ash." "Are you sure it isn't Master Elm?" she asked, eyeing the leaf. "It's a common mistake.""Tastes like an ash," I said. "Besides, elm is feminine." She nodded seriously, though her eyes were dancing. "Ash it is then."
And the second is from Felurian's admonishment to Kvothe that the Fae have indeed visited the four corners fairly often and he's heard plenty of stories about them.
"many of the darker sort would love to use you for their sport. what keeps these from moonlit trespass? iron, fire, mirror-glass. elm and ash and copper knives, solid-hearted farmer's wives who know the rules of games we play and give us bread to keep away. but worst of all, my people dread the portion of our power we shed when we set foot on mortal earth."
Anyway. Both ash and elm end up pointing toward and way from the fae. Does this have any bearing on folks' opinions about who Ash is? In other news Part XII.ii and Part IX.i of Reading The Slow Regard of Silent Things are up.
Rothfuss Reread: The Wise Man’s Fear, Part 3: Or Something Like That
[email protected] Well, for anyone keeping track, the end of Slow Regard lines up with chapter 11. Thanks to this detailed reread for making it easy to search for it, since I don't have a PDF version of the book. If you're interested in that sort of thing, I'm doing one for TSRoST at The Larkin Ledgers. Some of the commenters have worked out a pretty detailed timeline comparison.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected]
As for nutmeg: you can get high off of it, but it'll land you with the worstest little hangover you even done saw.
I'll keep that in mind. Maybe there's a shift from euphoria to delirium to discomfort before she evens out. Big [email protected]
In short, doing work that she's familiar with brings back memories of who she is, which leads her to slide into madness.
That's kind of what I was going for. Once she's done with the repair, she's on the run. Thanks for fleshing it out. I haven't had the chance to link it until now, but Part VII.i went up. it's one of two on BEAUTIFUL AND BROKEN, dealing with the ring elements and some callbacks to the the KKC.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected]
If that's the case then maybe The Woman would be important for the kingkilling rather than or in addition to the Chandrian.
The whole thing about the Chandrian being outside the Kvothe legends, with the exception of Chronciler's goad, thus far in the frame and the narrative is dead on. But this part here is especially insightful. The woman is what gets Kote talking. [email protected]
I think there's one important thing people haven't picked upon. The Underthing is a Renaissance Era city.
I wanna second the welcome! I mentioned this in one of the early blogs. Wains in particular has all the trappings of the Italian Renaissance. Pat's actually said the setting is more like Renaissance Europe than anything else, with several variations. Ryan [email protected]
Does anyone have any references for the age of the university? I'm thinking a few hundred years, but probably not more than 5 or 6?
Elodin says it was built on the ruins of an older University. I've maintained for awhile now that it's limited by the end of the Aturan Empire mainly 'cause they wouldn't have put up with a bunch of loose canons mucking about with demonic forces better left alone. So three centuries, give or take a few years. Big [email protected]
By the way, PR is technically correct when he says that the oily residue Auri squeezed from the nutmeg seeds mixed with ester solution contains tetradecanoic acid (better know as myristic acid, for which nutmeg is one of the main sources). Having this acid in the soap mix will allow for other active substances to be absorbed through the skin (through the process called myristoilation), and esters of this acid are used in cosmetic preparations all over the world today to enhance the absorbance of whatever active substances are included in the prep.
I love this. It was brought up in another discussion and some folks suggested that the stuff she factored out of the nutmeg could be hallucinogenic, accounting for the rather ethereal descriptions that follow. Someone cited an old text on alchemical cosmetics. And someone else dug up tweets Pat posted in January about trying to extract tetradecanoic acid from nutmeg. Thanks for the explanation.
So, I think that copper is really not nameless material, it has a name and it tells a story, but instead it's resistent to Shaping
So, like, you can name it but you can't change it? Part VII.iii is up, looking at why Auri goes crazypants after repairing the pipe.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] 1) Bombadilic Point of interest. Pat lurves Tom Bombadil. In a couple interviews (maybe a blog, too) he waxes eloquent about what Tom means to LotR and why he's anything but episodic and is, in fact, critical to the meaning. I hadn't consdidered Auri that way before, but I could see him trying that. 4) The candle comes first. [email protected] 3) Hollow appears 13 times, twice as the chapter title. Auri's described as hollow both before Kvothe and after/during. More after, to be honest. But looking quickly made me want to look closely. Thanks for pointing it out. 4) That's lovely; "we actually hear Auri..." I'm still not a fan, but this is the most convincing paragraph I remember seeing. Part VII.ii is up. I couldn't help bringing rings and some alchemy into it.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Ryan [email protected] The narrator isn't exactly Auri, but I take your point. Taken too far, it puts us in the same position we are when speculation about unreliable narrative voices in The Kingkiller Chronicle gets out of hand. Most of it should be relaible, otherwise there's no reason for the story. I figured the upside down/right side up thing was probably about the proper way of doing things. I took her action to be legitimate since she didn't even agonize about a possible trade. It's sorta the same with the Amyr. In the parent text, we're told that not all of the stories about them are bad; we just don't get to hear any. Part VII.i is up.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Matt_P@192
Auri notes that the milk is for the fairies but why does she feel free to take the bread?
It's all about the position of the dinnerware:
A wooden plate covered with an overturned wooden bowl rested there. Beside it was a bowl of clay, covered with a glazed clay plate. Auri lifted the wooden bowl and found a piece of fresh brown bread beneath. It held health and heart and hearth. A lovely thing, and full of invitation. She put it in her pocket. She knew the other bowl held milk, but the plate that covered it faced up. It was not for her. She left it for the faeries. (71)
Both the milk and the bread are, probably, intended for the faeries by the inhabitants. Felurian mentions, "solid-hearted farmer's wives who know the rules of games we play and give us bread to keep away. But there are apparently nuances to the game. Besides tending to things, Auri's apparently also a strict rules lawyer. stevenhalter@197 That could work. The figurine she finds is unusual in its depiction of an Amyr as sweet and kind compared to most of the KKC so far. It would make sense that it's part of a reconsideration. JohnPoint@197 I'm still of the opinion that the Ruach were distinct from humans. There's an old interview with Speculate where he talks about the Creation War era folks. I'll try to find it. Part VI.iii is up.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Ryan [email protected]
Auri is a Shaper. We see her very carefully learning what things are already called. Their existing name. She changes what things are. Their nature does not change, but they are re-formed and re-shaped. This scares the hell out of her, which strikes me as a perfectly rational response.
I took Auri "learning what things are already called. Their existing name." to mean that she was more philosophically similar to the old name knowers Felurian talked about who "knew the fox and they knew the hare, and they knew the space between the two." Or the hermit in "The Boy Who Loved the Moon" who encouraged Jax to listen. She seems to be trying anyway. Trying not to interefere with anything unless she has to. Or unless it's for someone else, like she does with Kvothe's candle. I agree that she seems to be a capable shaper, but it looked like she was almost illustrating the difference between the two sides. As for her name, I think this line lends some metaphorical support to what you're suggesting:
It was one thing to be private. But to have no name at all? How horrible. How lonely.
But I don't know if TSRoST actually confirms that her name was changed. I looked for phrases in NotW and WMF similar or identical to "Her name was burning like a fire inside her." and couldn't come up with anything conclusive. When aleph changes the angels, there's some fire imagery but nothing within. No names. In WMF everything that burns like a fire inside is emotional. Anger. I really wanted that to be the key, but if there is one it must be under some other rug. Good post. Lots to think about. (PS: Part VI.ii is up.)
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected]
I think Foxen is made of copper, perhaps a figurine(?). There are chemicals (luminol + others), that when placed on copper produce a blue glow.
That's interesting. I'm pretty sure it's more of a stone or coin or ingot typre of thing than a figurine. In WMF Kvothe descibes something the size of a coin and in TSRoST it's slightly larger than a coin. I mean, there's nothing stopping it from just being a copper coin, to be honest. The blue glow of luminol itself seems pretty short lived, but it's a good place to start. Thanks for pointing it out. Part VI.i is up. The first chapter is kinda dense, so I broke it up a bit.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] Did Jo ever do a post on The Lightning Tree? As in an analysis/speculation post. Not yet. I reckon I'll take a look at it after I finish The Slow Regard of Silent Things. Part V is up.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
@174/5
I know what you mean about SR feeling more reliable than KKC. Probably that is an effect of the third person style.
It's the truth. First person narrators are always unreliable; regardless of whether they're honest. TSRoST grabs some unreliablility from staying inside Auri's personal space. She knows wrong things, for example. But the narrative nonethless presents that accurately. Part IV, on the Dedication, Vi Hart, and Tunnel Bob, is up.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
@167/8 There's a lot there tying TSRoST to that particular point in WMF and I'm pretty sure he actually noted that readers could figure out where/when it takes place. @JohnPoint, it took me a bit to find the discrepancy about preferring Auri as a guide and then going in every night after working in the Fishery. I wonder if it's reconcilable by comparing her sleep schedule? I'll defintely take a look as I go through. Post III is up.
Rothfuss Reread: Timeline
[email protected] see comment 33, which is mostly accurate. Years are 359 days.
A New Novella from Patrick Rothfuss’ Kingkiller Chronicles Series Arrives November 2014!
I'm putting my thoughts about TSRoST together in a blog called The Larkin Ledgers. It's spoilery and a bit utidy as of yet. Third post went up recently.
A New Novella from Patrick Rothfuss’ Kingkiller Chronicles Series Arrives November 2014!
SPOILER WARNING Wetlandernw, stevenhalter, and mutantalbinocrocodile, I wanna offer an alternative to the Auri-as-victim scenario. That was my first thought, too, and I was honestly kind of disappointed that he'd travel such a well worn path and reinforce that particular story. In discussion with a couple other folks, I came to suspect something else. Auri's modus operandi seems to revolve around non-interference - being small and hiden and quiet - as though she finds exerting her own will upon the world for her own desires to be wrong. With that in mind, take a look at the paragraph stevenhalter quoted with the paragraph before it. She's talking about Fulcrum, but it also provides additional context for the "wrist pinned" bit.
She could still feel him in her hands. She saw the lines of his sharp edges kissed into her skin. Coming to her feet she shuffled stiffly down the stairs. Her steps were numb and stumbling as more thoughtless step-stones tried to trip her, like a daft old man who won't stop telling an unfunny joke yet and again. She knew. She should have moved more gently with the world. She knew the way of things. She knew if you weren't always stepping lightly as a bird the whole world came apart to crush you. Like a house of cards. Like a bottle against stones. Like a wrist pinned hard beneath a hand with the hot breath smell of want and wine. . . .
Seems entirely possible that Auri wasn't the victim, but the aggressor. Seems to make more sense with her apparent regret and/or fear about wanting.
A Day in the Life of Bast: Patrick Rothfuss’s “The Lightning Tree”
I'm taking a look at The Slow Regard of Silent Things at The Larkin Ledgers. I reckon I'll do "The Lighting Tree" after that. Then start working through some of the other stuff.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Taking a stab at organizing my thoughts on The Slow Regard of Silent Things at The Larkin Ledgers. Spoilery and kind of messy.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Gonna go with, "A meteor rent Vintas," 'cause it fits ever so well with "since that time the land has broken and the sky changed," and could quite literally be a piece of the moon.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
"I don't go in for spoilers or anything. I'm just saying there's only so many ways you can anagram "En Temerant Voistra." (Pat)
here: https://twitter.com/PatrickRothfuss/status/510545943159394304
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Pat's AMA is open. http://www.reddit.com/r/Fantasy/comments/2a97v1/patrick_rothfuss_and_the_worldbuilders_team_ask/ Answers will begin at 7pm CST I asked, "How's the road to Tinue?"
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
PSA: Reddit Fantasy is hosting AMAs with Terry Brooks (7-8) and Pat (7-9) in support of this week's Worldbuilders event if y'all wanna ask 'em any questions. edit: dates, the Terry Brooks AMA is today
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] (and [email protected])
But is there any good evidence to put the Caluptena burning after Atur was founded?
Yes. There are, like, six mentions of Caluptena. The evidence suggests it was burned by the church within the Imperial period, probably early on. Caudicus's genealogy speculates that records of the Lackless might go back further than nine hundred years "if not for the burning of Caluptena." We know the establishment church itself extends back about a thoussand years both because that's how far their records go and via Trapis's rough estimate. And there's this:
"The University has the most open-minded atmosphere since the church burned Caluptena to the ground."
Like a lot this stuff, it has to be cobbled together from multiple data points. We can get a good idea about the church and the Lackless and the Empire. And we can use that to get a rough idea for when Caluptena burned.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
Ryan H @45 Jo indicated she'd be doing a post about "The Lightning Tree." Prolly just givin' folks some time to read it. While there's no spoiler policy other than that the posts and the comments will contain all kinds of spoilers, chances are we'll all get more out of the discussion when that post goes up.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
A little snippet of Four Corners history appears in the upcoming Pairs rulebook:
Pairs exists in one form or another throughout the civilized world, from Vintas and the Commonwealth to the farthest corners of the small kingdoms. In his seminal history, The Chains of Empire*, Etregan speculated that the game originated in Atur, and was spread by conquest, Just as Atur brought rule of law, common language, and a standardized system of time-keeping to the lands it subjugated. Many scholars disagree, citing as evidence Modegan decks that appear to predate Atur's expansion by more than 400 years. Others point out iconography in Aturan decks that predates the empire and seems to originate in pre-plague Caluptena. The game's origin seems lost to history, with countless regions having their own decks and variations of play.
Nothing, like, earth shattering there, but it does make the game as old or slightly older than the earliest surviving mention of the Loeclos family name. And it marks pre-plague and post-plague eras for Caluptena. * not to be confused with Araman Ashbride's monograph "Shackles of Empire," Feltemi Reis's Fall of Empire, or Greggor the Lesser's The Fall of Empire
A Day in the Life of Bast: Patrick Rothfuss’s “The Lightning Tree”
It's far more satisfying than "How Old Holly Came to Be" was in terms of story and structure and shows off a bit of what I've really come to appreciate about Rothfuss's work. I reckon anyone who's spent time with Jo's Reread will be pleased on a few levels. I'm looking forward to the spoiler discussion. [email protected] Thanks for the outsider perspective. It's hearteneing to see that it worked for you. Like Jo, I have no critical distance.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 3)
[email protected] Reckon they don't own the images. Also reckon a gallery has been linked in the last four posts. Here's one RR:WCWL2.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 2)
JohnPoint@52 That was my first thought as well, so, subjectively, great catch. However, folks who have read it suggest it takes place before that day. At this point I'm inclined to believe them. There's definitely enough there to dig into when Jo posts about it.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 2)
Edit: wow, this entire thing got eaten... I suppose I'll take a crack at reconstructing it as time permits... I found the summary jumbles did of the Fela card:
Modeg is very insular. There is very little travel between towns in Modeg. It is implied that Denna is not from Modeg. At the very least she doesn't look like she's from Modeg.* Modeg was never conquered by the Aturan Empire and so has its own religion.** Women are more equal to men in Modeg. Women in Modeg are often educators. Scenes from classical education could include Teccam in his cave or Feltemi Reis teaching the Gallocians (spelling?) how to be bastards.
*this came up when Shane wanted to differentiate Fela from Denna **this is essentially what he said at a signing in 2011 and has been lately reinforced by his comments about the Pairs deck and the bit of The Tale of Laniel Young Again he's shared Fela's skin tone is characteristic of Modegans. They are non-white. Other than this card and the descriptor "dusky," however, Pat hasn't provided a definite reference point. The Hearts are, quite honestly, lovers. Stanchion and Deoch are an obvious, and bold, choice for the king. Simmon and Fela are also perfect choices, both for their reltionship to one another and their connection to Kvothe. Simmon is literally the only person in the series that he's expressed love for. And Fela, in addition to being the most beautiful woman at the University, made repeated and unacknowledged advances toward him. The Spades are, if you will, double edged. [email protected] came upon this independently, but Pat noted that they're often the cards you either really want or really don't. Bast's secrecy, the difference between Kvothe the Arcan and Kvothe Kingkiller, and Denna's mystery all fit nicely. Oh. Stanchion is holding a coin between his fingers. It was initially supposed to be a talent but the coloring suggests it's a mark.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 2)
re: [email protected] (and there was much rejoicing)
Everyone -- I just read the Bast novella, and wow. So I will be writing about it in the kind of insane detail to which we have become accustomed.
For folks who have not read it, a teaser (the beginning) has been posted at Pat's Fantasy Hotlist: http://fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com.es/2014/05/extract-from-rogues-edited-by-george-r_13.html
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 2)
[email protected] Is there a picture of the back of the cards somewhere? TheYllest put up a good quality image gallery up at http://imgur.com/a/9nDzO. Here's a key for it:
I'll do this in the order presented in the gallery. Box (Back): Kvothe on Tarbean rooftops Box (Front): bridge over the Omethi River, Achives visible Poker Chips "Wary" Coin Red Unlimited Edition card back Gaff Card: Willem Joker: Auri (based on Felicia Day) Joker: Elodin (based on Neil Gaiman) JD: Ambrose (based on Jim Butcher) QD: Devi KD: Kilvin AD: suit icon (Kilvin's Lamps) JC: Kvothe - Troupe/Waystone QC: Laurian KC: Arliden AC: suit icon (Arliden's Lute) JH: Simmon QH: Fela KH: Stanchion/Deoch AH: suit icon (Talent Pipes) JS: Bast and "girlfriend" QS: Denna KS: Kvothe AS: suit icon (Folly) Bookplate: Lorren
And you can find a few other images along with available items at http://www.albinodragon.com/name-of-the-wind/.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
Valyrian@92
what issues with the 4C are you talking about? Geographical questions? Because if you are talking about elements and their properties I'd like to know how you can be so sure, considering that we know even less than Kvothe about alchemy.
I am talking about the physical/material/electromagnetic issues explored recently in this thread. I can be so sure because I know more about alchemy than you do, or Kvothe claims to, for that matter. [email protected]
But my puzzle was rather whether the world reflects mediaeval science; and the presence of calcium suggests it doesn't; it must contain the kind of things we call elements, rather than being a world whose basic constituents are earth, air, fire and water, and in which there are just seven metals, etc.
My intention was not to derail your inquiry, but rather to affirm that, yes, 4C science is aware of Renaissance/Enlightenment elements and that, in fact, that is commensurate with other aspects of the setting - social, political, technological - and Pat's own description of same. I plucked out calcium 'cause we discovered it after 1800, which should have, and apparently did, dispell any notion of Medieval-esque science. On the other hand, alchemy persisted into the 1700s and a few of the first recorded observations and/or isolations of elements were made by alchemists. [email protected] Arsenic in the 4C appears to function just like Earth-616 Arsenic. I know you were just grabbing an example, but, y'know, it marks a point of similarity. Heck, I'm not even sure why you assert that iron and copper have different electromagnetic properties in the 4C.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
[email protected]
Which, in turn, means that 4C moon doesn't have significant mass either... Otherwise it would have greatly affected things by it's mass...
I reckon its mass is negligible or somehow has a negligible effect on the world of the Four Corners. I'm willing to accept that a wizard did it since, according to the text, that's what happened. [email protected]
An aside about the map: if it represents the whole world then it must be flat as the ends don't meet
stevenhalter mentioned this in @74, but I guess it bears repeating. The Four Corners are only a portion of the world. We've sourced this a few time throughout the reread. [email protected]
(Are there any substances mentioned that were discovered more recently - e.g. alumin[i]um?)
Off the top of my head, calcium. That's still consistent with a roughly Renaissance-ish setting. [email protected]
(Thistle) Do you have a source for your key to the Faen deck or are those just your guesses?
I cobbled multiples sources together to form the key. Pat mentioned Remmen (2) in his cloak of autumn leaves and a loincloth on his blog. I referenced it a thread or two back. The only Faen card I can't easily source is the fifth (7), which nonetheless matches Skarpi's description. I should have marked it as such. It would be pointless for me to post up a bunch of guesses... [email protected]
For example, the world could be based off of alcemical properties rather than modern physics. Since alchemy works, ...
It's a great "for example." But I can't stress enough that alchemical principles wouldn't account for the issues folks have with the 4C.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
[email protected] Don't forget Felurian's "eyes shining in the dark." Perhaps the organs of Faen sight are manufactured to the same standards as the legendary lamp. Or, alternatively, the lamps themselves might have provided their lasting illumination via Faen eyes.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
[email protected] Key to Nate's Faen deck: 1. Felurian 2. Remmen
Totally not Kvothe
3. Bastas 4. Sithe (White Riders) 5. Double Ring of Greystones 6. Tehlin Priests
Not Amyr. One appears to be a Penitent. This is the biggest surprise. I don't even.
7. Mortal Guests
Auri Elodin Hank Green (Internet Guy) Kvothe Skarpi Tinker (Ben?) Veronica Belmont (from The Sword & Laser)
8. Faerie Revel 9. not shown 10. Cthaeh's Tree
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
[email protected] At the moment, only the Amyr card (see http://www.cheapass.com/sites/default/files/Name7LG.jpg) has leaves. Looking at it, and respecting JohnPoint's post, Shane may just use that shape to represent leaves. I hadn't looked at them for awhile. I'm trying not to let the Royals card (see http://www.cheapass.com/sites/default/files/NameRoyalLG.jpg), with the King (Pat) in red and gold, get to me.
Rothfuss Reread: What Can We Learn From The Name of the Wind Playing Cards? (Part 1)
From the hangouts during the Kickstarter campaign... The Kvothe-side is Tarbean. The wagon-side is toward the University. The road runs from one to the other. The grey block in the background of the wagon-side is the archives. The bridge spans the Omethi. Scale and, um, I guess continuity, were less of a concern than iconic imagery. Around the time Shane left Albino Dragon, the videos were taken down. I have some notes and jumbles posted some as well. I'll try to share those when they're relevant.
A word about the leaf. It's bigger here, and at a different angle, but clearly the same leaf. Anyone have any idea what kind of tree it's from? (Jo's OP)
Ash. Probably, anyway. Hard to see too clearly and my box isn't handy, but elm would have a serrated edge.
But here, the crescent is all that's in whatever world we're looking at, and the rest is in the other world. (Jo's OP)
Great catch. This was also mentioned in the hangouts. He's apparently been very careful about that in sanctioned interpretations. Lee Moyer's Felurian from the 2013 squicky calendar depicts stars in the empty hollow of the crescent moon. Albino dragon also made three coins available, one of which (http://www.albinodragon.com/name-of-the-wind-elodins-question-coin/) is a door-post with a crescent moon behind it and stars in the hollow and Elodin's questionaround the circumference.
On the two little flaps are two more black and white bits—a white cameo dragon (draccus?) head, in a black circle (could it be Albino Dragon's albinio dragon?), and an eight spoked wheel. (Jo's OP)
The dragon is Albino Dragon's logo. (see http://www.albinodragon.com/) Shane did an albino draccus available as a magnet (see http://www.albinodragon.com/name-of-the-wind-albino-draccus-magnet-notw-draccus-mag/) or a print. It's shape and appearance is similar to the print that's been available at the Tinker's Packs for awhile now.
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected] Nat Taylor's image of the Sithe (http://www.cheapass.com/sites/default/files/PairsFaen4LG.jpg) depicts them more like what's described in the text: armor, bows, holly crowns, mounted. Tehlu&Pals are described as (mostly unseen) six winged seraphim. I don't think they're the same.
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
SPOILERS: Old Holly I'm kind of with Jo. "How Old Holly Came to Be," huh? These are bits from the introduction:
This story has a single plot, and it's only about seventeen hundred words. I wrote this story in a single day. But once I was done with this story on that first day, it was really, really finished. I changed about eight words and that's it. It's from an odd perspective, and it covers a vast scope of time.
It's brief, fast, and unedited. We know, I think to the day, when it was written, why, and what else he was working on at the time. It's billed as a Four Corners story and there are images plucked from setting. But it's vague. Even, at first glance(s), kind of inconsistent. And interpretation is kind of all over the place. Take this:
There were great black wolves, with mouths of fire. There were men who had been bent halfway into birds. They were both, and bad.
jumbles guesses that the wolves are draccus-like, presumable 'cause of the mouths of fire. And yet, the mouth filled with fire appears in NW:
The fire filled their mouths and they sang songs of power.
Which leads directly into the second sentence, which jumbles interprets as Tehlu&Pals. Incidentally, I agree with that. They're bad. I pretty much agree with that, too. But I worry that my feelings about the primary text push me to that agreement. That's just one bit, and it's a microcosm for what happenes when I read "Old Holly." Where do the pieces fit? What else am I missing? In a piece so hasty, is there anything to miss? Is it just tea leaves and chicken bones? There is one thing that stands out for me. The use of bent. Part of why I chose the quote abouve to mess with is because it appears there. In "Old Holly," bent is mostly bad, except, and only sometimes, when it serves the Lady's purposes. I'm running out of time, but bent to indicate wrong or even good-misused isn't new. It's from CS Lewis's Space Trilogy. Pat's a huge Lewis fan and has been since he could read. His blog post about love was more or less The Four Loves plus one. Anway, I guess I'm saying that that should be one of the places folks look for insight into the primary text. Bent.
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected] You have to know that we won't mind multiple posts. Indeed, we'd be delighted. Thank you for continuing the series. I'll be reading The Slow Regard of Silent Things when it comes out. Will we get an analyis of "The Lightning Tree" as well? When he's written or spoken about the supplementary works, he's talked about the pleasure derived from exploring territories unseen in the primary text. My sense is that while they'll fill out the world, they won't bear directly on The Kingkiller Chronicle. They will, however, tend to answer certain questions we've asked that, for lack of a better phrase, are the wrong ones. Jezdynamite @88/95 Great points. Iff there's a knack, those should be accounted for in some way. In the meantime, they represent an substantial counter-argument. [email protected] Congratulations.
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
'Sup, UK fans?
Gollancz, an imprint of the Orion Publishing Group, are delighted to announce the acquisition of UK and Commonwealth Rights to a new title from the award-nominated Sunday Times and New York Times bestselling author, Patrick Rothfuss. THE SLOW REGARD OF SILENT THINGS is a must-read novella set in Pat Rothfuss's extraordinary Kingkiller Universe.
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected] I'm only just learning about masks, so I'm not sure what to ask. I'd love to hear about the ideas you explored and the mechanics of construction. Did they affect each other? Like, did you choose the mask shape because it was strong(er)? Why two colors? Are you proud of your incredible butterflies?
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected]
Pledge $2,000 or more 1 backer All gone! Bast's Girlfriend - One lucky female will be prominently displayed with everyone's favorite bad boy. You'll also receive 1 Limited Edition deck, 1 Unlimited deck, and a signed art print of the card where you appear.
I'll do this in the order presented in the gallery. Box (Back): Kvothe on Tarbean rooftops Box (Front): bridge over the Omethi River, Achives visible Poker Chips "Wary" Coin Red Unlimited Edition card back Gaff Card: Willem Joker: Auri (based on Felicia Day) Joker: Elodin (based on Neil Gaiman) JD: Ambrose (based on Jim Butcher) QD: Devi KD: Kilvin AD: suit icon (Kilvin's Lamps) JC: Kvothe - Troupe/Waystone QC: Laurian KC: Arliden AC: suit icon (Arliden's Lute) JH: Simmon QH: Fela KH: Stanchion/Deoch AH: suit icon (Talent Pipes) JS: Bast and "girlfriend" QS: Denna KS: Kvothe AS: suit icon (Folly) Bookplate: Lorren
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
re:cards TheYllest put up an image gallery for folks still waiting. http://imgur.com/a/9nDzO
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected] I don't reckon you can see ten feet through three foot deep wastrels. [email protected] I also reckon ze's conflating an early, pre wmf report that Ambrose knowing Kvothe's name that first time in the Archives was an editing error with answers about Skarpi knowing Kvothe's name and Auri knowing where Kvothe lived, both of which have met with some variant of "Nobody poops in the books, either."
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
stevenhalter@13 That's probably where I should be. Perhaps it's pronounced nearly the same as "Quote."
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
[email protected] Selection of Rothfuss and Nick pronouncing Kvothe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_80uQPaDax8
Rothfuss Reread: Making a Mask for Patrick Rothfuss, Part 2
The 2013 Worldbuilders adjacent AMA http://www.reddit.com/r/Fantasy/comments/nk3oo/heya_everybody_im_pat_rothfuss_im_a_fantasy/c39pyhx
Q: How the heck do you pronounce it? A: In the audiobook it's pronounced "Cuh-thay" Pat: Ding Ding Ding! We have a winner!
Patrick Rothfuss: Talks at Google (3-28-2014) - sounds like cuh-thay https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLmI-gsRWLw#t=1595
Rothfuss Reread: Speculative Summary 21: The Thing in the Lackless Box
Pat read the prologue to the provisonally titled The Tale of Laniel Young Again at one of the Paul & Storm shows over the weekend. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5foB63K4j68#t=5983 The video is linked at 1:39 and the reading runs until about 1:49.
Rothfuss Reread: Speculative Summary 21: The Thing in the Lackless Box
A [email protected] Awesome. Thank you. Might be the kernel of truth in it? We do know that we'll see Kvothe and Bast meet and (paraphrase, will look for link) their early adventures.
Rothfuss Reread: Speculative Summary 21: The Thing in the Lackless Box
[email protected] Oddly enough we addressed one of the translations of that in the previous thread. A reader posting under the name germanfae had posted this:
Unfortunately the german translation is not that good. For example the song about Natalia Lackless: in german you can't figure out that the true identity of Arlides wife is hidden in the song, especially not we you read it loud :). The translation has its good sites and bad sites…
Here on the Reread, a talented German reader posting as Blue Elodin was active at the time, so I asked for hir opinion:
I would agree partially. Some clues are lost in the translation (as is the allusion to Kvothe's Ademic name in "Don't bring thunder"). In the case of Netalia Lackless, however, the tranlsator seems to have made a conscious effort to preserve the clue. The last lines are: "Ich nie im Leben // In meinem Streben // zu lieben locker lass". Where "locker lass" of course alludes to "Lockless". It's definitely not as good a clue as in English, and harder to catch as it alludes only to her family name, but once you know it, it's definitely there.
After reading that, germanfae agreed:
yes! thank you for your effort! i had to read the english song to understand the deeper message of it. I actually ask myself when reading the book if its right to say "locker lass" in this kontext ( stick to ones guns/ not giving up ) I think thats the clue for the ATTENTIV, german reader … :)
Some of these folks are working incredibly hard to retain the fidelity and polysemy of the original. What we think would be "utterly untranslatable " is being preserved in translation as best it can.
Rothfuss Reread: Speculative Summary 21: The Thing in the Lackless Box
[email protected]
But he also singled out his Dutch translator as exceptionally dedicated and skilled
That's great! She actually dropped in to comment on the Timeline:
I couldn't fathom why Book One wasn't a hit, and I grived the fact that Books Two and Three would never publish. But it seems to have been translated or rather rewritten by the original translator to fit fantasy readers age 12-19, and the result was rather disastrous. So I offered to re-translate Book One for re-publishing (in fact the deed is already done) solely with the purpose of being allowed to translate Book Two and Three. And I did close that deal, thank you very much. ::smug satisfaction::
She confirmed at least one error in NotW and provided some of the interpretations I used to translate the appendix to Der Name Des Windes. As for dedication, she read the reread!
This forum is as gemridden as the translators' forum, I can tell you that for sure!
As much as I wanna know which translation is sub par, I wouldn't wanna be the first one who posted, "Pat said so-and-so did bad work." There's a reason he doesn't want folks recording him. And there's a good chance he's expressed this opinion to the relevant parties already.
A New Novella from Patrick Rothfuss’ Kingkiller Chronicles Series Arrives November 2014!
[email protected] That's interpretive license on "Stubby's" part, not what he actually announced in the AMA or the public or online appearances where he's talked about it. The story's "centered on Auri," but there's been no confirmation of an origin story. I posted a longish bit about the how and why of these two novellas elsewhere.* The TL:DR is that DoS probably would have taken even longer without them. *http://www.reddit.com/r/Fantasy/comments/21m319/the_slow_regard_of_silent_things_by_patrick/cgef2n8

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