Ursula Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” Defies Genre

@18 Hi Javier, thank you! All of the Freedman quotes are from Conversations with Ursula K. Le Guin, which is a really nice collection of interviews from a range of persons. Many of the quotes from Le Guin above also came from here. 

@21 Richard, thank you! 

Ursula Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” Defies Genre

@6 I know--I didn't say the teenagers are the only ones who walk away, but, rather, that they learn of the child as teens.

Valerian is Supposed to Be About Love — Why is it So Unromantic?

@30 Thank you! And you're right, of course, that Valerian and Laureline both use this kind of language. However, the reason I referenced Laureline specifically is something I had to cut from the final version of the article, which is that there is a particular history of women being referred to with such diminutives as a sexist way to suggest societal rank--a well-known literary example of which is the patronising language of littleness the narrator's husband uses to (as it were) belittle her in "The Yellow Wallpaper." So, while both Laureline and Valerian use the same terminology towards each other, no doubt endearingly/teasingly, it still feels a bit different when Laureline is called that because it's hard not to invoke that history of (somewhat subtle) sexist language. It was what came to my mind as I read, certainly, though I don't believe Christin and Mezieres had any such explicit intentions, of course, given how progressively they depict Laureline overall and the history of her conception.

Valerian is Supposed to Be About Love — Why is it So Unromantic?

 'If anyone wants to start that tired old argument of ‘it’s because the film is based on a 50-year-old comic that contains ideas about love and sex that would be outdated now’…. don’t.'

While I agree with a lot of what this article says about the film (I don't understand the casting at all!), I don't agree with this assessment of the comics. I'm not sure if you've read them, but they aren't stereotypical '50-year-old' texts with simplistic assumptions about gender. Laureline is actually, as some others have said above, fairly impressive when it comes to gender roles in comics of the time and was actually directly created as a "feminist" figure to counteract the crass images of women that tended to dominate the scene prior to the series. I wrote a piece about that recently, which looked at Laureline's surprisingly revolutionary but undersung place in this history of comics' depictions of women: 
https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/07/science-fictions-under-appreciated-feminist-icon/532608/

Valerian is an odder case. His character was actually crafted to intentionally be bland at first, and Laureline quickly becomes, despite the series' title, arguably the bigger protagonist. While none of this makes up for the utter lack of charisma on the screen, I just wanted to add some back-ground to this.

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