Tor.com content by

Liesa Mignogna

Dungeons & Dragons and the Art of Taking Risks

In this ongoing series, we ask SF/F authors to describe a specialty in their lives that has nothing (or very little) to do with writing. Join us as we discover what draws authors to their various hobbies, how they fit into their daily lives, and how and they inform the author’s literary identity!

I played my first D&D game at age 37. Unlike most of the people I know who are deep into the world of role-playing games, I’d never wandered into the dungeon as a kid. I’d never even been invited! A colleague of mine at the children’s book publisher where I work was starting up a group with her husband, and asked me if I was interested. My own husband James and I had a nearly one-year-old son, which had severely limited our ability to socialize, and this was the perfect opportunity to hang out with friends at our house, no babysitter required. Our campaign formed together of several other coworkers and significant others and friends—a children’s publishing D&D group!

A few had played many times before, while myself and one other member were newbies. It was explained to me how the game was basically a combination of creative choices and editorial framework with dice rolls and interactive/live storytelling. A fascinating blend of acting and writing.

[Enter “Jane”, an Elven Cleric and reformed assassin.]