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Kathryn Allan

Fiction and Excerpts [1]
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Fiction and Excerpts [1]

Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure (Excerpt)

|| In science fiction, technology often modifies, supports, and attempts to "make normal" the disabled body. In Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure, twelve international scholars—with backgrounds in disability studies, English and world literature, classics, and history—discuss the representation of dis/ability, medical "cures," technology, and the body in science fiction. Bringing together the fields of disability studies and science fiction, this book explores the ways dis/abled bodies use prosthetics to challenge common ideas about ability and human being, as well as proposes new understandings of what "technology as cure" means for people with disabilities in a (post)human future.

Neither Hero nor Anti-hero: Misha’s Red Spider White Web

The first science fiction books that I purposefully picked up and read (at the age of 25—I’m a late bloomer) fell into two camps: cyberpunk and feminist SF. I loved the grittiness and the expositions on technology of cyberpunk; I was invigorated by the politics and thoughtful critiques of gender, race, sexuality, and class in feminist SF.

I began looking for stories that exemplified the best of both worlds, and, indeed, I found many, but nothing prepared me for the ground-shifting shock of Misha’s Red Spider White Web (1990). It’s been nearly eight years since I first read the boundary-crossing novel and I can vividly remember the feeling of being utterly shattered by Misha’s frenetic writing and her desperate, brilliant characters surviving a violent, brutal future world (but so close to our own that there is no comfort to be found when putting the book down).Gideon Smith amazon buy link

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Series: That Was Awesome! Writers on Writing

Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure (Excerpt)

In science fiction, technology often modifies, supports, and attempts to “make normal” the disabled body. In Disability in Science Fiction: Representations of Technology as Cure, twelve international scholars—with backgrounds in disability studies, English and world literature, classics, and history—discuss the representation of dis/ability, medical “cures,” technology, and the body in science fiction. Bringing together the fields of disability studies and science fiction, this book explores the ways dis/abled bodies use prosthetics to challenge common ideas about ability and human being, as well as proposes new understandings of what “technology as cure” means for people with disabilities in a (post)human future.

The collection is edited by Dr. Katharyn Allan, an independent scholar of science fiction and disability studies and author of the blog Bleeding Chrome. Below, we are pleased to share an excerpt from Dr. Allan’s introduction to Disability in Science Fiction.

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