God Unlikely to Return for Good Omens’ Second Season (UPDATE)

Neither God nor the Devil will be making a return appearance for the second season of Good Omens—at least not as we previously knew them. Frances McDormand and Benedict Cumberbatch are not among the actors set to appear in Amazon’s sequel series, though many familiar faces will be back, including Derek Jacobi (still playing Metatron), Mark Gatiss, Miranda Richardson, and Jon Hamm.

A handful of new cast members have also joined the series, though most of their roles remain a celestial mystery.

Michael McKean, Steve Pemberton, Reece Shearsmith, Niamh Walsh, Maggie Service, Nina Sosanya, Doon Mackichan, and Gloria Obianyo are all returning, though previous reports have noted that some actors will be playing new roles—making it even more difficult to speculate as to who’s doing what. Mackichan and Obianyo are returning to their roles as angels Michael and Uriel, though.

The new cast includes Liz Carr (the angel Saraqael), Quelin Sepulveda (the angel Muriel), and Shelley Conn (a character from hell)—and a handful of actors whose roles are yet to be announced: Dame Siân Phillips (David Lynch’s Dune), Tim Downie (Outlander), Pete Firman (The Magicians), Andi Osho (The Sandman), and Alex Norton (Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest).

Everyone’s being quite tight-lipped as to what the second season is about, beyond the briefest summary, which Deadline explains thusly: “Having been on Earth since The Beginning, and with the Apocalypse thwarted, Aziraphale and Crowley are getting back to easy living amongst mortals in London’s Soho when an unexpected messenger presents a surprising mystery.”

Good Omens is currently in production in Scotland, with co-author Neil Gaiman serving as co-showrunner with Douglas Mackinnon. The upcoming season will have four bonus “minisodes,” and cast and crew have been sharing a few behind-the-scenes peeks. No release date has been announced.

UPDATE: It turns out that Deadline misreported, as according to Neil Gaiman, God’s involvement might still be relevant:

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