ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination Releases Free Climate Change Anthology

Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination has been looking at how science fiction can help communicate scientific ideas to the wider public, producing its own anthologies of shorter fiction for the last couple of years.

Its latest is called Everything Change Volume III, an anthology about climate fiction, drawn from entries in a contest that it ran last year. The book is now out, and best of all, it’s free.

The volume is the most recent offering from the program—the last one arrived back in March, Cities of Light, a book about solar power including stories from Paolo Bacigalupi, S.B. Divya, Deji Bryce Olukotun, and Andrew Dana Hudson, along with a number of nonfiction essays.

Everything Change is the third entry in the center’s series of climate change anthologies: the first came in 2016, and the second arrived in 2018. This year’s volume contains stories from a variety of authors, and illustrations from João Queiroz. The stories included in the book range “from science fiction and fabulism to literary fiction, weird fiction, and action-thriller.”

Here’s the table of contents:

  • “Invasive Species,” by Amanda Baldeneaux
  • “The God of the Sea,” by Barakat Akinsiku
  • “Plasticized,” by Kathryn E. Hill.
  • “The Drifter,” by J.R. Burgmann
  • “The Lullaby-Dirge,” by Mason Carr
  • “Driftless,” by Scott Dorsch
  • “Galansiyang,” by Sigrid Marianne Gayangos
  • “Those They Left Behind,” by Jules Hogan
  • “Redline,” by Anya Ow
  • “Field Notes,” by Natasha Seymour

The book is available in a variety of digital formats — ePub, HTML, Kindle, Apple Books, and PDF.

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