New Doctor Who Short Story Confirms How the Thirteenth Doctor Survived Her Fall

While it doesn’t super duper matter, now that Jodie Whittaker’s Thirteenth Doctor is two seasons into her tenure, there’s always been a lingering question from her premiere episode “The Woman Who Fell to Earth“: How did she survive that fall from the TARDIS?

Current showrunner Chris Chibnall has shared a short story on the Doctor Who site that reveals the specifics of the Doctor’s post-regeneration survival. The story “Things She Thought While Falling” reads like a flavor document meant to help Whittaker internalize the then-new Doctor’s voice:

That’s interesting, she thought. I seem to be an optimist. With a hint of enthusiasm. And what’s that warm feeling in my stomach? Ah, I’m kind! Brilliant.

So how did the Thirteenth Doctor survive becoming a splattercake after falling hundreds of feet onto a train? Regeneration magic. Well-established regeneration magic, that is. We’ve seen before that a new-ish Doctor can still pull off some radical healing abilities with leftover “regeneration energy,” the most notable instance being David Tennant’s Doctor growing an entirely new hand.

It’s a fightin’ hand!” We totally forgot about that. Oh, David Tennant. You’re the hero we needed AND deserved.

(Fun fact! The severed hand was later collected and used to grow a new David Tennant, which then stayed behind in a parallel dimension, meaning he could feasibly return at any moment because Doctor Who is so weird.)

Anyway.

Story time is this way.

citation

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