How Supergirl’s Alex Danvers Made a Queer Teen Realize She’s Not Alone

Since Supergirl premiered last year, the character of Alex Danvers has been a role model for young women: badass spy and scientist, loving and supportive sister to Supergirl/Kara Danvers, an integral part of the show’s emotional core. This season, when Alex realized that she was queer and came out to her family, the character has become even more layered, showing even more viewers that they are represented in media.

More than that, Supergirl‘s thoughtful and sensitive arc about Alex coming to terms with her identity helped save a queer teen’s life. Mary Swangin, an employee at an Indiana comic book store, recently shared a touching story about a teenager who came to the store to find more comics with LGBTQ characters–a young woman who had tried to take her own life but who “didn’t want to die anymore” after seeing Alex “be amazing and be queer.”

Here’s Swangin’s tweet thread in full; it’s worth reading all the way through, though you’ll likely be tearing up by the end.

Supergirl Alex Danvers Sanvers LGBTQ representation Twitter

Supergirl Alex Danvers Sanvers LGBTQ representation Twitter

Supergirl Alex Danvers Sanvers LGBTQ representation Twitter

The Supergirl writers responded:

And then Chyler Leigh, who has been great about engaging with fans on Twitter, chimed in:

I know that I’ve been a tad critical of the series for not explicitly calling Alex bisexual (seeing as how she had previously dated men), but I realize that that’s more about my desire to see specifically bi visibility on television. Stories like this one show that it’s more important for younger people who are struggling with their identity to see someone who is simply queer. Anyway, as this touching Tumblr post from a bi woman who’s roughly Alex’s age and married to a man demonstrates, you can still read it that way. Bravo to the Supergirl writers and cast, especially Leigh, for putting this story on television.

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