Behold the Cover to Kameron Hurley’s Geek Feminist Revolution

Respect. That’s what I feel when I read Kameron Hurley’s essays. She writes with passion, conviction, and heart-wrenching honesty. And that’s why, when The Geek Feminist Revolution was offered to me, I fought hard to acquire it. Because as much as her essays are tied to the ongoing conversation within the speculative fiction community about the evolution of genre, Hurley writes in a way that resonates with people who have no interest in SF/F. Her essays are universal. And this book, collecting dozens of entries from her blog (including “We Have Always Fought,” which won the Hugo Award), as well as a dozen more written specifically for this collection, will, I believe, earn the respect of a great many more people with its wit and its gravitas, its rage and its joy, its tactical profanity and its eloquence.

The Geek Feminist Revolution arrives May 31, 2016 from Tor Books and can be pre-ordered at this link. From the catalog copy:

A powerful collection of essays on feminism, geek culture, and a writer’s journey, from one of the most important new voices in genre.

The Geek Feminist Revolution is a collection of essays by double Hugo Award-winning essayist and fantasy novelist Kameron Hurley.

The book collects dozens of Hurley’s essays on feminism, geek culture, and her experiences and insights as a genre writer, including “We Have Always Fought,” which won the 2014 Hugo for Best Related Work. The Geek Feminist Revolution will also feature several entirely new essays written specifically for this volume.

Unapologetically outspoken, Hurley has contributed essays to The Atlantic, Locus, Tor.com, and elsewhere on the rise of women in genre, her passion for SF/F, and the diversification of publishing.

And the cover, designed by Jamie Stafford-Hill:

The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley cover

 

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