Angry Robot Books Acquires Peter Tieryas’ United States of Japan

Character artist and Bald New World author Peter Tieryas has sold a new novel, United States of Japan, to Angry Robot Books. As the spiritual successor to Philip K. Dick’s Hugo-winning The Man in the High Castle (which is being adapted by Amazon Studios), United States of Japan will take place in the same alternate-history world—with Japanese robots! The deal by agent Judy Hansen of Hansen Literary Agency includes translation, audio, and ebook rights.

Here’s what we know about the book so far:

Due for release in early 2016, United States of Japan is hailed as the spiritual sequel to Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, and is set in a gripping alternate history where the Japanese empire rules over America with huge robots. Is resistance possible in the form of subversive video games?

Angry Robot’s Consulting Editor Phil Jourdan said:

We are thrilled to be able to bring Peter Tieryas onboard the Angry Robot mothership. I think United States of Japan is going to please a lot of smart readers, and not just the ones who grew up on Philip K. Dick novels.

Tieryas explained some of the inspiration behind the book:

When I began United States of Japan, researching the events that took place in Asia during WWII, I couldn’t get the haunting images out of my head. These were stories that people around me growing up had experienced, passing it down through the generations. United States of Japan was a chance to tell their story in a completely different context, showing how people have endured, struggled, and triumphed under adverse circumstances. I’m very excited that a book about huge Japanese robots dominating the world is coming out from the best and biggest publisher of Angry Robots.

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