Is Gillian Anderson’s Debut Sci-Fi Novel Basically Scully X-Files Fic?

Back in January, we discovered that Gillian Anderson was writing a science fiction novel called A Vision of Fire, which will be published in October. Now, we know more about what protagonist Caitlin O’Hara—who we’re envisioning as Dana Scully, only better with kids—is actually in for in the first book of “The EarthEnd Saga.”

Jezebel noticed the official summary, which describes O’Hara as a child psychologist who’s also a single mom with a lackluster dating life (so, no pseudo-Mulder for her?) who has to unlock the secrets of several mystical phenomena in order to avert nuclear war. Wait, what?

O’Hara is (surprise, surprise) reasonably skeptical when confronted with a child who begins speaking in tongues and having violent visions. After all, little Maanik’s father, the Indian ambassador to the United Nations, has just narrowly survived an assassination attempt. Most likely this kid is just acting out.

But then other children around the globe start acting strangely—drowning on dry land and setting themselves on fire. Not to mention that the New York subway rats and ordinary house pets are in on the bad energy, and you’re looking at a mystical worldwide conspiracy of The Da Vinci Code proportions.

On top of all that—and here’s where the X-Files parallels peter out but maybe only because of budget constraints—the world is on the brink of nuclear war, with the ambassador’s assassination attempt setting the stage for war between India and Pakistan.

We’re just hoping that Caitlin O’Hara shares Dana Scully’s predilection for uttering “Oh my god” at every weird bit of phenomena and nuclear missile scare. And also that at some point a guy named, we dunno, “Spulder” calls her to offer a crazy theory as to why this is all happening:

citation

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