Jonathan Rhys Meyers’ Dracula Could Make Dashing Vampires Cool Again

The first images for NBC’s sexy TV reboot of Dracula have emerged, along with a new synopsis and I think (against conventional wisdom) that it might not (pun intended) suck. Here’s why.

You might have to be a Jonathan Rhys Meyers apologist like me to really understand, but here goes: the idea of doing a sexy Dracula isn’t in opposistion one bit to what has made for great adaptations of Dracula in the past. Yes, I know many horror purists might prefer the 1922 Nosferatu, but for me, it’s all about the 1931 Bela Lugosi Dracula. Back in 2011, I wrote a piece here at Tor.com called “Let the Snazzy One In,” outlining why the sexiness of Lugosi is what makes the film work.

Look, we want Dracula to be dashing and sexy. Not twee sexy, or teenage sexy, but actually assertive and badass sexy. Rhys Meyers has the badass/sexy angle thing coming out of his ears, so I feel like there’s a big check mark right there. The synopsis reveals the show is set in the Victorian era, making the set-up similar to the 1931 film. Plus, characters like Mina (Jessica De Gouw) and Renfield (Nonso Anozie) are included among the cast. In addition, one of the producers—Gareth Neame—previously worked on Downton Abbey, making me think the new Dracula will might be a nice cocktail of Victorian soap opera nostalgia mixed with classic Dracula sexiness.

My primary hope is that the writers take a page from the original Dark Shadows TV show and give this Dracula real-world desires and problems. Could Jonathan Rhys Meyers emerge as a contemporary mash-up of Bela Lugosi’s Count Dracula and Jonathan Frid’s Barnabas Collins? Hopefully!

If they do it right, this could be the real return to glory for actually sexy vampires!

Update: Now with trailer!


Ryan Britt is a longtime contributor to Tor.com and you can’t see his reflection.

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