Thu
Jul 25 2013 9:00am

Dangerous Women: “Virgins” (Excerpt)

Diana Gabaldon

Dangerous Women We are very excited to be able to preview Dangerous Women, a new anthology edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois, and featuring 21 new stories from some of the biggest authors in the science fiction/fantasy field. The anthology is available on December 3rd from Tor Books!

Every morning until July 30th, we’ll be previewing excerpts from the stories, returning you to the world of Jim Butcher’s Harry Dresden, Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series, Brandon Sanderson’s cosmere, and even Westeros itself. Keep an eye on the Dangerous Women index to keep track of them all.

“Virgins” by Diana Gabaldon is a prequel story to her Outlander series, and features Jamie Fraser, who is forced out of his Scottish home and set to wandering in the world.

 

“VIRGINS”

October, 1740
Near Bordeaux, France

Ian Murray knew from the moment he saw his best friend’s face that something terrible had happened. The fact that he was seeing Jamie Fraser’s face at all was evidence enough of that, never mind the look of the man.

Jamie was standing by the armorer’s wagon, his arms full of the bits and pieces Armand had just given him, white as milk and swaying back and forth like a reed on Loch Awe. Ian reached him in three paces and took him by the arm before he could fall over.

“Ian.” Jamie looked so relieved at seeing him that Ian thought he might break into tears. “God, Ian.”

Ian seized Jamie in embrace, and felt him stiffen and draw in his breath at the same instant he felt the bandages beneath Jamie’s shirt.

“Jesus!” he began, startled, but then coughed and said, “Jesus, man, it’s good to see ye.” He patted Jamie’s back gently and let go. “Ye’ll need a bit to eat, aye? Come on, then.”

Plainly they couldn’t talk now, but he gave Jamie a quick private nod, took half the equipment from him, and then led him to the fire, to be introduced to the others.

Jamie’d picked a good time of day to turn up, Ian thought. Everyone was tired, but happy to sit down, looking forward to their supper and the daily ration of whatever was going in the way of drink. Ready for the possibilities a new fish offered for entertainment, but without the energy to include the more physical sorts of entertainment.

“That’s Big Georges over there,” Ian said, dropping Jamie’s gear and gesturing toward the far side of the fire. “Next to him, the wee fellow wi’ the warts is Juanito; doesna speak much French and nay English at all.”

“Do any of them speak English?” Jamie likewise dropped his gear, and sat heavily on his bedroll, tucking his kilt absently down between his knees. His eyes flicked round the circle, and he nodded, half-smiling in a shy sort of way.

“I do.” The captain leaned past the man next to him, extending a hand to Jamie. “I’m le capitaine—Richard D’Eglise. You’ll call me Captain. You look big enough to be useful—your friend says your name is Fraser?”

“Jamie Fraser, aye.” Ian was pleased to see that Jamie knew to meet the captain’s eye square, and had summoned the strength to return the handshake with due force.

“Know what to do with a sword?”

“I do. And a bow, forbye.” Jamie glanced at the unstrung bow by his feet, and the short-handled ax beside it. “Havena had much to do wi’ an ax before, save chopping wood.”

“That’s good,” one of the other men put in, in French. “That’s what you’ll use it for.” Several of the others laughed, indicating that they at least understood English, whether they chose to speak it or not.

“Did I join a troop of soldiers, then, or charcoal-burners?” Jamie asked, raising one brow. He said that in French—very good French, with a faint Parisian accent—and a number of eyes widened. Ian bent his head to hide a smile, in spite of his anxiety. The wean might be about to fall face-first into the fire, but nobody—save maybe Ian—was going to know it, if it killed him.

Ian did know it, though, and kept a covert eye on Jamie, pushing bread into his hand so the others wouldn’t see it shake, sitting close enough to catch him if he should in fact pass out. The light was fading into gray now, and the clouds hung low and soft, pink-bellied. Going to rain, likely, by the morning. He saw Jamie close his eyes just for an instant, saw his throat move as he swallowed, and felt the trembling of Jamie’s thigh near his own.

What the devil’s happened? he thought in anguish. Why are ye here?

It wasn’t until everyone had settled for the night that Ian got an answer.

“I’ll lay out your gear,” he whispered to Jamie, rising. “You stay by the fire that wee bit longer—rest a bit, aye?” The firelight cast a ruddy glow on Jamie’s face, but he thought his friend was likely still white as a sheet; he hadn’t eaten much.

Coming back, he saw the dark spots on the back of Jamie’s shirt, blotches where fresh blood had seeped through the bandages. The sight filled him with fury as well as fear. He’d seen such things; the wean had been flogged. Badly, and recently. Who? How?

“Come on, then,” he said roughly, and, bending, got an arm under Jamie’s and got him to his feet and away from the fire and the other men. He was alarmed to feel the clamminess of Jamie’s hand and hear his shallow breath.

“What?” he demanded, the moment they were out of earshot. “What happened?”

Jamie sat down abruptly.

“I thought one joined a band of mercenaries because they didna ask ye questions.”

 

“Virgins” © Diana Gabaldon


Keep an eye on the Dangerous Women index to keep track of all our excerpts and reviews!

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10 comments
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
1. Marilyn Maxwell Strout
Typical, tantalizing Gabaldon, does it again! Can't wait to see how this turns out!
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
2. Josephine Reynolds
What a taster, want to know what happens next!
Wolf Lahti
3. wolflahti
That second paragraph: armorer, arms, Armand, arm

Does the woman listen to anything she writes?
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
4. RobinM
I can't wait to read the rest. I just have to keep an eye out for it at the library.
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
5. Rosie Blake
Fantastic can not wait to read whole story I love these anthologys .
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
6. SusanM
...armorer, arms, Armand, arm... It's called alliteration.
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
7. Christiane
I'm so looking forward to reading about Jamie and Ian, mercenaries in my country !! Well, december is not so far... I'm looking forward to reading Sam Sykes' novella (?) too !
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
8. Lilith
Susan, it's actually assonance. Alliteration applies to consonants; assonance, to vowels. While this sequence technically does use assonance, that's not what's so grating. The entire syllable, "arm," is repeated just enough to make me notice it, yet not enough to produce a positive effect on the flow of the prose. It adds no poetic element, and subtle -- what assonance or alliteration should be -- is the last thing it is. I'm interested in the plot, but almost embarrassed for the author due to the lackluster quality of her prose.
Marilyn Maxwell Strout
9. Jaxson
wolflahti, Lilith: How many books have you written? How large is your fan base? How wealthy are you because of your writing? Gabaldon has a HUGE fan base and has become quite wealthy because of, or in spite of, her writing style. For either of you to complain about 4 words in an 800 word excerpt is rather funny.
Eliizabeth Blye
11. Annblye
Never been here before but just a taste from Diana again makes me excited! Have played heck feeding my reading addiction! Hurry, please.

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