Holy Rewatch Batman! “Black Widow Strikes Again” / “Caught in the Spider’s Den”

“Black Widow Strikes Again” / “Caught in the Spider’s Den”
Written by Robert Mintz
Directed by Oscar Rudolph
Season 2, Episodes 55 and 56
Production code 9753
Original air dates: March 15 and 16, 1967

The Bat-signal: The Black Widow arrives at a bank, driven there in the sidecar of a motorcycle by one of her henchmen, who also helps her out and hands her her coat and bag. On the pretense of opening a savings account, she activates a Cerebrum Short-Circuiter, which puts the bank manager under her control, and she tells him to give her $30,000.

The manager goes to Gordon, who calls Batman just as Harriet is showing off her new black pants to Bruce and Dick—she apparently wants to become “mod.” (She wanted a miniskirt, but the sales clerk said she didn’t have the face for it. Charming sales clerk, that…) Our heroes arrive at GCPD, where Gordon reads the file on the Black Widow, and Batman confirms the mind control that was used on the bank manager.

[Another groovy day in Gotham City…….]

Series: Holy Rewatch Batman!

This Week in the Arrowverse: Ninjas Are Real

What’s this? A Flash that’s having more fun than not? An Arrow who’s maybe accepting some of his mistakes? And a team of Legends who’ve all got something useful to do? This week’s Arrowverse shows were solid across the board, with a lot of plot movement and a lot of character development. And some ninjas, for good measure. It seems we’ve left all that season-opener baggage behind and are moving into new territory—with new teammates, new metahumans, and new perspectives on established relationships.

Spoilers for all three shows below!

[Read more]

Authors, Actors, and Fans Participate in #HoldOnToTheLight to Raise Awareness For Mental Illness

Struggling with mental illness is a day-to-day fight that taxes countless people all over the world. And while it is common, the stigma around discussing mental illness, in its varied forms, remains. That’s why authors, actors, and celebrities are coming forward to share their experiences at part of the #HoldOnToTheLight campaign. Because at its best, fandom takes care of each other.

Need some words of wisdom?

[Read more]

The Burning Light

Disgraced government operative Colonel Chu is exiled to the flooded relic of New York City. Something called the Light has hit the streets like an epidemic, leavings its users strung out and disconnected from the mind-network humanity relies on. Chu has lost everything she cares about to the Light. She’ll end the threat or die trying.

A former corporate pilot who controlled a thousand ships with her mind, Zola looks like just another Light-junkie living hand to mouth on the edge of society. She’s special though. As much as she needs the Light, the Light needs her too. But, Chu is getting close and Zola can’t hide forever.

Available November 1st from Tor.com Publishing, The Burning Light is a thrilling and all-too believable science fiction novella from Bradley P. Beaulieu and Rob Ziegler, the authors of Twelve Kings in Sharakhai and Seed.

[Read an Excerpt]

New Arrival Trailer Lands on Common Ground

The latest (and perhaps last?) trailer for Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival takes a very different tack from the ones that came before: Most of it is dedicated to one of those feel-good videos of strangers meeting and discovering some shared ground or inexplicable connection. But it’s actually a sly bit of marketing on Paramount Pictures’ part, because over the course of a minute you watch pairs of strangers who don’t speak the same language solve the puzzle of what thing they have in common—a theme undoubtedly mirrored in Arrival.

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Extreme Makeover Sweepstakes!

We want to send you a galley copy of Dan Wells’s Extreme Makeover, available November 15th from Tor Books!

Lyle Fontanelle is the chief scientist for NewYew, a health and beauty company experimenting with a new, anti-aging hand lotion. As more and more anomalies crop up in testing, Lyle realizes that the lotion’s formula has somehow gone horribly wrong. It is actively overwriting the DNA of anyone who uses it, turning them into physical clones of someone else. Lyle wants to destroy the formula, but NewYew thinks it might be the greatest beauty product ever designed–and the world’s governments think it’s the greatest weapon.

New York Times bestselling author Dan Wells brings us a gripping corporate satire about a health and beauty company that could destroy the world in Extreme Makeover.

Comment in the post to enter!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. A purchase does not improve your chances of winning. Sweepstakes open to legal residents of 50 United States and D.C., and Canada (excluding Quebec). To enter, comment on this post beginning at 12:30 PM Eastern Time (ET) on October 28th. Sweepstakes ends at 12:00 PM ET on November 1st. Void outside the United States and Canada and where prohibited by law. Please see full details and official rules here. Sponsor: Tor.com, 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010.

Celebrate Christmas a Little Early with This Stranger Things/Charlie Brown Mashup!

WARNING: This post contains Christmas. We know, we know, it’s at least a month early for jingling bells and tannenbaums, but this brilliant Stranger Things/A Charlie Brown Christmas mash-up would not be ignored. The kids’ cadences are perfect, the use of the Stranger Things theme music is perfect, the update on the iconic Peanuts dance is perfect… we’re probably watching this every day in December.

The story picks up shortly after the end of Stranger Things (so beware of potential spoilers!), and finds poor confused Will Byers wondering why he can’t seem to get into the holiday spirit. Could it be that his trip to the Upside Down has permanently damaged him? Click through to find out!

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Get the eBook of Paul Cornell’s Witches of Lychford for Just 99 Cents — Today Only!

Just in time for Halloween, the ebook of Paul Cornell’s haunting Witches of Lychford is now available for 99¢ for a limited time!

The villagers in the sleepy hamlet of Lychford are divided. A supermarket wants to build a major branch on their border. Some welcome the employment opportunities, while some object to the modernization of the local environment.

Judith Mawson (local crank) knows the truth—that Lychford lies on the boundary between two worlds, and that the destruction of the border will open wide the gateways to malevolent beings beyond imagination.

But if she is to have her voice heard, she’s going to need the assistance of some unlikely allies…

Get your 99¢ ebook today at the following links, or from your favorite retailer: Nook | Kindle | iBooks

If you’re in the UK, you can grab a copy for 99p at Amazon UK!

You can also pre-order Cornell’s upcoming sequel, The Lost Child of Lychford, available Tuesday, November 1st from Tor.com Publishing!

Farsickness, Homesickness in The Found and the Lost by Ursula K. Le Guin

It’s a good time to be an Ursula K. Le Guin fan, and an excellent time to become a convert. Among the numerous releases and rereleases slated for the next year, Saga Press has collected Le Guin’s short fiction into two stunning hardcover editions, released in October. The first, The Found and the Lost (novellas), I’ll attempt to tackle here. The second, The Unreal and the Real (short stories), I’ll explore later this year. In November the two collections will be released yet again, this time as a boxset (just in time, presumably, for the Holidays). But whether you buy these collections separately or together, you’re in for a treat. A graceful, intrepid, and sometimes devastating treat.

The Found and the Lost captures Le Guin at her most formidable, welcoming readers home to places they’ve never visited, and making the familiar stranger and stranger still. If you caught her Orsinia collection earlier this fall, these stories will feel right at home nestled within her pseudo-historical Europe. Revolution, community, and comings-of-age map as well onto alien planets as they do onto 19th century bildungsroman. And of course, glimpses into both the Earthsea Archipelago and the travels of the Ekumen will round out the collection for any long-time fans.

[More, including the Table of Contents]

Oh Come On, the Fright Night Remake Isn’t That Bad…

Fright Night is a great movie. Vampires, awesome actors, bloody deaths, cool special effects a splash of romance, what’s not to love? Oh, I should clarify, I’m talking about the 2011 remake, not the 1985 original. I could take or leave the original version but I break out my copy of the remake several times a year. To take it one step further, I submit that the remake is better than the original. Wait, wait, wait, don’t storm off yet. Hear me out.

Spoilers ahoy…

[“The whole house looks like that show Dark Shadows.”]

Adorable Gadget Cosplay Honors Our Favorite Mechanic!

We here at Tor.com are of the opinion that Gadget Hackwrench doesn’t get enough attention. Come on: cool lady mouse mechanic, no romantic partners, no kids, just a mind-bogglingly high IQ, a fondness for invention, and a deep love for her friends. Plus she was based on Jordan from Real Genius, and we’re just going to go ahead an assume that she inspired Kaylee Frye.

Cosplay in America shared this photo of Mae Blake, who is doing her part to make sure Gadget gets the recognition she deserves.

[via Facebook!]

A Guide to Assassin’s Creed for Non-Gamers

The latest trailer for the upcoming Assassin’s Creed movie, starring Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, and Jeremy Irons, hit last week. I’ve been playing the games, in order, since 2013 and from what we’ve seen of the film so far, it looks to be a fun, pretty faithful adaptation. There’s historical locations, conspiracies, ancestral DNA-based virtual reality systems, hoodies, stabbing, jumping off tall buildings. That’s pretty much the Assassin’s Creed recipe.

But for a game best known for its signature hoodies, jumping, and stabbing, there’s a surprising amount of backstory to the Assassin’s Creed games—and a surprising amount of that backstory seems to feature prominently in the movie. So, with a wide-band spoiler warning firmly in place, I’m going to take you through a quick tour of what I think we’re being shown in the trailers and through the principle tenets of the series. Welcome, newcomers! Find a nice cathedral to climb, put your best hoodie on, take a minute to reflect on the fact that Ezio was the best leading character ever, and get ready to take a leap of faith into the middle of Assassin’s Creed

[A handy guide to the world of Assassin’s Creed…]

The Weaver

Eliana is a model citizen of the island, a weaver in the prestigious House of Webs. She also harbors a dangerous secret—she can dream, an ability forbidden by the island’s elusive council of elders. No one talks about the dreamers, the undesirables ostracized from society.

But the web of protection Eliana has woven around herself begins to unravel when a young girl is found lying unconscious in a pool of blood on the stones outside the house. Robbed of speech by her attackers, the only clue to her identity is one word tattooed in invisible ink across her palm: Eliana. Why does this mysterious girl bear her name? What links her to the weaver—and could she hold Eliana’s fate in her hand?

As Eliana finds herself growing closer to this injured girl she is bound to in ways she doesn’t understand, the enchanting lies of the island begin to crumble, revealing a deep and ancient corruption. Joining a band of brave rebels determined to expose the island’s dark secrets, Eliana becomes a target of ruthless forces determined to destroy her. To save herself and those she loves, she must call on the power within her she thought was her greatest weakness: her dreams.

Emmi Itäranta, author of the critically acclaimed Memory of Water, returns with The Weaver—available November 1st from Harper Voyager.

[Read an Excerpt]