Mon
Jun 30 2014 10:00am

A Read of The Dark Tower: Constant Reader Tackles The Dark Tower, The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey, Chapter 1

Stephen King The Dark Tower

“There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met
To view the last of me, a living frame
For one more picture! In a sheet of flame
I saw them and I knew them all.”

—Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”

Welcome to A Read of the Dark Tower series. Join me each week as I, Constant Reader, tackle the magnum opus of Stephen King’s career for the first time. If you want to discuss in general terms or talk about these or preceding sections, join me by commenting here.

Last week, we left Roland, Susannah, and Oy riding off into the sunset with no-longer-Stuttering Bill while Mordred lagged behind and ate something he shouldn’t have. The corpse of Dandelo or Lippy, perhaps?

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 1

In the last days of their travels, between where Bill the Robot dropped them off for their last walk to the Tower, Susannah gets weepy because she realizes her time in Mid-World—and End-World—is almost over.

What Constant Reader Learns: I think I see where this is going. Drawing. Erasers. Doors. Awfully convenient, but rather that than Susannah gets eaten by a giant underground worm.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 2

Bill had dropped them off at a Quonset hut with a sign reading: FEDERAL OUTPOST 19, TOWER WATCH. TRAVEL BEYOND THIS POINT IS FORBIDDEN! They’ve been listening to music as they rode, and Bill told Susannah about the “Beetles,” as she thought of them. Patrick seems to read her mind and writes, “Beatles, not Beetles.”

What Constant Reader Learns: I love the image of them all riding in the cab of Stuttering Bill’s snow plow listening to oldies rock music on “ceedees.” Roland sang along with “Hey Jude,” but with different lyrics.

Mind-reading is a useful skill.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 3

At “the Federal,” there is a common room whose walls are covered with what Susannah guesses are at least three-hundred TV monitors. They had once, Bill said, shown satellite feeds from around the earth. Bill estimates they are about a hundred miles (120 wheels) from the Tower itself, and offers them a vehicle, but after some consideration Roland turns him down. “Part of me thinks tomorrowday’s too soon (to get to the Tower),” he tells him. “That part of me thinks we should go the rest of the way on foot…I’m not ready to be there yet. Not quite ready. I need a little more time to prepare my mind and my heart. Mayhap even my soul.”

They do, however, take a cart that Bill offers to motorize. Roland figures they can make the Tower in five or six days, and he wants to arrive around sunset.

What Constant Reader Learns: Until recently, Bill told them, one of the TV screens had shown the Dark Tower, but the picture disappeared about the time the Red King arrived. “I don’t think the Red King liked being on television, especially if he knew company might be coming,” Bill says.

Susannah has decided that, unlike what Roland told them before, they have not outrun ka, but that ka extends everywhere and mayhap is embodied by the Tower itself. She also doesn’t think Patrick or Oy are meant to reach the Tower. I hope Oy and Patrick stop short of the Tower and don’t get killed, although I’ve never thought Oy would make it. Guess we’ll see soon enough.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 4

After lunching with Bill, they say their goodbyes. Bill promises to set off an alarm that can be heard almost all the way to the Tower if he sees Mordred. He hugs Susannah and gets so emotional, in a robotic kind of way, that he begins stuttering again.

What Constant Reader Learns: We get a glimpse of Roland’s plans. He thinks they can circle the Tower from a distance and approach it in a way that isn’t visible to the balcony where the Crimson King is trapped. Then they can work their way to the door beneath him. Of course, plans rarely work out. Plus, Roland’s always been pretty perceptive, but we’ve seen no sign that he anticipates Susannah leaving him.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 5

Susannah’s riding her electric scooter, Patrick is walking, and Roland is pulling Ho Fat II. They make four or five hours before stopping for the night. Patrick is drawing and wants the lone pencil sharpener, which Susannah has (conveniently) brought along in the jar full of erasers. Eventually, he falls asleep, and Susannah sits with Roland and looks at the stars.

What Constant Reader Learns: They spot the Big Dipper, or Lydia’s Dipper as it’s called in Roland’s world, which had disappeared for a while but is another sign of renewal. Roland notes that it must really tick old Crimson King off to look up from his balcony and see it.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 6

Susannah goes to sleep, and dreams.

What Constant Reader Learns: Uh huh. She dreams of a one-sentence chapter.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 7

In her dream, Susannah’s once again in Central Park, and Eddie and Jake are there, grinning at her. This time, behind them, is a door of ironwood with a gold doorknob and a filigree showing two crossed pencils with the erasers cut off. She takes a closer look at the door. Instead of “The Prisoner” or “The Lady of Shadows” or “The Pusher,” it has the runes for the Unfound Door, and “The Artist.” As she turns away, she hears four whispered words: “Time’s Almost Up….Hurry.”

What Constant Reader Learns: So if Patrick draws a door or erases a Susannah or whatever, does she meet Eddie and Jake in another When at a point where they aren’t dead? Or does it kill her and she meets them in the clearing at the end of the path? Or maybe I’m way off base. Only if she goes through a door and we don’t know what happens to her, I’ll be an unhappy camper.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 8

Susannah awakens with a sense of urgency. She knows she needs to leave Roland before they can even see the Tower on the horizon—she might not be able to leave if she sees it. But she isn’t sure how. And she wonders if Patrick shouldn’t go with her, because she can’t see how he’ll be a help to Roland (unlike Oy, who has proven himself).

What Constant Reader Learns: I figure Patrick has a role to play beyond helping Susannah leave. Not sure what that role is yet.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 9

Susannah’s off having a good cry, and when she returns, they see a herd of buffalo in the distance; Roland says in his world they’re called bannock. Patrick begins sketching them, and Susannah notices that he’s drawing them much closer than they are. Only when she looks back, they are closer.

They travel another day, and again she dreams.

What Constant Reader Learns: Hm….so drawing the buffalo closer makes them closer? Susannah doesn’t pick up on this but methinks it’s significant.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 10

The same dream begins again, only Jake and Eddie are not smiling. They are anxious and she can read the tension in their posture. She realizes there’s something she should have seen by now and hasn’t.

What Constant Reader Learns: The buffalo, Suze, the artist. Duh. Suze thinks she’s being backward but she isn’t. She’s the victim of “let’s drag this section out so we can squeeze in a little extra tension and a couple more one-sentence chapters” courtesy of the real Red (sai) King.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 11

Susannah wakes up.

What Constant Reader Learns: Sigh.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 12

Another day of riding and walking. After lunch, while Patrick naps, Roland finally asks Susannah what’s bothering her. She tells him the truth and starts crying again. He holds her and tells her that “let be what will be, and let ka work.” She points out that he’d told her they had outrun ka. “I was wrong, as thee knows,” he says.

What Constant Reader Learns: We don’t get much reaction from Roland as to whether he is surprised or is not. And the sore on her face is growing again.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 13

It’s the third night since leaving Odd’s Lane, and Patrick startles Susannah while she’s on watch. She pulls her gun on him, and scares him. Turns out he was alarmed by the sight of the hobs dancing in the distance, so Susannah suggests he draw a while. He draws her, sore and all. She’s amazed by the beauty and detail of it, except for the sore.

She thinks of the eraser, and thinks of Patrick drawing her just as Roland drew her to his world in a different way and Eddie had drawn her to himself in yet another way.

She gives Patrick an eraser, realizing that Dandelo had cut them off to keep himself safe from what the boy could do. And finally she realizes he did move the buffalo closer.

He begins to work on the drawing again.

What Constant Reader Learns: This is nice: “Dear God, had she been here so long and been through so much without knowing what ka-tet was, what it meant? Ka-tet was family. Ka-tet was love.” And there, folks, we probably have the theme of the Dark Tower series, in a nutshell.

I had to snicker at this, when Susannah’s explaining that she wants Patrick to erase the spot on her face so she’ll treasure the drawing more: “There’s something I’d have you do before I take it for my pretty, for my precious.” Preciousssssssss.

Okay, so if Patrick manages to “erase” the cancer on Susannah’s face, can’t Roland just set him up near the Tower where he can see and draw the Crimson King, and then let him “erase” him off the balcony and—voila—deed done? Like an author can create or destroy a world armed with a pencil and eraser of his own? If the big showdown comes to something so simple, I’m not sure how I’d feel about that.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 14

Susannah feels a weird tingling sensation as Patrick works on her drawing, and suffers a deep, annoying itch when he erases the spot on her face. Just when she thinks she can’t stand it any longer, it disappears.

What Constant Reader Learns: At first, Susannah’s afraid to reach up and touch the spot where the sore had been, but Detta calls her a “yella bitch” and gets her to do it. And, of course, the sore is gone.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 15

Finally, Patrick finishes the drawing, and is anxious to see that she likes it. She tears it off the pad, and wonders what would happen if she tore it right down the middle.

She asks if he will draw something else for her. She describes to him very carefully what she’s looking for and, as he draws, Roland joins them. She uses the door she saw in her dream as her description, and in the dirt, draws the symbols for Unfound.

What Constant Reader Learns: I wonder the same thing—what would happen if she tore the drawing up, or burned it? Or would Patrick have to be the one to do to it whatever is done?

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 16

Roland beats up on himself for not understanding what Patrick could do earlier. “I should have seen that,” he says. “Should have realized what it meant. Susannah, I’m getting old.”

Roland asks why she didn’t tell him of the dreams earlier. “You’ve lost two,” she tells him. “How eager would you have been to lose me as well?” He’s hurt by her comments.

Patrick finishes his drawing, and she’s disappointed that there is no door. She thinks she was wrong after all, but Roland reluctantly tells her she wasn’t. He almost hates to tell her because he selfishly doesn’t want her to leave him. But he knows that he has to do what’s right because it’s what she wants and needs. So he points out that the door has no context. It doesn’t exist because she hasn’t told Patrick where to put it.

So she tells him to set it next to Ho Fat III, and as soon as Patrick draws the cart, the door appears.

What Constant Reader Learns: Another deep truth of the book…Susannah is wondering what world she’d come into if she went through a door Patrick created—it wouldn’t be the real one, she’s sure. “Reality is seldom a thing of black and white, of is and isn’t, of be and not be,” Roland tells her.

Roland has come a long way from the man who let the child Jake die in his pursuit of the Tower, by choosing to help Susannah leave when he knows her skills might help him achieve his quest.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 17

Susannah gathers up her stuff at dawn, then sets it aside. She figures she won’t need it, wherever she goes. She wants Patrick to go with her, and Roland tells the boy he can do whichever he wants. Susannah gets angry, thinking Roland is influencing Patrick’s decision, but Roland assures her he’s hiding his thoughts from Patrick so the boy can make his own choice.

He writes “I will stay. Scared to go sumplace new.” She’s still annoyed that Roland is probably happy about that decision.

What Constant Reader Learns: Detta’s popping up more often these days.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 18

Susannah decides to let Detta take over, thinking Detta’s anger will make saying goodbye easier since Detta doesn’t like Roland, and the feeling is mutual. But he tells her no. “I’ll not say goodbye to you like this, after all this time.”

Detta argues, but then Roland points out there’s someone else who should have a choice to stay or go, and that is Oy. “If Detta asks him if he’d go or stay, he would stay for [Detta] has never been to his liking. If Susannah asks him…why, then I don’t know.”

And, just like that, Detta’s gone. She asks him if he’d like to go with her, to maybe see Jake again. “Ake?” he asks, and is walking toward her until she says, without knowing why, “There are other worlds than these.” And then Oy stops and goes back to sit next to Roland’s feet. “Olan,” he says.

Again, Susannah’s angry with Roland, and accuses him of having his own “glammer,” of drawing Eddie to one death and Jake to two, and now Patrick and Oy.

Roland grovels and begs a while, but Susannah is determined. “She understood the risks [but] Roland’s way was the way of the gun. Roland’s way was death for those who rode or walked beside him.” And she’s sure Patrick and Oy will die soon, and she doesn’t want to.

Finally, Roland pulls open the door and, through it, she sees green grass beneath a light frost, and a path, and an iron fence. Voices were singing a Christmas carol, as they were in her dream. “It could be a trick,” Roland says.

“Life is a trick, love a glammer,” Susannah answers. “Perhaps we’ll meet again, in the clearing at the end of the path.”

He calls out for her to wait, but she doesn’t look back as she rolls through the door and it slams closed behind her, leaving Roland alone. He realizes that if he’d never loved Susannah or Eddie or Jake, then he wouldn’t have felt so alone. “Yet of all his many regrets, the re-opening of his heart was not among them, even now.”

What Constant Reader Learns: Roland’s like some elderly, sad guy, begging Susannah to stay. And I guess that’s the evolution of the gunslinger back into the fully human man, but I have to admit I want to tell him to pull his big boy boots up and accept what ka has wrought.

Although I love the last paragraph, where Roland realizes that even with the pain, he wouldn’t forego the love. This chapter has just been filled with big themes and deep truths. Hats off to sai King.

 

The Dark Tower, Part Five: The Scarlet Field of Can’-Ka No Rey; Chapter 1: The Sore and the Door (Goodbye, My Dear), Section 19

Later, Roland makes breakfast and Patrick eats, but Oy will not. Roland nods and throws out the food, thinking maybe Mordred will come along in good time and find it to his liking. And then they move on, the “steady pulsing power” pushing away thoughts of Susannah.

What Constant Reader Learns: And so we make the final push.


And…that’s it for this week! Next week—same time, same place—we’ll continue our read of the final book of the Dark Tower saga.

19 comments
Adam S.
1. MDNY
And so the last human of Roland's ka-tet goes. We know that the ka-tet no longer exists once it's broken by Eddie's death, but I still think of the original gang that way. Now all Roland has left is Oy.
The whole Patrick drawing thing was pretty obvious. While Sai King has obviously grown as a writer, I still found some things in the later DT books clumsy, including that. But I do agree that the writing was beautiful in much of this chapter.
Too bad that Bill couldn't come along with them. I love Stuttering Bill.
We haven't consistently had 19 chapter sections recently, but in a chapter with travel between Roland's world and a version of ours, it makes sense to have 19 sections again (since 19 is the number attached to the keystone world, though it doesn't appear that Susannah is going to the keystone world if Jake and Eddie have items with Takuro Spirit and Nozz-a-la on them).
Thomas Siirila
2. CallahanOTheRoads
"Roland asks why she didn’t tell him of the dreams earlier. “You’ve lost
two,” she tells him. “How eager would you have been to lose me as well?”
He’s hurt by her comments."
Roland indeed would be hurt. After he finished telling his story in Wizard and Glass, he told the ka-tet that if any of them wanted to go back to their own world, he would allow them to do so. He has changed so much.
There are clues in the dreams of Eddie and Jake: Click! It's a Shinnaro Camera! I drink Nozz-A-La! "She wanted Mr. Merry. She wanted Mr. Christmas" She wants that cup of hot chocolate, the good kind mit schlag on top, and a little sprinkling of nutmeg dotting the cream.
I'm still enjoying the read-through. It's sort of like watching a professional magician going to see another professional magician's act- they usually enjoy the show, but also have a different perception about how it's done, or might be done. You've consistently made very prescient comments.
Suzanne Johnson
3. SuzanneJohnson
It was interesting to me to read Roland's comment that he's not quite ready to get to the Tower yet, after all this time. I find myself feeling somewhat the same. I'm reading on an ereader, so I know that I'm at the 94% mark of the book. I find myself anxious to reach the end and yet also reluctant to get there too fast.
Chris Nelly
4. Aeryl
You do realize we only had those two one sentence chapters so we could bring this up to 19, right?

Hats off indeed
Adam S.
5. MDNY
@4 But Aeryl, if Susannah is not going to the Keystone World (and wherever that door leads, I think we can all agree that the Keystone World is not it) then what is the significance of 19? I noted the return of 19 sections, but I'm not sure of its significance here, it seems perhaps gratuitous in this instance.
Thomas Thatcher
6. StrongDreams
It's sort of like watching a professional magician going to see another professional magician's act- they usually enjoy the show, but also have a different perception about how it's done, or might be done.

Yes! That's it exactly.
Chris Nelly
7. Aeryl
@5 SPOILERS BELOW

I think it is the Keystone World, where else would Eddie and Jake be brothers in truth as they were in ka?

SPOILERS OVER
Adam S.
8. MDNY
@7 SPOILERS- highlight to read
No, it's definitely not. The keystone world is our world, where Stephen King lives. The world Susannah goes to has Takura Spirits and Nozz-a-la. That's why the whole 19 thing doesn't really make sense to me.
Chris Nelly
9. Aeryl
@8, SPOILERS

No, the dreams Susannah has have Takura Spirits and Nozz-a-la(maybe last minute goodbye gifts from a certain bumhug stuck outside the Tower to trick her into not leaving?) We actually don't know what she finds there, except she hopes that she can find the Tet Corporation, which why would she if they weren't in the Keystone World?

END SPOILERS
Adam S.
10. MDNY
@9 Aeryl- Okay I'm pulling out the definitive proof:
(SPOILERS- highlight to read)
When Susannah goes through the door she meets Eddie and Jake. She asks who the president is and Eddie says Gary Hart. And Eddie IS wearing a shirt that says "I DRINK NOZZ-A-LA". So definitely not Keystone New York- doubtful Suze will find Daddy Holmes or Tet corp, definitely not in the keystone world.
END SPOILERS
Jaime Chris
11. Jaime Chris
"Dear God, had she been here so long and been through so much without knowing what ka-tet was, what it meant? Ka-tet was family. Ka-tet was love.” And there, folks, we probably have the theme of the Dark Tower series, in a nutshell.

WELL SAID.

I liked the Susan/Susannah resonance here; earlier in his quest, Roland basically sacrifices Susan for the Tower. At the end of his quest, Susannah *chooses* to leave while she is still alive. In a lot of ways that makes HER stronger than him; she CAN leave, no matter how much he wants her to stay. In a way, Susannah's decision redeems his past with Susan.

I remember reading this part of the book, so close to the ending, when it came out years ago...say whatever you want about King, but he doesn't half-a$$ his writing. As a reader and a writer, I could feel how much he honestly CARED about these characters and this story. And that, in turn, makes us care about them.
Jack Flynn
12. JackofMidworld
Just reading the reread, with Oy choosing to stay with Roland, and Susannah leaving...well, glad I'm at lunch and not trying to read this section while on a work-related phone call or anything.

And hopefully nobody minds if I pose a question or idea here for my fellow readers (I asked the same of my FB friends, wondering how y'all feel).

I saw some conceptual artwork for the currently-defunct DT movie and Susannah was standing next to the rest on her own two legs, which bugged the crap out of me (I feel there's way too much intertwined with how it happened and why to just toss it away and have her walking around) but it did get me thinking of another 'what-if' idea: what if Eddie Dean was Edie Dean instead? I don't think it would break the story and could possibly enhance parental feelings between the Deans and Jake, since they couldn't have a child of their own. Any thoughts?
Chris Nelly
13. Aeryl
I am always down for a gender swap, so I think it could be cool.
Jaime Chris
14. Jaime Chris
As a Queer person myself, I think a same-sex relationship between Susannah and "Edie" would be really cool...I often don't like how heteronormative King tends to be. His Queer characters (like one of the women in "The Stand" - I can't remember her name off the top of my head) tend to be pretty one-dimensional. Although I suppose I have to give him props for even attempting to take on identities that seem so outside of his personal experience. :)
Eric Murray
15. E.Murray
I like the treatment of Susannah's leaving much better than Jake's for a reason I wanted to discuss earlier, but couldn't without spoilers. Roland's willingness to throw away everything in exchange for Jake's life created extremely mixed feelings in me. 80% of me loved it. It was emotionally powerful and (in my opinion) the completion of Roland's character arc. He was, at that moment, fully human and worthy (again, on an emotional level) of the term "savior". However... It also proved him completely and utterly UNworthy of the term. If he is the lynch-pin in all reality and the one destined by ka as the only hope for all worlds, there is only one thing he can never do: throw it away. His course requires him to be steadfast no matter what comes, whether hardship or love. Trading it for Jake would be, in the most literal sense, the highest betrayal possible. It's like the choice Jake (hmmm, never noticed the name similarity before) faces at the end of 11/22/63. Throw away the universe for love or make the ultimate sacrifice of that which matters most? In that view, Roland's choice to let all worlds die for one boy only proves he is unequal to the task - which is hard to swallow.
So this parting helped a little. He lets Susannah go on her own terms. Sure, she isn't dying, but sai King still makes Roland steadfast. It makes me think the momentary weakness with Jake was just an emotional anomoly and that he wouldn't really have thrown it away for him (although we'd hate him for voluntarily letting Jake go AGAIN).
Of course, I think there's a theory that still ties it together and makes sense of both parts. But that will have to wait until we're finished.
Also, I love the comment about "94%" on the e-reader. The little number at the bottom of my Kindle has changed how I read. It would be better to just turn it off...
Jaime Chris
16. Parkinson
Goodbye, Susannah. Don't die during your trip to the unknown.

On the other news....

SO CLOSE.
Jaime Chris
17. Paulie
Did anyone else want Patrick to draw Susannah her legs? I kept wondering why he didn't give her back her legs before she went through the doorway.
Tricia Irish
18. Tektonica
Oh, I don't want this to be over. I've really enjoyed your read, Suzanne. We're so close.....

Roland has certainly come a long way, literally and mentally. Maybe he had to be willing to trade everything for Jake as part of the emotional growth he needed to save the world. Good thing Jake knew what to do.

Sad to see Suzannah go, although she was not my favorite character, but I liked her strength. And yeah....why didn't she have Patrick draw her some legs? Good point, Paulie!
Juan Manuel Guerrero
19. juanmaguerrero
I guess when Roland was ready for throwing the universe away for saving Jake just is a representation of what almost any parent in the universe would do for his/her child, AND since Eddie once told him in DT3 that the rest of the Ka-Tet would continue anyway the task without him, well let's just say he already kind of knew about the meaning of letting go jake and not letting him go this time...

In more simple words, if he never gave a f*ck about the universe as to continue to the Tower AFTER saving the beams and putting universe in jeopardy again by opening the chance Crimson King can use him to scale up to the top of the tower, he might just make the universe go to hell for saving his son, again ^__^

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