Mon
Nov 21 2011 1:00pm

Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch: “Booby Trap”

Administrative note: There will be no TNG Rewatch on Thursday, due to the Thanksgiving holiday. We’ll be back with “The Enemy” a week from today.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch by Keith DeCandido covers season 3 episode “Booby Trap”“Booby Trap”
Written by Michael Wagner & Ron Roman and Michael Piller & Richard Danus
Directed by Gabrielle Beaumont
Season 3, Episode 6
Production episode 40273-154
Original air date: October 30, 1989
Stardate: 43205.6

Captain’s Log: We open on the holodeck, La Forge having taken a young woman named Christy Henshaw on a date on a beach. He even creates a violin player, but she’s just not into him (La Forge or the violin player).

We cut from a La Forge ready for a cold shower to Wes and Data playing three-dimensional chess in Ten-Forward, where they discuss the planetary wreckage they’re flying amongst. This is all that’s left of Orelious IX after the final battle between the Promellians and the Menthar. The bridge picks up a distress call from what turns out to be a thousand-year-old Promellian battle cruiser, still mostly intact. Picard insists on leading the away team over Riker’s objection.

Picard is like a kid in a candy shop — or, say, me in the American Museum of Natural History as a kid — as he checks out the thousand-year-old ship, and even finds the captain’s final log entry, praising his crew and accepting full responsibility for the ship’s destruction.

Unfortunately, since arriving at the ship, the Enterprise has been experiencing odd power drains — and after the away team beams back they start being bombarded with radiation. Another trip to the Promellian ship reveals that there are aceton assimilators that bleed energy from the ship and convert that to radiation that will eventually kill the inhabitants.

Meanwhile, La Forge finds himself re-creating one of the propulsion labs at Utopia Planitia where the Enterprise was built, and also re-creating one of the propulsion experts, Dr. Leah Brahms. They manage to find a way to slow the power drain, and then they have to come up with a way to get out of the trap. Since there is a very brief gap between the force and counterforce, they might be able to adjust for it and move. The problem is, the adjustments need to be made too fast. The only plan La Forge and the Brahms image can come up with is to turn the ship entirely over to the computer.

Then at the last second, La Forge approaches the problem from the other direction: turning everything off except for two thrusters. Picard takes the conn and skillfully flies the ship out of the debris field on minimal power, getting far enough away from the assimilators to get power back. Worf then blows up the battle cruiser, while La Forge goes on the holodeck and gets a kiss from the Brahms image before he ends the program. Not that that’s at all creepy.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch by Keith DeCandido covers season 3 episode “Booby Trap”

Can’t We Just Reverse the Polarity?: La Forge and Brahms toss a lot of nonsense back and forth involving magnetic fields and parallel processors and other technology that doesn’t actually exist before deciding to go down to nothing and just fly on thrusters and nothing else.

Meanwhile, La Forge and the fake Brahms bond over technobabble in a manner that the actors make look incredibly cute despite one of them not actually being a person. Not that that’s at all creepy.

The Boy!?: When it comes to the dangerous flying of the ship with only a couple of thrusters, Picard relieves Wes so he can fly the ship himself. Seriously, you don’t want the teenager flying the ship under those circumstances....

There is No Honor in Being Pummeled: Worf’s response upon boarding the Promellian cruiser is: “Admirable — they died at their posts.”

If I Only Had a Brain…: Data is the one who is able to get the Enterprise to play the Promellian captain’s logs with his mad android skillz.

Syntheholics Anonymous: Guinan gives La Forge advice on how to flirt, which boils down to, “Don’t try so bloody hard.” She also mentions that she’s attracted to bald men because a bald man helped her once when she was hurting. (The likely origin of that will be shown in “Time’s Arrow Part 2.”)

No Sex, Please, We’re Starfleet: After a failed date — which La Forge’s long-suffering attitude indicates is the latest in a series — the chief engineer finds himself falling for a holographic image. Not that that’s at all creepy.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch by Keith DeCandido covers season 3 episode “Booby Trap”

What Happens on the Holodeck Stays on the Holodeck: According to Wes, La Forge spent “days” putting together the perfect date program for his liaison with Christy. These days of effort resulted in — a beach, two drinks, and a violin player with a scarf on his head. This was the best he could come up with in “days”? No wonder she wasn’t interested.

Then, of course, the holodeck gives La Forge the perfect date without him asking for it. And the holodeck can apparently create a personality based on profiles and debates at engineering caucuses that flirts, offers to cook, and gives backrubs. Not that that’s at all creepy.

Welcome Aboard: Susan Gibney does an excellent turn as the image of Brahms, both as the monotone computer image and then charming with the personality the computer gives her. Albert Hall has tremendous gravitas as the Promellian captain.

And then we have this week’s Robert Knepper moment: Julie Warner, of Doc Hollywood, Nip/Tuck, and Crash as La Forge’s failed date.

I Believe I Said That: “Oh, good Lord, didn’t anybody here build ships in bottles when they were boys?”

“I did not play with toys.”

“I was never a boy.”

“I did, sir.”

“Thank you, Mr. O’Brien. Proceed.”

(After beam-down and Riker giving O’Brien a dubious expression) “I did! I really did! Ships in bottles — great fun!”

Picard bemoaning kids today, Worf and Data pointing out that they don’t fit the mold, O’Brien sucking up to the captain, and Picard appreciating it.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch by Keith DeCandido covers season 3 episode “Booby Trap”

Trivial Matters: An early draft for the script had Picard be the one to work with Brahms and be interested, but Michael Piller rightly thought that an episode that was basically about a guy in love with this ’57 Chevy would be better suited to focus on the engineer.

Brahms was originally to be named Navid Daystrom and was supposed to be a descendant of Richard Daystrom from the original series’ “The Ultimate Computer,” but nobody told the casting department that they were supposed to cast an African-American woman, so they cast Dibney and renamed the character.

La Forge will take another shot at Christy Henshaw, with somewhat more success, in “Transfigurations.”

This is the first episode of a Star Trek series directed by a woman. Beaumont will go on to become a regular director of TNG, and also helm an episode each of Deep Space Nine and Voyager.

This episode markes the first mention of the Starfleet shipyards located on Mars at Utopia Planitia.

Finally, the real Leah Brahms will appear in “Galaxy’s Child,” where we will find out just how much margin for error there is in the computer’s calculations for creating a personality.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation Rewatch by Keith DeCandido covers season 3 episode “Booby Trap”

Make it So: “One propeller, sir?” Okay, this episode? Is totally creepy.

Seriously, La Forge creates a voice interface of Dr. Leah Brahms, and just keeps adding to it and adding to it until it becomes a photonic blow-up doll that spouts technobabble (which probably counts as foreplay to La Forge).

And then he kisses her and it’s just so totally oogy.

It was one thing when Riker fell in love on the holodeck in “11001001,” because that was planned by the Bynars, and Riker was aware that it was a little weird. But this isn’t a trap set by computer experts, it’s just La Forge being really really creepy.

It’s not like he needed her — La Forge has an entire engineering staff. At one point, Picard asks La Forge to pass on congratulations to his team, which raises the question of why La Forge wasn’t working with a team.

There’s a lot of good in this episode — Picard’s archaeological geekiness, the simplicity of both the trap and the ultimate solution, the nobility of the Promellian captain, the whole ships-in-bottles bit — but ultimately it’s impossible to rate it as a good one because it’s so gosh-darned creepy!

 

Warp factor rating: 4


Keith R.A. DeCandido has written many books and comics and you can get autographed copies of several of his novels and comic books directly from him. Autographed copies of the print editions of his fantastical police procedurals SCPD: The Case of the Claw and Dragon Precinct (the latter a trade reissue of the 2004 novel) are also available for preorder. Find out more about Keith at his web site, which is a portal to (among many other things) his Facebook page, his Twitter feed, his blog, and his podcasts, Dead Kitchen Radio, The Chronic Rift, and the Parsec Award-winning HG World.

39 comments
Tesh
1. Tesh
Isn't that creepy factor sort of the point? That's a recurring theme with the Holodeck, after all; fantastic tool, dark undercurrent of implications.

I'm glad they revisited the relationship in "Galaxy's Child". Also, didn't Geordie have a wife named Leah in the series finale? Just a throwaway line, but it seems like a 'shipper's treat.
Cait Glasson
2. CaitieCat
Totally. And I think they show a good deal of how creepy it is in the episode where the real Leah Brahms shows up, and is rightly enraged and creeped-the-f**k-out by his behaviour and the holoversion of her.

Good idea, completely undermined by an execution that is overstuffed with Unfortunate Implications.
Tesh
3. don3comp
And they got mad at Barclay? Talk about management not setting a good example!

Creepy-ness aside, though, I do remember enjoying the chemistry between Burton and Dibney. I also enjoyed the "souring the milk" solution to the problem at hand.
William Frank
4. scifantasy
Tesh @1: Yeah, in the finale Geordi talks about his wife Leah, who's clearly Brahms.

And that's not the only bit--in the finale Picard also refers to O'Brien's "ships in bottles" hobby.
David Stumme
5. grenadier
For a non-canon explanation of Guinan's refernce to when she "was hurting," we might also look towards Michael Jan Friedman's "Oblivion" from the Stargazer novels.
F Shelley
6. FSS
bah - it's not creepy. if there was really a holodeck, the worst job on the ship would be cleaning up all the semen each day after hours and hours of "recreation" on the holodeck.
Tesh
7. RichF
Was it intentional that the violin player in Geordi's holo-date with Christy is playing the fifth Hungarian dance by Brahms?
Keith DeCandido
8. krad
FSS: It is too creepy because La Forge wasn't there for recreation, he was there to work.

RichF: Given that the character originally had a different name, hard to say if it was a deliberate homage or not. :)
Adrian J.
9. LightningStorm
@6, lol!!

I'm sure that the magical technology combination of sensors, replicators, matter reclamation, force fields and transporters makes cleanup an automatic process. There's a reason we never see vacuums and windex on the Enterprise ;)
Tesh
10. Anony
Poor Geordi. Bright, friendly, cool in a crisis, only to discover in this episode that he's the most socially inept of the whole cast. I was going to ask how his engineering team must have felt during the crisis; unfortunately, I read articles all the way through before posting.

I liked the Brahms episodes, though. They aren't the greatest, but they raise interesting issues and present interesting problems for the crew to solve. Geordi discovering a soul mate through such improbable circumstances is poignant, although the implied long-term fate of their relationship in the series finale feels like pure fanfic.

But yeah, Geordi is a creep here. Maybe as an engineer he's really in love with the computer itself, and subconsciously uses the hologram as a way to avoid facing the even more awkward truth.
Michael Burstein
11. mabfan
Keith, regarding this:


Brahms was originally to be named Navid Daystrom and was supposed to be a descendant of Richard Daystrom from the original series’ “The Ultimate Computer,” but nobody told the casting department that they were supposed to cast an African-American woman, so they cast Dibney and renamed the character.


I seem to recall reading somewhere that the producers (or someone) had the idea of having Georgi involved with a Daystrom decendent because they wanted to show a normal interracial relationship, but that no one remembered that Daystrom himself was not white. It was an ironic occurence in that both Star Trek series were trying to show a future in which race no longer mattered as much. As it is, that's why Brahms ends up being from the Daystrom Institute, so they could keep the reference.

-- Michael A. Burstein
Tesh
12. TheCabanaMan
Yup, the adult creepiness in this episode is 'interesting' if not bizzarre. What is the term used in Voyager? Holo-Novel? With all the rules and regulations in Star Fleet, I thought that there would be rules about the Holodeck. what the holograms could and couldn't (wouldn't) do. I have wondered if the holodeck has a 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' aspect to it? Opinions?
Tyler Durden
13. Balance
@12 I would think Star Fleet would have a rule like that. Something that prevents characters from acting beyond a kiss. I mean isn't TNG Enterprise cruising around with a small city. Full families are on board. That's way too many teenagers around. Of course, there are failsafes to prevent the holodeck characters from killing. And we all know how well those work.

If an orgy did go down, then I would think the participents would do the cleanup themselves. I'd just beam all that shit into space.
Tesh
14. euphbass
It's definitely creepy when it's a real person - perhaps not so much with fictional characters (I mean, in the Star Trek universe, obviously, they're *all* fictional...).

And I bet there are rules and regulations about appropriate use of holodecks (and probably built-in restrictions too, or at least age restrictions). I can't imagine a family-filled fleet flagship having what can essentially be brothels on board (although they do seem to be pretty sexually liberal on the whole - perhaps it's not an issue for them). Did they not have that sort of holodeck on DS9, which was civillian and slightly seedy?

I'm also glad they dealt with the implications of this episode in "Galaxy's Child" - I don't know if it was always intended, of if the writers realised afterwards the creepiness of it all, and the issues it raised.
Amir Noam
15. Amir
As Riker said to Brenna Odell in Up the Long Ladder: "The ship cleans itself".
Michael Poteet
16. MikePoteet
@3 - This happened before Barclay's stuff, and it is duly referenced in the latter episode. Yeah, it's kinda creepy, although I guess it never struck me as such, because (a) she's not really there and (b) Geordi, by episode's end, realizes the inappropriatness (I guess) and moves on with his life.

Is this any less creepy then "The Doctor's Wife," where a real, live, flesh-and-blood sentient being has her personality, hopes, dreams, memories, all wiped by House and replaced with the TARDIS, and then she and the Doctor get to be all mushy for the rest of the episode?
Captain Hammer
17. Randalator
Balance @13

If an orgy did go down, then I would think the participents would do the cleanup themselves. I'd just beam all that shit into space.

When you're on a month-long trip through space you won't beam anything into space unless it is absolutely necessary. Resources are very limited on a space ship, even one so advanced as the USS Enterprise, so everything is recycled if possible. In the case of Star Trek this means that anything the replicators can convert back into energy they WILL convert back into energy. This includes the leftovers of your orgy.


re: LaForge's fling

I don't think that having sex or falling in love with a hologram per se is creepy, after all I think everyone knows what it's like to crush on a fictional character (e.g. from a TV series, a movie, etc.). And as for the logical extension of said crush via holodeck, for all intents and purposes the hologram cannot be discerned from a real human being. So I don't see this as anything more than a one night stand or paying an escort for sex but without the interpersonal implications associated with either.

The creepy lies in the fact that he basically turns an actual person into an advanced sex toy without her explicit consent or even considering the moral implications. Thankfully, TNG adressed this big issue in a later episode.
Amir Noam
18. Amir
Randalator:
"for all intents and purposes the hologram cannot be discerned from a real human being"

Ah, but this is Geordi - the guy who can see so much beyond the normal spectrum that he can see things that the ship's sensors can't (Justice?), and can always tell when humans lie (Up the Long Ladder).

There's no way he could look at a Holodeck construct and confuse it with a living, breathing human being.
Tesh
19. Pendard
From the focus of this comment thread, you would think the holodeck was the booby trap in the title of the episode! (Double entendre intended.)

@KRAD: I can't see why you think Geordi's behavior is so creepy. He creates the hologram so he can save the ship, he's all business until he succeeds (he refuses a massage, for example) and then at the end he indulges himself in a kiss, and then he shuts it off. We've seen people kiss holodeck characters on many occasions, I really don't see what the big deal is.

@FSS (#6): I don't know about this sex is holograms business! They're light trapped in forcefields, I doubt they feel very realistic...

@TheCabanaMan (#12): There's nothing about Starfleet that suggests to me they have institutional prudish rules about sexuality. Riker strongly hints he has sex on the holodeck in "The Perfect Mate," and Janeway and Tuvok used the holodeck for sex on Voyager (though in Tuvok's case it was more of a medical condition!). On DS9, the human characters seem to disapprove of using holosuites for sex, but it seems to have more to do with Quark getting rich off a holographic brothel.
Tesh
20. Tesh
@18 Oi, great point about Geordie's vision. The *characters* play well off of each other, but his vision's quirks would have made that require a lot of self-delusion from Geordie.
Cait Glasson
21. CaitieCat
@19: I'll just QFT Randalator:

The creepy lies in the fact that he basically turns an actual person
into an advanced sex toy without her explicit consent or even
considering the moral implications.

Riker and Minuet is different: Minuet never was a real woman. She's a computer construct from the get-go. Leah Brahms is a real woman, and using a moving blow-up doll of her, and further thinking it meant anything about what she actually felt? Yeah, that's creepy. It's objectfication in the most literal sense.
Captain Hammer
22. Randalator
Amir @18

There's no way he could look at a Holodeck construct and confuse it with a living, breathing human being.

Well, in view of the fact that LaForge can use the holodeck like any regular crew member, one could argue that the computer has ways of making the illusion work for someone like him as well. If it were just forcefields and light to him, he couldn't operate/interact with anything created holographically (say, for example, the computer consoles he created in his programme) as to him it would be nothing like the real world equivalent. So it stands to reason that the Holodeck is in fact able to make a human being work for him as well (pun intended).


Pendard @19

I don't know about this sex is holograms business! They're light trapped in forcefields, I doubt they feel very realistic...

The holodeck can create illusions of all kinds of objects and materials that feel absolutely realistic to the touch. Why shouldn't it be able to do the same with living things?

We've seen and will see crewmembers physically interact with all kinds of characters and animals on the holodeck, which implies that they feel at least real enough to not break willing suspension of disbelief...
Tesh
23. Dils
This episode takes place 100 years after Dr. Daystrom was on the original Enterprise, so he could very easily have caucasian or mostly caucasian descendants. They should have left her as Navid Daystrom.
Tesh
24. raelee
@ Dils that was my first thought, so many years later why would one believe his ancestors would have to be the same color as him? She could also have been half-Vulcan, half-Betazoid or any other Alien they may have wanted. She didn't even need to be fully human, let alone black. It was a bit shortsighted.
F Shelley
25. FSS
@various

1. If the holodeck can create bullets that kill (First Contact) and water that drips off you after leaving the holodeck (pilot episode), I would imagine it could create a realistically human lover easily

2. And what would the holodeck generated lover be, if not just an enhanced fantasy?

3. And what, at the end of the day, is wrong with a fantasy lover, albiet one that others could potentially see? I had the same problem with the Voyager girls when they found the doctor's fantasy holodeck programs, starring them, and got all pissy. I mean, if you're an attractive person, someone somewhere is doing something naughty and wrong, and you're there (in his/her head). Is it wrong? Do you own your own image? Is it creepy? No, no, and n0.
Captain Hammer
26. Randalator
FSS @25

Not that I'm disagreeing with you re: realism, but the water dripping off you after leaving the holodeck means that the holodeck actually replicates certain elements in your simulation. That would not be true for animals or people...
Tesh
27. Paulie
Regarding use of the holodeck for adult recreational activities. I recall an episode where Riker exited from a sexually tense situation and says, "If you need me, I'll be on holodeck 3". Seems pretty clear to me.
Tesh
28. Anony
Modern Star Trek was increasingly self-conscious about its social relevance over the years. Even the original series got it wrong as often as not, but later Trek (with exceptions) seemed more about paying lip service to utopian diversity than using it as a fundamental force behind the show's direction. So when a show would focus on racial or gender issues, it often felt horribly out of place or showboaty. However, I didn't think this episode went wrong in that way. There's no special emphasis on their race; she's an imaginary girl who's a good match for Geordi.

FSS, I think the creepiness stems from the amount of effort involved in acting out a fantasy in real time physical world versus mulling it over privately in one's mind. Fantasies are fine, but as soon as they start leaving the realm of pure fantasy, other people wonder where you draw the line.
Keith DeCandido
29. krad
Again, my issue isn't with using the holodeck for sex in and of itself, it's a) using a real person as the template for your blow-up doll and b) doing it while working.

For that matter, leaving aside the flirting, I'm not sure what he gained by giving her a personality -- things were going smoothly until then, and then they lost precious time arguing at each other....

---Keith R.A. DeCandido
Captain Hammer
30. Randalator
Keith @29

I'm not sure what he gained by giving her a personality -- things were going smoothly until then, and then they lost precious time arguing at each other...

Well, I can see where that might be beneficial. If it was just about tossing facts back and forth, he wouldn't even have needed the personality-less hologram, true. But with a real personality challenging him, forcing him to think in new directions and allowing him to think more creatively by taking his mind of the narrow number-crunching, all arguing and bickering aside, this approach might well have been more effective.

Just remember how often you can't remember or figure out something important and no matter how much you dwell on it, it just escapes your grasp. And then suddenly, when you're occupied with something completely different, it just pops into your head almost effortlessly. That's basically what happened here, the "real" Leah Brahms allowed LaForge to give free rein to his thought process, which wouldn't have been possible if he'd just worked with the computer as some kind of glorified textbook.
Michael Burke
31. Ludon
@various on Leah Brahms and Dr. Daystrom.

From today's perspective, it is easy to say what they should have done. We can see things that could have made the story (episode) better. However. Some of us seem to have forgotten - and some of us don't know - that there were sometimes real-world reasons why the show either glossed over a story point or wimped out on potentially strong ideas. The original series was the only series that ran as a network show. Next Generation and those that followed ran in syndication. The (TV) stations around the country have a greater degree of freedom to not air an episode of a syndicated show than with network shows. But, network show episodes do get pulled too. The St. Louis CBS affiliate, KMOV, will not hesitate to replace 60 Minutes with a Christian oriented 'Special' if they don't like one of the stories on 60 Minutes that week. KMOV had the syndication rights to Next Generation. While having a white woman play the part of a member of a black man's family (in this case) might have squeaked by the powers at KMOV, I'm sure that the episode would have been pulled from air in other parts of the country had they played it that way. Other episodes - still to be discussed - surely would have been pulled from KMOV had Star Trek 'done what they really should have done.'

And we have not improved as a people. Think of things that today can only be addressed as bad.
Tesh
32. JohnElliott
No-one's complained yet about Picard ordering Worf to blow up a priceless historical artefact rather than emplacing warning beacons and sending for a team of specialists to dismantle the trap and get the bait out in one piece?
Tesh
33. Erik Jensen
@32
Yeah, that's always bothered me, too.
Justin Devlin
34. EnsignJayburd
Did they not have that sort of holodeck on DS9, which was civillian and slightly seedy?
Huh-huh. You said "seedy."


Yes, they had Quark's holo-suites and they were more than slightly seedy. At one point an alien played by Jeffrey Combs (before both Weyoun and Brunt) was so bored with normal, run-of-the-mill holo-suite sex (involving Orion slavegirls and the like) that he was willing to pay Quark whatever it took to get it on with Major Kira. Quark spent most of that episode unsuccessfully attempting to get a holo-image of Kira, who had never used a holo-suite.
When you're on a month-long trip through space you won't beam anything into space unless it is absolutely necessary. Resources are very limited on a space ship, even one so advanced as the USS Enterprise, so everything is recycled if possible. In the case of Star Trek this means that anything the replicators can convert back into energy they WILL convert back into energy. This includes the leftovers of your orgy.
Yes, but back before the days of replicators and holodecks, orgy leftovers were recycled into the ...ahem...protein resequencers.
Tesh
35. CaptHarper
@JohnElliot 32

Picard orders the ship destroyed to prevent other people from flying into the ancient booby trap and dying. It wouldn't have been worth the risk to try to "dismantle" the trap, so priceless artefact be damned.
Tesh
36. Sam0
@CaptHarper 35

Nope -- the logic doesn't hold up. This ship had been there for a thousand years, and it was still stuck alone in this asteroid field until the Enterprise comes along. That leaves only two explanations:

(1) This ship was stuck in a place so out-of-the-way that no one would happen by it for a thousand years, on average, which makes it rather unlikely to be a hazard before some archaeological team could get there. Also, note that the Enterprise only found it because it still had a distress beacon on -- which they turned off, so it likely won't attract any other ships. Even if it did, the Enterprise could have left a hazard beacon, as they did in other episodes.

OR

(2) No other ships had been caught in this asteroid field because all the other ships were smart enough to either detect it ahead of time (and not go in) or they knew how to get out.

In other words -- either it's very unlikely that anyone else would ever come by this thing, or the Enterprise crew were just too stupid to know how to spot or deal with some ancient booby trap that everyone else knows about.

Either way, they could easily send out an archaeological team to check the thing out in more detail and see if there were a way to extricate it before blowing it up. It wasn't even putting off its distress signal anymore, so why the devil would anyone come by to have a look even if they did detect it?? It was just an old piece of space debris.
Tesh
37. Electone
I can't believe I waited this long to comment on this episode. Must be because it was on tv yesterday and I had another chance to watch it. There are a lot of great moments and the plot is very interesting, but what really kills it for me is Levar Burton. Did the writers want the viewing public to dislike the character of Geordi Laforge? Or was it the apparent lack of acting skill and horrible delivery of lines by Burton that did it?

"This is incccreedddibbbblle."
"It's going to go (insert whistle), cshrrrhsshrhrh..."
"And I'm not used to dyin.'"
"Damn right!"
"The odds say it's even money." (I thought there wasn't money in the 24th century. Why is he using a 20th century cliche?)

Those are just a few zingers he delivered in this episode and there are plenty more.

Also, wouldn't the construction of the U.S.S. Galaxy be going back to "the beginning" ?
Tesh
38. JohnC
My favorite moment here is when Picard walks in, obviously stressed and anxious because his beloved ship and it's crew of 1000+ are in danger of being microwaved in a matter of minutes, and there is his chief engineer screwing around with a holographic representation that just happens to look like a hot crewmember. The "are you F'ing kidding me?" look on his face is perfect. If Geordi lived in today's times, his favorite date would be a fleshlight and a POV porn flick.
Tesh
39. coredalien
The plot point that bothered me (and that frankly didn't ring true) was Picard saying, I hope we don't do what they did, and then immediately going with 'fire phasers'.

It seems pretty clear that a ship trapped like this would have tried firing their weapons.

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