Thu
Aug 13 2009 12:05pm

Rogue in the ambient: C.J. Cherryh’s Rider books

C.J. Cherryh’s Rider at the Gate and Cloud’s Rider are a slightly odd kind of science fiction. Humanity has come from the stars to colonize the planet of Finisterre, but the starships don’t come any more. (There’s no explanation of this, it’s just background.) On the planet all lifeforms can project images and emotions, and humans are vulnerable to confusion and catastrophe. But the humans have made an alliance with creatures they call nighthorses. The nighthorses give humans protection against a world that’s dangerous, the humans give the horses continuity of purpose and companionship. The preachers call in the streets “heed not the beasts” and respectable families scorn their children if they become riders, but the colony’s fragile economy and industries would collapse without them. The story begins when strange riders sweep into town bearing news of a rogue horse and a death, trouble at their heels.

It’s as if Cherryh simultaneously wanted to write a Western and undermine the tropes of the animal companion novel. The nighthorses (and yes, nightmares) aren’t much like our horses—they can be ridden but it exhausts them, and the riders mostly walk, they’re carnivorous (especially fond of bacon) and project telepathically. But the riders are a lot like cowboys, living on the edges of society, in a rough fraternity, with their feuds and vendettas and romances. Guil Stuart leaves town to avenge his partner—his business and romantic partner, as it happens. There’s a lot about the essential supplies the riders need to carry and the shelters set up to support them, about their lonely journeys with only their horses. The riders mostly protect convoys, rather than herding cattle, and they are absolutely essential to holding the colony together. All the same they’re not respectable, they’re mostly men and hard-living women, they’re often illiterate, they carry rifles; they’re people of the edges and frontiers, they have the cowboy nature.

The book is full of what the riders call the “ambient,” the telepathic background projected by the horses and the dangerous vermin of the planet. Humans can think into the ambient and read from it, but it’s mediated by their horses. The horses have names that are images like Burn and Flicker and Cloud and Moon, and they are bonded to their riders but not in a way that’s common in animal companion novels. To start with, they often won’t do what their riders want, they’re very demanding, they have their own opinions, and they twist things. They’re alien, but they behave far more like real animals than any other animal companion I’ve encountered. Their humans are shaped by the horses, as much as the other way around. Riders are free to wander the world, on their horses, other people are bound behind walls and rider protection. Riders protect the settlements but don’t belong to them. The bond between horse and rider is close and strange. It gives the riders a kind of telepathy with each other, mediated by their horses.

There’s only one scene, where a horse calls to a girl, which does read like a typical animal-companion bonding scene. It then turns the whole paradigm upside-down by having everything turn to absolute disaster. These scenes are very powerful and memorable.

It’s an interesting world with logistics that feel real, as is typical for Cherryh. The economy makes sense, and you can see how the people are hanging on to technology and industry in difficult circumstances, even in these books set at the very edges of civilization. Their ancestors had starflight, they have blacksmiths and are glad to have them. They have trucks, but they also have oxcarts. Their existence is marginal, and they can’t slip much further and continue to exist at all.

Danny Fisher, the novice rider who wants to learn better, spends most of both books cold (this is a good time of year to read these, as they’re full of snow and ice and winter mountains) uncomfortable and miserable. He does learn from experience, fortunately. He’s a lot closer to standard humanity (he grew up in a town and can read) that the other main hero Guil Stuart, who thinks almost more like a horse. Guil’s experience is contrasted with Danny’s inexperience, but Danny’s much more likeable.

The plots are complicated, and serve mostly to illuminate the way the world works. That’s OK. That’s the kind of books these are. There’s a world-revelation at the end of Cloud’s Rider that makes me long for more—but after all this time I doubt more is coming. These aren’t Cherryh’s best, but they’re interesting and readable and unusual, and I come back to them every few years.


Jo Walton is a science fiction and fantasy writer. She’s published eight novels, most recently Half a Crown and Lifelode, and two poetry collections. She reads a lot, and blogs about it here regularly. She comes from Wales but lives in Montreal where the food and books are more varied.

This article is part of C. J. Cherryh Reread: ‹ previous | index | next ›
5 comments
Eugenie Delaney
1. EmpressMaude
I really really wish she'd give us one more visit to Finisterre.

I'll happily read anything Cherryh writes, but I am growing a tad weary of the Foreigner books.

What I really want is Cyteen III. Can we make that happen?

I also want to know more about the mysterious Mazianni planet.

Ugh.

How can so prolific an author leave us wanting so much more?
Tony Zbaraschuk
2. tonyz
Prolific authors give us so much that we see lots of places where more would be fun.

These two books are definitely the Anti-Mercedes-Lackey thing when it comes to horses ;)
Peter Ahlstrom
3. Peter Ahlstrom
I reread these in the last year and they were every bit as good as I remembered (for the reasons Jo pointed out). I'd also like to see a third book. But that's common with Cherryh—I'd like to see more Chanur, a followup to Tripoint, etc. etc. Was very happy with Regenesis as well, though it was basically more of the same Cyteen but kicked up a notch in the second half.
Declan Ryan
4. decco999
I've said it so often: CJ Cherryh is a master when it comes to creating believable, alien worlds. The "Rider" books are simply further proof of the fact. Are they for the introductory reader to Cherryh, why not! The characters are complex, the stories intense. Compelling.
Peter Ahlstrom
5. DG Lewis
And I've said it so often, but it's worth saying again: not only does CJ create believable, alien worlds, she simply immerses you in them, and doesn't spend untold pages explaining them.

The result is that you spend the first fifty pages trying to figure out what the hell is going on, and the rest of the book wondering how you could possibly have been confused when it's so obvious how everything just is.

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