Tor.com content by

Lish McBride

Fiction and Excerpts [4]
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Fiction and Excerpts [4]

Burnt Sugar

Ava, Lock, and Ezra are on assignment—for the magical mafia, of course. Faced with a gingerbread house, they're pretty sure that what's inside isn't nearly as sweet as the outside. It never is.

Firebug (Excerpt)

, || Ava is a firebug—she can start fires with her mind. Which would all be well and good if she weren't caught in a deadly contract with the Coterie, a magical mafia. She's one of their main hitmen… and she doesn't like it one bit. Not least because her boss, Venus, killed Ava's mother.

This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Moral Ambiguity, YA Literature, and The Princess Bride

I’ve been thinking a lot about the movie The Princess Bride. Which, really, has been sort of a semi-consistent thing since childhood. Lately, though, something has occurred to me, and really, I don’t know why I didn’t think about this before. It’s about Westley. Namely, it’s the Dread Pirate Roberts problem.

Now, farm boy Westley is great—don’t get me wrong, but he’s a bit doormat-ish: sweet and kind, but lacking a little…something. Even as a child I though Buttercup was kind of a brat in the beginning and I wanted Westley to stick up for himself a little. So Farm Boy Westley wasn’t my thing. However, later in the film when he shows back up dressed all in black, expertly wielding a sword and full of swagger? We as the audience can’t help but love him.

[Except…the Dread Pirate Roberts takes no survivors, right?]

Firebug (Excerpt)

Ava is a firebug—she can start fires with her mind. Which would all be well and good if she weren’t caught in a deadly contract with the Coterie, a magical mafia. She’s one of their main hitmen… and she doesn’t like it one bit. Not least because her boss, Venus, killed Ava’s mother.

When Venus asks Ava to kill a family friend, Ava rebels. She knows very well that you can’t say no to the Coterie and expect to get away with it, though, so she and her friends hit the road, trying desperately to think of a way out of the mess they find themselves in—preferably keeping the murder to a minimum.

Amazon buy button Firebug Check out an excerpt below from Lish McBride’s Firebug, available September 23rd from Henry Holt! You can also find out more about the cover design process here.

[Read an excerpt]

Necromancing the Stone (Excerpt)

We’ve got an excerpt from Necromancing the Stone by Lish McBride:

With the defeat of the evil Douglas behind him, Sam LaCroix is getting used to his new life. Okay, so he hadn’t exactly planned on being a powerful necromancer with a seat on the local magical council and a capricious werewolf sort-of-girlfriend, but things are going fine, right?

Well . . . not really. He’s pretty tired of getting beat up by everyone and their mother, for one thing, and he can’t help but feel that his new house hates him. His best friend is a werebear, someone is threatening his sister, and while Sam realizes that he himself has a lot of power at his fingertips, he’s not exactly sure how to use it. Which, he has to admit, is a bit disconcerting.

But when everything starts falling apart, he decides it’s time to step up and take control. His attempts to do so just bring up more questions, though, the most important of which is more than a little alarming: Is Douglas really dead?

[Read more]

Things That Go Baaa in the Night

I grew up watching horror movies. Just to give you an idea of what kind of time span we’re talking about, I’ll just say that while vampires were continuing their trend in becoming sexy blood-suckers, werewolves were still being portrayed as mindless, violent creatures who wanted to eat your face. So we’re talking the days of Silver Bullet, The Howling, and, of course (one my favorites), Monster Squad, which teaches us that Wolfman does indeed have “nards.”

I still love a good werewolf movie. The last decade has spawned some greats, like Dog Soldiers and Brotherhood of the Wolf, and I’m loving the variety. There’s more depth and breadth to the genre than some people think. They’re not all slaughter films. Some, like Ladyhawke, go with a different kind of werewolf all together, and involve a young Matthew Broderick climbing through a medieval sewer system. (Tell me that didn’t just sell you right there.)

[Making the leap from werewolves to…weresheep?]