Tor.com content by

Stefan Raets

The Future’s So Bright: Last Year by Robert Charles Wilson

In the near future, time travel technology allows a wealthy real estate magnate to open a huge passageway to the 19th century. Five stories tall, the “Mirror” can be used to transfer not only people but even heavy equipment to the past. The result is the city of Futurity, an outpost of the 21st century on the plains of 1876 Illinois. Equal parts colony and tourist destination for curious visitors from the future, Futurity is the crossroads where two versions of America meet.

Jesse Cullum works security in Futurity’s Tower Two, which is the part of the city open to 19th century “locals” who want to experience 21st century wonders like air conditioning and heated swimming pools or get a look at the dioramas giving a carefully edited glimpse of the future world. After Jesse foils an attempt to assassinate the visiting U.S. president Ulysses S. Grant, Futurity’s management asks him to help in the subsequent investigation. The would-be assassin’s weapon was a Glock, which could only have come from the future. Jesse and his partner Elizabeth, a 21st century woman, must work together to figure out how a gun from the future ended up in the hands of a 19th century assassin…

[The past will never be the same.]

Going Through the Spin Cycle: Vortex by Robert Charles Wilson

Welcome back to the Tor.com eBook Club! November’s pick is Spin, the first book in a sci-fi trilogy from Robert Charles Wilson. The following essay, originally published August 2011, is a review of Vortex, book three in the trilogy, so beware of possible spoilers! You can also head back and read Stefan’s thoughts on Spin.

Vortex is the long-awaited third novel in Robert Charles Wilson’s Spin Cycle. The first book, Spin, won the 2006 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Its sequel Axis met with a much cooler reception. So, is Vortex as good as Spin? Well, not quite, but it’s considerably better than Axis. All in all, Vortex is a great novel, a worthy closer to the Spin Cycle, and a book you’ll definitely want to read if you enjoyed the previous two volumes.

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Going Through the Spin Cycle: Axis by Robert Charles Wilson

Welcome back to the Tor.com eBook Club! November’s pick is Spin, the first book in a sci-fi trilogy from Robert Charles Wilson. The following essay, originally published July 2011, is an in-depth reread of Axis, book two in the trilogy, so beware of major spoilers! You can also head back and read Stefan’s thoughts on Spin.

Many readers expressed disappointment about the long-awaited sequel to Spin. Looking back now, it’s understandable that people felt let down. Expecting a better novel than Spin was probably unrealistic. Even expecting something just as good was, in retrospect, on the hopeful side, given how high Robert Charles Wilson set the bar with the first novel. Regardless, I feel that Axis is a good—if not great—novel that adds a new dimension to the Spin universe and builds a solid bridge to the third volume, Vortex.

What follows contains huge spoilers for Spin and Axis, but nothing about Vortex.

[Read more]

Going through the Spin Cycle: Spin by Robert Charles Wilson

Welcome back to the Tor.com eBook Club! November’s pick is Spin, the first book in a sci-fi trilogy from Robert Charles Wilson. The following essay, originally published July 2011, is an in-depth reread of Spin, so beware of major spoilers!

With the recent publication of Vortex by Robert Charles Wilson, I decided to re-read the first two books in the trilogy, Spin and Axis, to warm up for the long-awaited new novel and to refresh my memory. Like every truly excellent novel, it turns out that Spin is better and more rewarding on the second read-through. What follows below contains huge spoilers for Spin, but nothing about Axis or Vortex. Seriously, don’t read this if you haven’t read Spin yet.

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Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: The Graveyard Game, Part 5

In this week’s installment of the Kage Baker Company Series Reread, we’ll finish up the final sections of The Graveyard Game, from the end of last week’s post up until the very end of the novel.

As always, previous posts in the reread can be found on our lovely index page. Also as always, please be aware that this reread contains spoilers for the entire Company series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

And with that we’re off for our final post about The Graveyard Game!

[I will not be silenced.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: The Graveyard Game, Part 4

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread at Tor.com! I was planning to get through the rest of The Graveyard Game in this post, but in the end there was too much to discuss in the chapters set in 2225, so that’s what we’ll cover today, saving the final set of chapters for next week.

As always, you can find all previous posts in the reread on our index page, a document of such rare and surpassing beauty that small children in distant lands have been known to memorize and recite it while at play. Also as always, please be aware that this reread contains spoilers for the entire series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

[Why couldn’t he be wrong about his worst fears once in a while?]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

The Only Way Is Down: Faller by Will McIntosh

At the start of Faller, the new SF novel by Will McIntosh, a man regains consciousness lying on a city street. He doesn’t remember his name, the name of the city, or how he got there. In fact, his mind is almost completely blank, just like all the other people who are waking up in complete confusion around him. What’s even stranger, the world appears to end a few city blocks from where the man woke up. Rather than more streets and buildings, there’s just a chasm looking out over empty sky, as if this fragment of a city was torn from a larger whole and then tossed into the air. This feels odd to the man, somehow, even though he has no recollection of what a city is supposed to look like.

The man finds three objects in his pockets: a toy soldier with a plastic parachute, a mysterious map drawn in blood (and since his finger is cut, he assumes he drew the map with his own blood, suggesting it must be important), and a photograph of himself with a woman he doesn’t recognize. Since clues are the only thing he has, and he doesn’t recall his name, he decides to go by the name Clue.

Eventually, inspired by the toy soldier in his pocket, Clue decides to construct a parachute. That’s how he discovers that the floating city fragment on which he regained consciousness isn’t the only one. Taking the new name Faller, he embarks on a quest to find the mysterious woman on the photograph…

[But wait, as they say in infomercials, there’s more!]

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: The Graveyard Game, Part 3

The Temporal Concordance for October 25, 2016 tells us that a new post in the Kage Baker Company Series Reread should appear on Tor.com today, and we all know history cannot be changed so… Here we go! In today’s post, we’ll go back to The Graveyard Game, covering the chapters set in 2142 and 2143, so from the end of last week’s post and ending on the chapter set in Regent’s Park.

As always, you can find the previous posts in the reread on our lovely index page. Also as always, please be aware that this reread contains spoilers for the entire series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

[Easily and Best Forgotten]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: The Graveyard Game, Part 2

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread! In this week’s post we’ll cover the section of The Graveyard Game that’s set in 2025 and 2026, so from the end of last week’s post to the end of the second Yorkshire chapter.

As always, you can find all previous posts in this reread on our wonderful index page. Also as always, please be aware that this reread contains spoilers for the entire series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

[Magna est veritas, et praevalebit.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: The Graveyard Game, Part 1

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread at Tor.com! Today, we’re getting started on one of my favorites in the entire series: The Graveyard Game.

Quick note on how we’ll divide this one up: Like Mendoza in Hollywood, The Graveyard Game doesn’t have numbered chapters. However, the novel is divided in five separate sections that are set anywhere from a few decades to over a century apart. The sections are also conveniently separated by the confessional “Joseph in the Darkness” mini-chapters. To make things as easy as possible, we’ll just cover one of those sections every week, beginning today with the one set in 1996, next week the one set in 2025/2026, and so on.

You can find all previous posts in the reread on our index page. Spoiler warning: this reread will contain spoilers for the entire Company series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

[Times had changed. Sooner or later, they always did.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Mendoza in Hollywood, Chapters 25-29

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series Reread! Can you believe we’re already finishing up another novel this week? In today’s post, we’ll cover the final five chapters of Mendoza in Hollywood, so from the end of last week’s post to the end of the novel. I’m not going to separate the commentary by chapter this time because this section focuses exclusively on Mendoza and Edward, rather than skipping around between the different characters and subplots.

All previous posts in the reread can be found on our handy-dandy index page. Important: please be aware that the reread will contain spoilers for the entire series, so be careful if you haven’t finished reading all the books yet!

The soundtrack for this week’s post should really be Joy Division’s She’s Lost Control, but since that’s hardly period-appropriate I’ll go back to El Amor Brujo, which makes a second appearance in this set of chapters.

[Everything would begin again, except sorrow.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Mendoza in Hollywood, Chapters 17-24

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread! In today’s post, we’ll cover “chapters” 17 through 24, which is from the end of last week’s post all the way to the end of Part Two: Babylon Is Fallen.

As always, you can find all previous posts in the reread on our index page. Also as always, ‘ware spoilers: this reread contains spoilers for the entire Company series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

For the soundtrack to today’s post, we’ll go back to the first edition of the Cahuenga Pass Film Festival with the score for the movie Greed, composed by William Axt. Enjoy!

[Is it not an honor to be descended from the noble Model T no less than from Adam?]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Mendoza in Hollywood, Chapters 12-16

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread! In today’s post we’ll cover “chapters” 12 through 16 of Mendoza in Hollywood, so from the beginning of ‘Part Two: Babylon is Falling” through the chapter ending on “Can’t you, senors?”

All previous posts in the reread can be found on our handy-dandy index page. Spoiler warning: this reread contains spoilers for the entire Company series, so be careful if you haven’t finished reading all the books yet!

The only possible choice for this week’s soundtrack has to be the score for the movie Intolerance. I’m a child of my age so I prefer the modern 1989 Carl Davis score over the original one by Joseph Carl Breil, but film purists would probably howl their disapproval so I’m including links to both. (Also, if you’re so inclined after reading my bit about Intolerance below, there’s some interesting material about the movie in general and the score in particular in this article.)

[Out of the cradle endlessly rocking]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Mendoza in Hollywood, Chapters 8-11

It’s Tuesday, and this is Tor.com, so it must be time for another installment of the Kage Baker Company Series reread! Whoop-whoop and other assorted expressions of enthusiasm! In today’s post, we’ll be covering “chapters” 8 through 11 of Mendoza in Hollywood, meaning from the end of the previous post right up to the end of Part One, “Establishing Shot”, meaning next week we’ll get started on Part Two, “Babylon is Fallen”. In my Avon Eos edition, the ending point for this week is page 155.

As always, you can find the previous posts in the reread on our nifty index page. Also as always, please be warned that this reread contains spoilers for the entire Company series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet!

The soundtrack to today’s post is the Miles Davis version of the Concierto de Aranjuez from “Sketches of Spain”. After all, what could be more appropriate for Mendoza in Hollywood than an American jazz interpretation of a Spanish classic? (Random music trivia: a song from El Amor Brujo, which was mentioned a few chapters back and which was the soundtrack to the previous post, was reinterpreted as “Will o’ the Wisp”, the track right after the Concierto de Aranjuez on that same Miles Davis record.)

[Only I am awake; only I can never sleep.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker

Rereading Kage Baker’s Company Series: Mendoza in Hollywood, Chapters 4-7

Welcome back to the Kage Baker Company Series reread! In today’s installment, we’ll cover “chapters” 4 through 7, so from the end of what we covered in last week’s post up to the end of the San Pedro trip, ending on “I’d have wrung the bird’s neck after the first hour.” (Pages 54 to 97 in my Avon Eos edition.)

As always, you can find all previous posts in the reread on our index page. Also, beware spoilers: this reread will discuss plot details up to and including the very end of the series, so be careful if you haven’t read all the books yet.

And with that, we’re off! For your rereading enjoyment, today’s suggested soundtrack is Manuel de Falla’s El Amor Brujo, briefly mentioned in chapter 4 of this novel.

[That world didn’t even exist yet, that innocent place, and it was already lost.]

Series: Rereading Kage Baker