A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade July 30, 2014 A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Proposed Trade-Offs for the Overhaul of the Barricade John Chu Fighting Turbulence requires sacrifices. The Colonel July 29, 2014 The Colonel Peter Watts The hives are sleeping giants. <em>To Eternity</em> July 24, 2014 To Eternity Wesley Allsbrook and Barrie Potter If all things were normal, Stuart would be considered quite a catch. Brisk Money July 23, 2014 Brisk Money Adam Christopher It's hard out there for a robotic detective.
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July 29, 2014
Introduction to the H. P. Lovecraft Reread
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July 25, 2014
Huge New Cast and Bloopers. Highlights from the San Diego Comic Con Game of Thrones Panel
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July 22, 2014
What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?
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July 22, 2014
Everything I Learned from the Buffy Rewatch
Alyx Dellamonica
July 21, 2014
If This is the Plot for Star Wars: Episode VII, I Will Be Sad
Emily Asher-Perrin
Showing posts by: Scott Allie click to see Scott Allie's profile
Tue
May 13 2014 3:30pm

Remembering H.R. Giger

H R Giger Alien

The visionary artist H.R. Giger passed away this week at age 74, days away from the 35th anniversary of the work he’ll probably be remembered for best, Ridley Scott’s 1979 film Alien.

After hearing the news this morning I hopped online to show my son Sid pictures of Giger’s creation, and talk about this strange man and his work. “Alien like in Aliens versus Predator?” he asked. I’m not ready to show my nine-year-old the movies, especially the first and best of them, but he’s seen pictures of the monster. Kelly Sue DeConnick’s son Henry, younger than Sid, has recently gotten obsessed with Giger’s creature, also without seeing any of the films. The creature really speaks for itself, and I bet it always will. Do we look at it differently now than we did in 1979? Sure. But we’re different. And we’re different, in part, because of what people like Giger put into the world.

[Read More]

Wed
Jul 11 2012 1:00pm

Getting Ready for San Diego Comic Con

How Comic Company Editors Prepare for San Diego Comic Con - Scott AllieThis is my twenty-first San Diego Comic Con, and I have got it somewhat down to a science: Schedule myself silly, including setting aside time to walk from one appointment to the next, to make sure no time is wasted during this very expensive weekend. So far I’ve only discovered one incident of double booking, so I’m doing quite well.

You could say that there’s nothing more grueling in the year of a comics professional than San Diego Comic Con, even though the show is about so many things other than comics.

[How the Senior Managing Editor of one of the biggest comic companies handles Comic Con]

Mon
Oct 31 2011 2:30pm

PC Cast and the House that The House of Night Built

Or, Where I Drove on My Kid’s Summer Vacation

This summer I took my longest road trip yet with my six-year-old son, Sid. I’d tried to rent a Prius, but after a side trip to Tate’s Comics in Lauderhill, Fla., I wound up driving a tank of a Lincoln from Kansas City to Portland, Ore., stopping along the way to see one of my heroes (now one of my freelancers), the legendary artist Richard Corben; the head of the national comics retailer organization ComicsPRO, Amanda Emmert; and international best-selling novelist PC Cast.

My VP of Marketing, Micha Hershman, who we stole from Borders a couple years ago (you’re welcome, B&N), had recommended PC and Kristin Cast’s work some time ago. When PC reached out through a friend, I was immediately into it.

[Read more]

Wed
Sep 28 2011 2:30pm

Lovecraftian Tradition Continues in Portland

Lovecraftian Tradition Continues in Portland...And not just the one about breeding with monsters.

I grew up in Lovecraft country, born in Salem, Mass. (Arkham) and reared in Ipswich (Innsmouth), before leaving New England for the greener (sometimes greyer) pastures of Portland, Oregon in 1991. Since 1995, I’ve been enjoying, and increasingly involved in, Portland’s HP Lovecraft Film Festival. I remember going with Mike Mignola the very first time, just catching a few short films. The Festival has grown quite a lot over the years, and I’ve grown more involved, providing some comics for the Festival newspaper The Daily Lurker, and speaking on panels about horror comics and film adaptations of printed work.

This year it was looking like it was not going to happen — Festival founder Andrew Migliore had to focus on other things, so while some friends organized a fest in LA, Portland was going to have to go without.

[But you can’t keep Cthulhu down]

Thu
Jul 14 2011 1:34pm

Jane Espenson Doesn’t Write Television, It Creates Itself Around Her

Today is the birthday of Jane Espenson, writer of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Torchwood, Warehouse 13, Dollhouse, Game of Thrones, Dinosaurs, Andy Barker PI, Caprica, Tru Calling, Gilmore Girls, The Inside, The OC, Firefly, Something So Right, Deep Space Nine, Ellen, and Nowhere Man. If you’re on this site and you haven’t seen a few of Jane’s shows, you probably don’t watch TV. Good for you. She’s also written a pile of comics, to my great delight....

[How to celebrate Jane Espenson’s birthday]

Fri
Jun 24 2011 11:10am

Remembering Gene Colan

The great comics legend Gene Colan passed away yesterday at the age of 84, just days after the anniversary of his wife Adrienne’s death. I hesitate to eulogize him, afraid it’ll look like I’m trying to hitch myself to Gene’s legend, to validate myself in his shadow. I just want to use up a little corner of the internet, maybe take a few minutes of some readers’ time, to add to the sentiment of love and tribute to this amazing talent. 

In the 1990s I was bored with most of what was coming out in comics, so instead of walking away from the shop empty-handed every Wednesday, I put my money toward reading old stories. Gene’s phenomenal run on Tomb of Dracula, with writer Marv Wolfman, wasn’t yet available in a collected form, but this was when you could find back issues pretty reliably. I got the first three issues of Tomb of Dracula one Wednesday, and for the next couple months, every week’s trip to the comic shop meant another few issues of the greatest horror series of the 1970s. The story and art were so good my appetite increased, more comics per trip, more trips per week. If my regular store, Excalibur Books and Comics on Portland’s Hawthorne Blvd., didn’t have a particular issue—a rare hurdle—I’d run to Future Dreams, or Things from Another World, and seldom had to go farther than that.

[Read more]

Thu
Jun 23 2011 4:58pm

A Very Bruce Campbell Birthday in Portland

Portland is one of the more interesting place to live in this country, especially if you’re into the genre stuff that gets lumped into geek culture. My girlfriend runs a biweekly event called Geek Trivia, held at an old school that’s been converted into a microbrewery and a movie theater. Prizes include a trip to San Diego Comic Con. Portlanders mean it when it comes to getting your geek on.

[The celebration of Bruce Campbell’s birthday you missed!]