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Showing posts by: Sam Weber click to see Sam Weber's profile
Thu
Feb 3 2011 12:08pm

Joker and Iconoclast

Joker and Iconoclast by Sam Weber

Although there are many highlights in what is consistently an entertaining show, the season two’s “Pop Goes The Joker” is without a doubt my favorite moment in Adam West-era Batman. As a kid, anything about art interested me… and in the post-Batman Returns fever of the early nineties, anything involving Batman was even better.

Perhaps my favorite thing about the show, however little I realized it at the time, was the lighthearted glimpse it offered us into the 1960s. For all of its camp and saccharine dialogue, the series has always existed for me as an artifact of a time and place that I have only ever known through books or television.



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Wed
Jan 19 2011 11:49am

Sam Weber on the ebook cover for Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn Trilogy

Mistborn Trilogy ebook art by Sam Weber

It’s a challenge to distill an entire trilogy, especially one as good as Mistborn, into a single picture. No idea seems to do the content justice, and every sketch can feel like a compromise. I can recall reading the novels and thinking naively how easy it was going to be to come up with a cover. Sanderson, after all, seems to write like a picture maker, with description and language that suggests more than a casual familiarity with the visual arts. He even writes from an artist’s point of view, quite convincingly I might add, in his recent novel The Way of Kings. To a pictorially oriented person like myself, the effect is palpable, each chapter begs to be illustrated. And in Mistborn everything, both alien and ordinary, is brought to life effortlessly, the fantastic envisioned with the precision and clarity of the familiar and the mundane made wonderful as if seen for the first time.

[Full art after the cut]