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Showing posts by: Pamela Dean click to see Pamela Dean's profile
Sat
Aug 14 2010 10:00am

Some responses to the opening posts of the Heinlein discussion

I’ve just gotten back from Duluth. My intention was to keep up with discussion in the evenings, but torrential downpours on some days combined with losing the car key on the beach and having to get a locksmith out to make a new one in the middle of Wisconsin Point, surrounded by biting flies, pretty much ate up the evenings.

Instead of posting comments in discussions that may be winding down, I’m going to make a couple of posts of my reactions. I’ve included links in case anybody wants to reread the posts I’m responding to.

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Wed
Aug 11 2010 4:45pm

Tomorrow Through the Past

Reading biographies always makes me nostalgic, and I am going to be out of town for the first couple of days of this discussion, so I thought I’d just get the nostalgia out of my system in one fell ignorable swoop, rather than attempting to be profound while wondering where the insect repellent is and why I still don’t have my own suitcase.

I first read Heinlein when I was very young. I don’t remember my first Heinlein novel as I remember my first Norton, but since the reverberations of “Wow, I sure was a naïve kid” seem strongest when I reread Red Planet, it may have been that one. I remember wishing there was more about Jim’s sister Phyllis in that book. She seemed just as interesting as Jim. I liked Meade in The Rolling Stones too, but I didn’t want to be her because she seemed to be saddled with an inordinate amount of babysitting and cooking. I adored Hazel Meade Stone, but I didn’t think I could be like her, because she was an engineer, though she’d quit being one because she had hit the glass ceiling and got fed up.

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