The Hell of It February 25, 2015 The Hell of It Peter Orullian What will he wager? Schrödinger’s Gun February 18, 2015 Schrödinger’s Gun Ray Wood Maybe in some other timeline it would have gone smooth. Acrobatic Duality February 11, 2015 Acrobatic Duality Tamara Vardomskaya The two of her are perfectly synchronized. The Language of Knives February 4, 2015 The Language of Knives Haralambi Markov They share the rites of death, and grief.
From The Blog
March 2, 2015
A Ranking of 1980s Fantasy That Would Please Crom Himself!
Leah Schnelbach
February 27, 2015
Goodbye, Mr. Nimoy — What Spock Meant to One Geeky 12-Year-Old Girl
Emily Asher-Perrin
February 26, 2015
Introducing the Star Trek The Original Series Rewatch
Keith DeCandido
February 23, 2015
Oh No, She Didn’t: The Strong Female Character, Deconstructed
Ilana C. Myer
February 20, 2015
Evil Eighties: The Paperback Horrors of Lisa Tuttle
Grady Hendrix
Showing posts by: Moshe Feder click to see Moshe Feder's profile
Tue
Jul 22 2008 8:03pm

Handicapping the Hugos

Once upon a time I was a book reviewer for Publishers Weekly. Although my name wasn't on the reviews, the fact that they appeared in PW made me one of the most influential SF/fantasy reviewers in the world. I wasn't a big fan of the weekly deadlines, but I did have lots of fun getting the first word in on a wide variety of important SF and fantasy. One of the side effects was that I was as au courant with the field as I've ever been, and probably ever will be.

That meant that when Hugo nomination time came around, I already knew what I wanted to nominate; and when it was time to vote, I'd already read all the nominees.

Nowadays, being busy trying to find and publish future Hugo winners of my own, I just can't keep up. Every year this century I've sworn I would take a week off and read all the nominees -- the ceremony is much more fun if you've voted and have a rooting interest -- and every year I haven't managed it. (To my mind, people who vote without reading the nominees are beneath contempt.)

This year was no exception.

So I'm going to take advantage of the shiny new soap box provided by Tor.com to find out what I've been missing.

Here's a list of the Hugo nominees for best novel:

* The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon (HarperCollins; Fourth Estate)
* Brasyl by Ian McDonald (Gollancz; Pyr)
* Rollback by Robert J. Sawyer (Tor; Analog Oct. 2006-Jan./Feb. 2007)
* The Last Colony by John Scalzi (Tor)
* Halting State by Charles Stross (Ace)

The only one of these I've read is Michael Chabon's book, which I loved (and which, to my pleasant surprise, won the Nebula). So I'd like you to tell me which one you think should win (and why) and which one you think will win. (Alas, you can't influence my uncast vote, since the voting deadline was back on July 7th.)

I'm sure the results will be enlightening, and I look forward to seeing what you have to say. (No extra credit for picking a Tor book!)

[2005 Hugo Award image from Wikipedia Commons; reproducible for any purpose.]

Sun
Jul 20 2008 6:17am

Ecce Fanno

It’s hot here in New York in the summer. Hot and sticky, as if the air were filled with invisible cobwebs of cotton candy. Hence the seasonal mantra of the New York City weatherman, translated from the sticky Latin of our municipal motto, “Hazy, hot, and humid.” 

My daily fanSo I carry a fan. At the moment, it’s a relatively nice painted wooden one that’s far more effective and more durable than the cheap paper ones I used to get. I use it primarily when riding the bus and the subway. Both modes of transit are reliably air conditioned these days, but the fan amplifies the A/C’s effectiveness by assisting in the rapid evaporation of sweat, of which I produce more than I used to, thanks to a medication I’m on. The other passengers look at me oddly at first and eventually enviously, but I’m only rarely asked where to get a fan, and I never see anyone else using one. Do other people fear to resemble a southern belle or a Chinese mandarin? It doesn’t bother me, I’d rather be cool.

That pretty much sums up the traditional science fiction type: careless of convention and more than happy to look eccentric to achieve a practical advantage. 

Perhaps it’s not true anymore, but for decades there really was such a science fiction type, and not only among the genre’s readers. For people of that type (originally men, but eventually women, too) were overwhelmingly its writers, artists, and editors.

 [click on "Read more..." to uh, read more!]