The Shape of My Name March 4, 2015 The Shape of My Name Nino Cipri How far can you travel to claim yourself? The Hell of It February 25, 2015 The Hell of It Peter Orullian What will he wager? Schrödinger’s Gun February 18, 2015 Schrödinger’s Gun Ray Wood Maybe in some other timeline it would have gone smooth. Acrobatic Duality February 11, 2015 Acrobatic Duality Tamara Vardomskaya The two of her are perfectly synchronized.
From The Blog
March 4, 2015
Writing Women Characters as Human Beings
Kate Elliott
March 2, 2015
A Ranking of 1980s Fantasy That Would Please Crom Himself!
Leah Schnelbach
February 27, 2015
Goodbye, Mr. Nimoy — What Spock Meant to One Geeky 12-Year-Old Girl
Emily Asher-Perrin
February 26, 2015
Introducing the Star Trek The Original Series Rewatch
Keith DeCandido
February 23, 2015
Oh No, She Didn’t: The Strong Female Character, Deconstructed
Ilana C. Myer
Showing posts by: Mignon Fogarty click to see Mignon Fogarty's profile
Tue
Aug 27 2013 8:00am

Apostrophes in Science Fiction and Fantasy Names

J'onn J'onzz Martian Manhunter Apostrophes

In honor of International Apostrophe Day, August 16, we’re going to talk about apostrophes in science fiction and fantasy names. Why do authors think apostrophes make characters seem exotic? Who started it? And why do some people find it annoying?

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Thu
Jun 21 2012 10:00am

Write Like a Metamorph

You know how teachers tell writers to “consider the audience” and business trainers tell writers to think about “what’s appropriate for a given writing situation”? Well, it occurred to me the other day that what this all means is that good writers need to be more like empathic metamorphs.

Metamorphs, as featured in the Star Trek (TNG) episode “The Perfect Mate,” are empathic beings who live to please others and become the perfect mate by knowing exactly what their partners want.

In Star Trek, the allure of the metamorph is about sex and romance, of course, but if you apply the same concepts to writing, it can be about safety.

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