A Long Spoon December 18, 2014 A Long Spoon Jonathan L. Howard A Johannes Cabal story. Burnt Sugar December 10, 2014 Burnt Sugar Lish McBride Everyone knows about gingerbread houses. Father Christmas: A Wonder Tale of the North December 9, 2014 Father Christmas: A Wonder Tale of the North Charles Vess Happy Holidays from Tor.com Skin in the Game December 3, 2014 Skin in the Game Sabrina Vourvoulias Some monsters learn how to pass.
From The Blog
December 9, 2014
The Eleventh Doctor’s Legacy Was Loss and Failure
Emily Asher-Perrin
December 9, 2014
Tor.com Reviewers’ Choice: The Best Books of 2014
Tor.com
December 8, 2014
How Fast is the Millennium Falcon? A Thought Experiment.
Chris Lough
December 8, 2014
Tiamat’s Terrain: Tales of the Marvellous and News of the Strange
Alex Mangles
December 4, 2014
Potential Spoiler Leak for Star Wars: The Force Awakens Reveals Awesome Details
Emily Asher-Perrin
Showing posts by: Kevin K. Birth click to see Kevin K. Birth's profile
Tue
Sep 25 2012 11:00am

Alas For Time Travel: The Leap Second Stands In Its Way

Alas For Time Travel: The Leap Second Stands In Its WayWhen one considers time travel, it is wise to become aware of a set of agencies and policies that are responsible for keeping our clocks on time, and of the consequences of their policies for surfing the chronoscape. A small policy change can cause all sorts of problems.

The current system that ensures that clocks run on time involves coordination between the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), and the Radiocommuncation Sector of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU-R). The IERS charts the Earth’s movements, the BIPM takes signals from atomic clocks distributed around the globe in order to define a precise clock time, and the ITU-R sets policies and standards. Right now these institutions are engaged in the debate over the future of the leap second.

[Woe to time travelers: imagining a future without the leap second]