A Cup of Salt Tears August 27, 2014 A Cup of Salt Tears Isabel Yap They say women in grief are beautiful. Strongest Conjuration August 26, 2014 Strongest Conjuration Skyler White A story of the Incrementalists. Seven Commentaries on an Imperfect Land August 20, 2014 Seven Commentaries on an Imperfect Land Ruthanna Emrys Stories of Tikanu. Hero of the Five Points August 19, 2014 Hero of the Five Points Alan Gratz A League of Seven story.
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Showing posts by: Jen Vaughn click to see Jen Vaughn's profile
Wed
Nov 23 2011 5:00pm

Let’s Not Visit The Planet That Perpetually Lets You Down. 100 Planets by Daniel Merlin Goodbrey

100 Strips. 100 Mondays. This 100 word review of 100 Planets.

Englishman Daniel Merlin Goodbrey contemplates the planets we have yet to find, those we have found and those we wish to forget. Strips are formatted beautifully — not in lined panels but on the face of the damn planet itself with the trail of a rocketship leading you in the correct reading direction. (This is important in the Planet that [Perpetually] Lets You Down). The strip is not hung up on continuity, other than the conventions of the planet shaped panels, and one strip may occasionally wink to another. Even the characters have round, planet shaped heads!

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Fri
Nov 11 2011 4:00pm

Friends With Boys, a Webcomic by Faith Erin Hicks

Your first day of school. Do you remember it? I know I do because I wore a strawberry dress with black biking shorts and slouch boots. I was five. In Friends With Boys, Maggie is wearing loose-fitting jeans and plaid shirt. She is (probably) 14 and entering public high school after years of being home-schooled.

It only takes until a few pages to encounter the first problem. Maggie, our precocious freshman, is the only daughter in a family with three brothers and a police chief father, but Maggie’s mother left the family to celebrate no longer having to home-school any children. Our heroine is strong though, taking the first walk to school by herself, through a graveyard no less and sporting tiny pigtails that can be repeatedly mistaken for Sailor Moon-esque ondongos.

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