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Showing posts by: JA Pitts click to see JA Pitts's profile
Thu
Jun 21 2012 11:30am

J.A. Pitts & A.M. Dellamonica Talk Dragons, Volcanoes, and the Loss Behind Coming Out

J.A. Pitts & A.M. Dellamonica Talk Dragons, Volcanoes, and the Loss Behind Coming OutAs a tie-in to this month’s Queering SFF Pride posts on Tor.com, A.M. Dellamonica and J.A. Pitts, the authors of Blue Magic and Forged in Fire respectively, interviewed each other about the personal choices that determined the narratives of their books.

The discussion covers a range of emotion, from the joy of being able to romp with dragons, swords, and volcanoes to the surprisingly huge sense of personal loss that accompanies coming out to those you love.

And that’s just the beginning. Read their interview below and catch them this Saturday at Borderlands Books in San Francisco on June 23rd at 3:00 p.m.

A.M. Dellamonica: The thing that’s piqued my curiosity at this particular moment might be a question you’ve answered a thousand times: why Norse mythology? How did it come to be that Valkyrie and dragons and the children of Odin fit best with a leather-wearing blacksmithing lesbian heroine?

[Read more]

Wed
Oct 26 2011 5:00pm

The Quiet Sense of Foreboding That is Norse Mythology

A few years ago, when I was working up the basic story line for my new series which begins with Black Blade Blues, I wanted to do something different from the other urban fantasy I’d been reading. How could I stand out in the crowd? What I needed was to work with a mythos with that was under-represented in the field.

I’ve always been fascinated with mythos and religion. I remember reading Edith Hamilton’s Mythology as a kid and finding every bit of it fascinating. I especially loved how for the longest time, we as a species had gods that looked and acted just like us. I went through different phases of favorite mythos. They each had an appeal. Norse mythology, however, stuck with me as I began to think toward my own stories.

[Keeping wolves at bay. Not metaphorically]