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Showing posts by: Faceout Books click to see Faceout Books's profile
Thu
Sep 16 2010 3:49pm

Carl Rush on the Hitchhiker’s Guide 30th Anniversary Redesign

To celebrate last October’s 30th anniversary of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, publisher Pan Macmillan commissed a series of striking new covers for the series. Below, Charles from Faceout Books interviews Carl Rush, the art director behind the new design. This post originally appeared on Faceout Books. Visit them for many more great images!

Faceout Books (Charles Brock): I was blown away when I first saw this series. So much fun. I need to track down a set of these. Amazing work by Crush Creative. Thank you Carl for taking time to share your process. Truly inspiring work. How did you become a book designer?

Carl Rush: My background in design started working for the music industry designing record covers. When I set Crush up eleven years ago this was the area I worked in mostly, but after about two years the record companies started to struggle and the days of decent budgets for designers in the music industry was over. I’m sure there are a few jobs still around, but at the time I couldn’t risk sticking to what I knew... It was time to look for other avenues of work. In 2002, I had a lucky break and won a big project for Heineken in Amsterdam. This job lasted for for four years and paid all the bills. Because I had regular work which paid well it meant I could take on some smaller (less well paid) interesting jobs. This took the form of book cover design.

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