Brisk Money July 23, 2014 Brisk Money Adam Christopher It's hard out there for a robotic detective. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, or, When You Wish Upon A Star July 20, 2014 A Short History of the Twentieth Century, or, When You Wish Upon A Star Kathleen Ann Goonan A rocket story. The Angelus Guns July 16, 2014 The Angelus Guns Max Gladstone There's a war in heaven, outside of time. Sleep Walking Now and Then July 9, 2014 Sleep Walking Now and Then Richard Bowes A tragedy in three acts.
From The Blog
July 18, 2014
Summer 2014 Anime Preview: In the Name of the Moon!
Kelly Quinn
July 16, 2014
Picturing Dragons
Irene Gallo
July 15, 2014
Who Should Play The Magicians?
Ryan Britt
July 14, 2014
A Long Overdue Nod to SciFi and Fantasy’s Best Librarians
Stubby the Rocket
July 11, 2014
For Love or Money (And If You Do It Right, BOTH): Choosing a Career in Art
Greg Ruth
Showing posts by: Eric Raab click to see Eric Raab's profile
Mon
Feb 22 2010 5:07pm

The Present of Genius

Micheal Moorcock

A Celebration of Michael Moorcock
The Godfather of Steampunk

Michael Moorcock is one of my favorite writers of all-time, so it’s (for lack of a better term) a dream come true to be working with him in any capacity. For the past forty years he’s left an undeniable stamp on storytelling. I have the honor of re-issuing Moorcock’s Dorian Hawkmoon Quartet this year and I wanted to take the first book’s publication as an opportunity to let as many people out there know (who don’t) how much Moorcock means to the world of storytelling. I’m not alone in singing his praises, far from it. 

Over the next month here on Tor.com we will hear from many who cite Moorcock as an influence, friend, and without a doubt one of the greatest fantasists of all time, including Neil Gaiman, Tad Williams, and even some words from Moorcock himself. We hope to give a new generation some insight into who the authors they love read to get their imaginations charged.

To compliment the posts and conversations we will be showcasing excerpts and art from Tor’s new edition of his 1967 novel The Jewel in the Skull, Book One of the Dorian Hawkmoon Quartet (the other three—The Mad God’s Amulet, The Sword of Dawn and The Runestaff—will be released throughout 2010). Each excerpt will be accompanied by a new visual imagining by Vance Kovacs. But rejoice. It doesn’t end here. Besides a backlist worth combing completely, Moorcock is currently working on new trilogy that Tor will launch next year.

If you have never read Michael Moorock consider it a gift to you, indulge. If you have, react, chime in. It’s a celebration.


Eric Raab is an editor at Tor Books

Sun
Nov 16 2008 2:59pm

While You Do That, He’s Doing This: My Quantum of Solace

Ok. So everyone has their opinions about what a Bond movie should be. Pulpy, Action(y), Sexy, Flashy, Techy, Kitschy, whatever. That’s the great thing about the Bond franchise. Everyone can find a piece to savor, and the overall meal is for the most part nourishing.

I went into Quantum of Solace knowing that the franchise was heading far away from the Goldfingerin’, Thunderballin’, Moonrakin’ juice to a more consumer friendly, hyperrealistic Bourne-like espionage/action hybrid, and well, I don’t blame them really. I went to the theater at 12:30 PM on Friday and the place was packed. The night shows were all pre-sold out. That means the franchise will live on . . . and I will probably be there everytime. . . and everyone is getting paid.

But we all have opinions, right. We all want to play director (at least I do). I have come to expect certain things out of Bond film, and while Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace both get a thumbs up from me as grade-A action movies, there is still tons missing that always, well, made Bond Bond. I would have done it differently. The whole relaunch.

[So using my illustrious Bond criteria above, my version of Quantum of Solace would be injected with the following]