Dog March 25, 2015 Dog Bruce McAllister "Watch the dogs when you're down there, David." The Museum and the Music Box March 18, 2015 The Museum and the Music Box Noah Keller History is rotting away, just like the museum. The Thyme Fiend March 11, 2015 The Thyme Fiend Jeffrey Ford It's not all in his head. The Shape of My Name March 4, 2015 The Shape of My Name Nino Cipri How far can you travel to claim yourself?
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Showing posts by: Charles Ardai click to see Charles Ardai's profile
Mon
Mar 8 2010 5:42pm

“Naked Girls Reading” Tackles SF

Back in October, Steven Padnick blogged about a saucy series of literary events out of Chicago that was in the process of spawning offshoots in other cities around the country: Naked Girls Reading, in which a panel of skyclad female readers tackled thematically linked works for an audience of interested auditors. Early evenings in the run included “Naked Girls Reading Banned Books,” “Naked Girls Reading the Constitution,” and “Naked Girls Reading Poetry.”  

This past week, the New York branch, led by burlesque performer and self-described geek Nasty Canasta, devoted two nights to “Naked Girls Reading Science Fiction.” 

[What was read, and by whom?  Click to find out.]

Fri
Mar 5 2010 6:31pm

Pulp Lives, Again (But For How Long?)

When Max Phillips and I sat down over sushi and plum wine in the winter of 2001 and came up with the idea for Hard Case Crime, it was not with the intention of becoming the new godfathers of pulp fiction—or the midwives of a pulp rebirth.

We’d just noticed that it had been a while since we’d seen any old-fashioned, pulp-styled paperback novels in bookstores and we missed them. 

So we decided to create some our own. We figured maybe we’d find some publisher willing to bring out five or six of the things, and that would be the end of it. Sixty-three books later, Hard Case Crime is (to my amazement) still trundling along, turning out lurid editions of novels old and new. And in the years since we published our first titles we’ve seen any number of other publishers dip a toe in the pulp waters as well.  

[Examples, and more musings, after the jump.]