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Showing posts by: Alyson Noël click to see Alyson Noël's profile
Mon
Jun 6 2011 3:03pm

Dead on Arrival

So the last time I posted here at Tor.com, I wrote about my love of hands-on research. And while I considered writing about other parts of my writing process this time around, as it turns out, it’s not very interesting. Which is why I figured I’d write about research again.

In fact, my process can pretty much be summed up by saying that after creating a brief outline using both the Blake Snyder Beat Sheet (found in his book, Save the Cat), and the concepts I learned in Robert McKee’s book, Story—I write, revise, write some more, revise some more—and basically continue with this routine until the deadline rolls around and it’s time to send the book to my editor.

That’s it. Simple. Utilitarian. Boring.

[But research is different]

Wed
Jun 1 2011 10:35am

Smells Like Teen Spirits

Everlasting by Alyson Noel(With apologies to Kurt Cobain.)

When I first started writing professionally, I’d just come off over a decade working as a flight attendant—a job where my life was ruled by strictly enforced dress code guidelines and early morning wake up calls. Which is probably why I assumed that after seeing my books on the shelves, my second favorite part of the gig would be a tie between my writer’s uniform of sweatpants, a T-shirt, and slippers—and the office hours of whenever to whenever.

So color me surprised when research trumped all.

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