Selfies September 17, 2014 Selfies Lavie Tidhar Smile for the camera. When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami September 16, 2014 When Gods and Vampires Roamed Miami Kendare Blake A Goddess Wars story As Good As New September 10, 2014 As Good As New Charlie Jane Anders She has three chances to save the world. Tuckitor’s Last Swim September 9, 2014 Tuckitor’s Last Swim Edith Cohn A hurricane is coming.
From The Blog
September 18, 2014
Cast As Thou Wilt: Kushiel’s Dart Dream Cast
Natalie Zutter
September 17, 2014
How Goldfinger Bound Sci-Fi to James Bond
Ryan Britt
September 15, 2014
Rereading the Empire Trilogy: Servant of the Empire, Part 1
Tansy Rayner Roberts
September 13, 2014
If You Want a Monster to Hunt, You’ll Get It. Doctor Who: “Listen”
Chris Lough
September 11, 2014
The Ghostbusters are an Antidote to Lovecraft’s Dismal Worldview
Max Gladstone
Showing posts by: Ali Fisher click to see Ali Fisher's profile
Tue
Oct 16 2012 1:00pm

You Can Go Ahead and Touch This Book is Full of Spiders

 A review of This Book is Full of Spiders by David Wong / Jason ParginDavid Wong (pseudonym of author and Cracked.com senior editor Jason Pargin) is back in action on another brilliant and ridiculous adventure in an undisclosed American small town that’s infested with scary, scary things. This Book is Full of Spiders. Seriously, Dude, Don’t Touch It is the hilarious, twisted, and heartfelt follow-up to the cult classic John Dies at the End. Both novels follow David and John; a couple of twenty-something college dropouts working at a video rental store by day, and battling inter-dimensional monsters by night. This time around, the monsters are a wild horde of parasitic spider-like fiends sometimes called “spider creatures,” sometimes “spiders,” sometimes “those f*cking spider monsters.”

[Read more]

Tue
Aug 7 2012 12:30pm

Tracy K. Smith Explores the Universe Through Poetry in Life on Mars

If your brain is anything like my brain then the part of your brain reserved for thinking about outer space is a mess. It’s probably cluttered with things like the moon landing footage, pics from Curiosity, clips from
Farscape, the cover of The Little Prince, that Smashing Pumpkins music video, and so on. On top of all that, looking up at a sky full of stars prompts all of the big questions: Why are we here? Why is everything in the
universe moving away from everything else at a constantly increasing pace?
And why won’t astronomers acknowledge Pluto as a planet when I know it’s
one in my heart?

Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith doesn’t have answers. She
doesn’t try to reconcile the messes in our heads. In Life on Mars she celebrates our confusing, question-riddled relationship with the universe.

[Read more]