Sleep Walking Now and Then July 9, 2014 Sleep Walking Now and Then Richard Bowes A tragedy in three acts. The Devil in the Details July 2, 2014 The Devil in the Details Debra Doyle and James D. Macdonald A Peter Crossman adventure. Little Knife June 26, 2014 Little Knife Leigh Bardugo A Ravkan folk tale. The Color of Paradox June 25, 2014 The Color of Paradox A.M. Dellamonica Ruin, spoil, or if necessary kill.
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Showing posts by: Alan Gratz click to see Alan Gratz's profile
Fri
Nov 15 2013 12:00pm

Cover reveal for Alan Gratz’s The League of Seven

The League of Seven Alan Gratz Brett Helquist cover

Don’t judge a book by its cover.

That’s what people say, right? But we all do it. You’re in the bookstore, or the library, and you’ve got dozens—hundreds—of choices. Which book do you pick up first?

The one with the most intriguing cover, of course.

Then you read the back. If you like what you read there, you maybe read the flap copy. If that pulls you in, you read the first page. Maybe the first chapter. And somewhere along the way it’s the story, the writing, that makes you buy the book or check it out.

But it’s that cover that makes you pick it up in the first place.

[Read More]

Fri
Nov 16 2012 1:30pm

Skyfall Proves that James Bond is a Time Lord

Skyfall Proves that James Bond is a Time Lord

I saw Skyfall last night, and after breaking it down, I can come to only one conclusion: this is the Bond film in which it is revealed that James Bond is a Time Lord.

Bear with me here.

In high school, my friends and I had a pet theory that James Bond wasn’t one man, but many. “James Bond” was a secret agent “work name” that was assigned to someone new whenever the old agent bearing the name was retired. (Dead or alive.) This theory is nothing revolutionary—I’ve come across a number of people over the years who came up with a similar idea to retcon some sense of continuity to a series that spans now fifty years and six different actors in the role. (And far more writers.) Each generation has its own Bond, we decided, but it’s a different person fulfilling the role each time—not just on screen, but in the world of the movie.

[From Gallifrey with Love.]