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Showing posts by: Adam Nevill click to see Adam Nevill's profile
Wed
Jun 5 2013 2:00pm

Phrenological Chart

One of the most important developments while becoming a writer is the cultivation of an inner reader. Within every writer there needs to be a reliable inner reader, and the latter requires autonomy and independence from the creative writer; an inner reader should be immune to being fooled, bribed, intimidated, or coerced by the exhausted or wishful-thinking writer half of the team. Essentially an inner reader is an objective editor. Some psychiatrists now believe we are all, to some degree, constructed from multiple selves, each having a specific role in a specific situation. An inner reader, I sometimes think, can be one of these specialist detached ‘selves’ inside a writer.

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Fri
Oct 26 2012 12:30pm

Homage to Horror: A Discussion of James HerbertThere was a time when one writer more than any other seemed to capture the darker side of the imaginations of a generation of young male readers, and on a vast scale too. A writer that dealt with the taboo, pushed boundaries, felt dangerous to read, was scorned by the consensus of literary respectability, but whose name was a byword for action, thrills, and sensational storytelling.

In previous decades occult horror writer Dennis Wheatley, and military action writer Sven Hassel, who wrote of the explicit adventures of an SS penal regiment, occupied this mantle and became the biggest selling authors of their respective eras. Their novels were hidden in school desks and their names carried a unique charge of static electricity and excitement.

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