Sleep Walking Now and Then July 9, 2014 Sleep Walking Now and Then Richard Bowes A tragedy in three acts. The Devil in the Details July 2, 2014 The Devil in the Details Debra Doyle and James D. Macdonald A Peter Crossman adventure. Little Knife June 26, 2014 Little Knife Leigh Bardugo A Ravkan folk tale. The Color of Paradox June 25, 2014 The Color of Paradox A.M. Dellamonica Ruin, spoil, or if necessary kill.
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Showing posts tagged: transformation click to see more stuff tagged with transformation
Thu
Apr 8 2010 11:41am

Rockets in Fairyland: The Yellow Knight of Oz

Yellow Knight of Oz cover“I must have mud and you must have adventure. Oh why,” wailed Ploppa, with a smothered sob, “cannot people who like each other like the same things?”

In The Yellow Knight of Oz, Ruth Plumly Thompson produced one of her most jumbled, yet most delightful, books, a mix of mud, Arthurian knights, irritated underground dwellers, trees melting into people, and science fiction. The result should not make any sense, and yet it does, creating an often moving tale of how, even in the best and most magical of fairylands, you may not always get the life you wished for.

The story begins in the Emerald City, where the gentle Sir Hokus is troubled. Not because, as you might be thinking, he has finally realized that no matter how many times her country is threatened or outright invaded, Ozma will never set up a security system or even the simplest of defense plans, but because he has never, in his entire and near endless life, completed a quest. He decides to go on one, despite not knowing what he might be questing for. The girls of the Emerald City are delighted at the thought—they regard it as sort of a picnic—and scoff at any suggestion that they should be working on embroidery instead:

“How stuffy!” sniffed Bettsy Bobbin, sliding carefully into his lap, which his armor made rather hard and uncomfortable. “How old-fashioned. Now don’t be quaint! What fun is it watching from a tower? And this embroidery and so on that you talk about ruins the eyes, and you know it!”

Despite this speech, Sir Hokus evades his friends, striking out across Oz on his own. Meanwhile, a young boy from Long Island, called Speedy, is heading to Oz—via rocket.  Rocket!

[Everyone should travel to Oz like this!]

Thu
Jan 7 2010 1:00pm

Transformations in Fairyland: The Tin Woodman of Oz

If we know one thing about The Tin Woodman of Oz, it’s that he has a heart.  A heart carefully chosen by the Wizard of Oz himself. The very kindest and tenderest of hearts, so kind and so tender that the Tin Woodman even goes so far as to protect the very insects of his kingdom from physical pain. The very best of hearts—

But what if we’re wrong?

[Apparently, we’re wrong.]

Thu
Oct 15 2009 1:00pm

Oz Revolts! - The Marvelous Land of Oz

Buoyed by the unexpected success of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and brimming with hopes for additional revenue from stage and other adaptations, Baum rushed merrily into writing a sequel, The Marvelous Land of Oz. The result is one of the most seamless of the Oz books, with few of the digressions that litter the other books, and a rollicking farce.

And also, a rather problematic book for feminists. But we’ll get to that.

[Women! Revolution! Mice! and Woggle-Bugs!]