A Long Spoon December 18, 2014 A Long Spoon Jonathan L. Howard A Johannes Cabal story. Burnt Sugar December 10, 2014 Burnt Sugar Lish McBride Everyone knows about gingerbread houses. Father Christmas: A Wonder Tale of the North December 9, 2014 Father Christmas: A Wonder Tale of the North Charles Vess Happy Holidays from Tor.com Skin in the Game December 3, 2014 Skin in the Game Sabrina Vourvoulias Some monsters learn how to pass.
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Tiamat’s Terrain: Tales of the Marvellous and News of the Strange
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Potential Spoiler Leak for Star Wars: The Force Awakens Reveals Awesome Details
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Showing posts tagged: illustration click to see more stuff tagged with illustration
Thu
Nov 18 2010 11:39am

Weird Wizard of Oz

Spectrum 17Spectrum 17, the premiere annual showcasing the best of science fiction and fantasy art of the year, is out and it’s my good fortune to have painted the cover image. Especially on a nice white background. (Thanks, Arnie!) I’m a fan of white backgrounds. Probably an influence from the Saturday Evening Post and a decade of the best paperback covers in the world.

[A breakdown of the cover after the cut]

Wed
Nov 17 2010 5:15pm

For Those About to Rock, Part 3

Since the shift in pop music from classical, to jazz to rock and roll, science fiction and fantasy imagery has been a mainstay in album cover art. From some of the smallest and biggest names in illustration, art and music history. In no particular order over the course of this week, I’ll be collecting some of the most notable science fiction and fantasy images ever created. Check out Part 1, Part 2, and Part 4.

[Gallery below the cut. Mildly NSFW]

Tue
Nov 16 2010 3:04pm

For Those About to Rock, Part 2

Since the shift in pop music from classical, to jazz to rock and roll, science fiction and fantasy imagery has been a mainstay in album cover art. From some of the smallest and biggest names in illustration, art and music history. In no particular order over the course of this week, I’ll be collecting some of the most notable science fiction and fantasy images ever created. Check out Part 1, Part 3, and Part 4.

[Read more]

Tue
Nov 16 2010 2:18pm

Whitechapel Steampunks The Batman and it is Awesome

Le Magnifique Bat Man by Michael NelsenWarren Ellis regularly throws out remake/remodel challenges to the talent gathered on the Whitechapel forum, and this latest one is turning into quite a doozy: Steampunk Batman.

From Ellis's explanatory text:

Immerse yourself in the era of Steampunk, and the coal-fired industrial nightmare of Gotham, where is set the popular silent films concerning The Batman. Or even The Bat-Man, if you prefer.

[...]

Your task is to design a poster, suitable for placement outside a cinematheque or other theatre, regarding one of these films. There are several in the series I have not mentioned, and you are of course free to make those up. I mean, use them wisely.

The creation above, by Michael Nelsen, is but one of the many steampunk movie posters assembled.

[A few more below the cut]

Mon
Nov 15 2010 1:10pm

For Those About to Rock, Part 1

In 1938, while working for Columbia Records, Alex Steinweiss came up with the first album cover. Prior to his invention of the 12 inch sleeve records were sold in brown paper, or bound in book like “albums” dressed in leather and gold leaf. What Steinweiss was trying to do was create mini posters to advertise the music, but what he inadvertently came up with was one of the greatest formats for visual storytelling to grace the shelves. Check out Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.

[Read more]

Fri
Nov 12 2010 4:57pm

A is for Artist: R

A is for Artist: R

As we continue our journey through the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well-known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, and a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more]

Fri
Nov 5 2010 1:48pm

A is for Artist: Q

A is for Artist: Q

As we continue our journey through the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well-known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, and a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more]

Wed
Nov 3 2010 1:55pm

Trailer for Star Wars Art: Visions

The Star Wars franchise has often displayed a lack of shame when it comes to its own merchandising (Jar Jar inflatable chair, anyone?), but the new coffeetable book out now from Abrams, Star Wars Art: Visions, is emphatically not one of those missteps.

We recently received this at the Tor.com office and spent a good amount of time doing nothing but flipping through. The book is enormous and features a huge array of artists, many of whom you’ve seen here on the site. The art ranges from hilarious re-imaginings (Boba Fett really knows how to ride a dragon), to epic vistas to, yes, naked Twi’leks. It’s out this week from Abrams and is a really beautiful piece.

Fri
Oct 29 2010 5:36pm

A is for Artist: P

A is for Artist: P

As we continue our journey through the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well-known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, and a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more]

Wed
Oct 27 2010 12:39pm

Raiders of the Lost Ark in the style of Popeye. And in 3D.

Raiders of the Lost Ark by Chuck ForsmanChuck Forsman has summed up Raiders of the Lost Ark (the only Indian Jones movie) drawn in the style of Popeye. My morning is made.

Now I want to run home and play with my Raiders cards.

And watch the movie.

But not in 3D. Why, George, why! Weren’t those other two movies travesty enough against the Jones name? I’m not against 3D on principle, but I am against revisionist filmmaking.

[Chuck Forsman link via Drawn]

Fri
Oct 22 2010 2:48pm

A is for Artist: O

A is for Artist: O

As we continue our journey through the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well-known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, and a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more]

Fri
Oct 15 2010 3:34pm

A is for Artist: N

A is for Artist: N

As we continue our journey through the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well-known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, and a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more. One image somewhat NSFW]

Wed
Oct 13 2010 10:30am

The Art of Drew Struzan

The Art of Drew Struzan from Titan BooksA gorgeous new book about the movie poster work of Drew Struzan The Art of Drew Struzan, has just been released by Titan Books. It’s written by David J. Schow, book and film writer, and Struzan himself. It’s visual chocolate for every lover of movie posters, and every type of working and wannabe illustrator.

[Read more]

Tue
Oct 12 2010 11:31am

The Art of Spellbound

Spellbound by Blake Charlton, illustration by Todd Lockwood

Far as I can tell, authors should be to cover art as cheerleaders are to a football game. Lemme ’splain. Just as cheerleaders might inspire their team by throwing each other around, so authors might inspire their art directors and artists by submitting various passages, describing a feel for the book, and advising how the cover might improve the reading experience. This general lack of control is a large source of anxiety for many authors. We had control of every single letter inside, but now that we’re on the outside…well…we have only metaphorical pompoms.

So, if we’re smart, we jump about with inspiration for our art department, and try to shake off any bad-cover nightmares that (if one writes epic fantasy) include metal bikinis or other artistic no-nos. Fortunately for me, my team is one of the best: Tordot’s own brilliant Irene Gallo carries the art director’s whistle and clipboard; fantasy-art-minor-deity Todd Lockwood plays starting pigment slinger. After the beautiful art they produced for my first novel, Spellwright, I had been eagerly waiting for their art for the sequel, Spellbound, due out Summer 2011. They’ve exceeded my every expectation.

[Read more]

Mon
Oct 11 2010 4:22pm

Something Wicked This Way Comes art by David Grove

Something Wicked This Way Comes art by David Grove

“First of all, it was October. A rare month for boys.”

Every October I ritually watch Something Wicked This Way Comes as a way of ringing in the Halloween spirit that pervades the month. It’s not the best film, but over the years, despite it’s stilted and cliched dialog delivered by two twelve-year-olds trying to act, I’ve come to adore it.

The flavor of the story is beautifully captured in the movie poster by my once teacher, once mentor, and long-time friend, David Grove. Its near magical method of loose paint flows into rich, saturated runs of color, giving the illusion that it was painted in a quick, haphazard session. Besides those passages that underly the delicately rendered focal points that bleed light and life into the entire composition, the painting and I have a bit of a special connection: it haunts me.

[Read more]

Mon
Oct 4 2010 3:28pm

Paul Tobin Counts Down the 40 Greatest Comic Cover Artists

Comics writer Paul Tobin (several Marvel Adventures books, Age of the Sentry, Models Inc, and more) is in the midst of a 40-part series on the greatest comic book cover artists ever. Why? In his words:

Recently, on a trip to a comic store, I was DISGUSTED by the overall lack of design on covers. Most covers were nothing more than two or three characters punching each other and snarling, the exact kind of design that I would have worked out when I was eight years old, and spat on by the time I was ten. So, why do such covers proliferate the shelves? One reason is for trade dressing… so that any cover can be put upon almost any trade compilation, which is one of the reasons behind the other Far Too Common cover design… that of the character or team standing at attention, looking tough, staring at the viewer. Fuck that. I’m lucky enough to work largely with editor Nate Cosby, who does very good work at hiring talented cover artists and creating covers that don’t piss me off, but in consideration of my other less lucky friends, and the industry as a whole, I’m going to spend the next few weeks counting down my own personal Top 40 Comic Book Cover Artists… the ones who got it right.

So far, Tobin is up to #23 (Syd Shores, if you’re curious). He’s already featured such luminaries as Brian Bolland, Frank Quitely, Frank Frazetta, Jaime Hernandez, Darwyn Cooke, Mike Mignola, Charles Burns, and many, many more. Don’t be mad if you’re favorite artist isn’t up there, he urges. Some of his aren’t up there either. (The series is evaluating for cover work only.)

Check it out for some instant eye candy and a great basic understanding of the difference between comics work as art and comics work as product packaging.


Chris Greenland finds the above Animal Man cover deeply, thoughtfully terrifying.

Fri
Oct 1 2010 2:44pm

A is for Artist: L

As we journey past the quarter mark of the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include: a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more]

Fri
Sep 24 2010 1:31pm

Charles Vess and The Wheel of Time. Or, Charlie Goes to Randland

Charles Vess, Wheel of TimeNormally I don’t show off sketches without having the finals to back them, but when your inbox contains ten Charles Vess sketches for the Wheel of Time, it’s hard not to crow.

Charles Vess, Drawing Down the MoonCharles Vess, artist for the New York Times-bestselling Instructions, Sandman, and countless other glorious drawings (yes! I’m a fan-girl) is creating the cover plus ten interior drawings for our young adult e-edition of the first part of the Wheel of Time, From the Two Rivers. Above are two sketches. The book will be available March 2011. 

If, like me, you are finding it hard to wait, check out Drawing Down the Moon, Charles’s art book from Dark Horse, in the meantime.


Irene Gallo is the Art Director for Tor Books and Tor.com.

Fri
Sep 24 2010 12:04pm

A is for Artist: K

As we journey past the quarter mark of the alphabet some of you may have noticed a slight itching in the back of your eyes. Maybe you’ve felt hunger pains, not in your belly, but at the midpoint of your head. That’s where your visual cortex is found and that hunger signals the beginning stages of art addiction. Other symptoms include: a compulsive need to discover all the names of teachers and friends of a particular well known artist, exploding bookcases due to the weight of too many art books, a deep knowledge of auction houses and their scheduled public viewings. Lastly, hives.

Don’t worry, the addiction is relatively benign and plenty of support groups exist. Just remember, it’s a scavenger hunt which has no list and never ends.

[Read more. Some NSFW]

Tue
Sep 21 2010 4:01pm

Jeff Jones “Better Things” Documentary Trailer

A second trailer went up today for “Better Things: Life and Choices of Jeffrey Jones.” It’s a treasure all on its own, with eight minutes of substantive interviews with Jeff Jones, Rick Berry, Rebecca Guay, Moebius , Dave McKean, Paul Pope, Mark Chiarello, Mike Kaluta, and publisher Robert Wiener.

I’ve been watching this documentry evolve from afar—I’m looking forward to seeing it comepleted now more than ever.